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Author Topic: Survival rates/location/brief description of your hive  (Read 5094 times)
AliciaH
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Location: Enumclaw Plateau, WA


« Reply #40 on: March 19, 2011, 12:04:56 PM »

1 loss so far, with 5 possibles in the works, out of a starting total of 18.  I had 15 in my back field apiary, 3 in my front yard.

In the back field:  Lost 1 in January.  Cluster dwindled and they got too cold to move to the food.  Am currently losing a 2nd to bad bout of nosema.  Am currently losing a 3rd to a combination of nosema and lack of food (I've replenished their stores and am treating so we'll see).  I have a 4th back there where the queen is not laying, the verdict is out.  These hives are all part of the icky nucs purchased last year.

In the front yard I am losing one to stavation so have replenished their honey frames.  That hive has the only remaining queen of the 8 I purchased last year.  The reason the others didn't make it and this one is dwindling is their lack of ability to forage.

Also in the front yard, I also may have a queenless hive.  That hive is three years old so if the queen really is there and just hasn't started yet, then I hope she starts soon.  I've been really happy those bees so far!
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organicfarmer
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Location: Jamaica Plain MA 02130


« Reply #41 on: March 19, 2011, 12:53:07 PM »

i have 3 full colonies and 1 nuc left out of 10 colonies and 1 nuc that went in the winter.  Sad Still one apiary to check... i am afraid to go so i postpone, which is not a good idea i know if i need to do an emergency action.
As another MA beekeeper noted up here, the late summer and fall drought was a disaster for the bees who ate their early season stores. i harvested nothing, fed like mad, put candy on top as well, but that was not enough. For me 2 bad seasons in a row (though last year i lost only 1 out of 5)
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BillyMac
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Location: Upstate NY

Leave a little bit of happiness where ever you go.


« Reply #42 on: March 19, 2011, 02:09:23 PM »

Hi,
This is my second year with bees.  First year I started with 2 hives and now I have 5.  Both first year hives survived last winter with two deeps and a medium.  I figured if that worked last year why mess with success.  This winter all five hives were two deep and a medium (I have to say this winter has been brutal here in upstate NY, near Syracuse.  We've had close to 175" of snow so far and many very cold nights, much worse than last year).  Here's my setup..... all hives with reduced bottom entrance and a top entrance, solid wood bottom, ten frame lang hives,  wrapped with bubble wrap insulation and tar paper over that,  inside hive I put absorbent material "chux" between the telescoping top cover and inner cover to help with condensation.  I also made some candy that I put into the hives last fall to serve as emergency rations if needed.  I placed this on top of the uppermost deep box so that as time went by they would work their way up to the candy later in the winter.  The candy is a sugar mixture that supposedly does NOT stimulate laying by the queen.  Well, as winter went on I saw very little activity from the hives and I was worried they all died.  They are in the back of our property (almost 8 acres) so I can get to them regularly to clear the bottom entrance of snow.  We had a day near 60 degrees last week and I busted home after work to check the hives.  I knew they would be active if still alive.  I was pleasantly surprised to see all 5 hives with activity.  One hive is not as active as the other 4 but it still had bees coming and going.  The other 4 were quite busy.  I think they all made it but I agree with an earlier post that we still have some more winter to get through.  I am a little concerned for the weak hive but still thrilled they are all alive. grin  I should also say that last year we harvested about 50# of honey per hive via crush and strain.  The honey was lightly colored with outstanding flavor.  I creamed some of it using the Dyse method and my wife makes lip balm with the wax.  We gave most of it away and are having a lot of fun.  I think about getting more hives going but 5 is about all I can handle as one of my hobbies.  I have to say my success is due greatly to my mentor (local beek) and also to this website.  I've gained so much knowledge from many on here!  THANKS Smiley
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mvanek
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Location: holyoke, massachusetts


« Reply #43 on: March 19, 2011, 03:42:28 PM »

New beek.  Lost my one hive from an Italian package this past May.  It looked like they starved, poor girls though I fed them in the fall and put some sugar for them on top of the frames on the one warm day we had in february.  Sounds like it was a tough winter for bees in this area.  I am very sad to have lost the hive...I had a great summer and fall watching them.  I need to learn a lot more from them and you all, it sounds like!
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gguidester
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Location: S.E. Wisconsin


« Reply #44 on: March 19, 2011, 11:40:25 PM »

 Wink  So far all 3 surviving and flying on warm day.  Better than last year, lost 6 of 6 before winter started.Very much ready for spring here iin SE Wisconsin.  Go Badgers!!
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T Beek
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Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #45 on: March 20, 2011, 05:09:28 PM »

Three of my loses were first year caught swarms.   My Long Hive was in its 2nd winter and if it swarmed we didn't know about it., 

Winter is still very much with us in Northwest Wisconsin.  Got up to 39 F today but rainy and windy.  My lone survivor, a package started 5, no its six years ago come April, with one queen replacement, by me anyway Wink was bubbling out both top and bottom entrances friday and yesterday.  They've aparantly found the feed I left them as even the P-willows are slow coming around, good thing too, with these temps.  I swear its a super colony Smiley.  Its a strong colony with plenty to eat.

thomas
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"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
slaphead
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Location: Seattle Washington area

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« Reply #46 on: March 27, 2011, 08:44:12 AM »

Not a good winter for my girls.

We went into the winter with six 10-frame Langs and a TBH at one apiary and two 10-frame Langs and three 8-frame Langs at a second.

Four of six Langs have survived at the first apiary; the central Langs on each 3-hive stand died. Will reduce hives to two per stand this year. The TBH starved with the cluster unable to move to stores.

One out of five Langs survived at the second apiary and the surviving colony is weak. All four dead-outs starved. One with about 80 pounds of honey left in the top box. Moved 3 frames from there to the weak colony to help them along. Scratched the surfaces of two to draw the bees to them.

Overall losses - 58%.

All hives had top entrances and appeared dry (no condensation issues). I did not wrap them and suspect that may have been a mistake.

Now building wind proof hive stands and Warre inspired duvet tops in the hope of keeping the hives warmer. Considering options for improving the insulation of the hive walls (suggestions welcome Smiley).

SH
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The only thing we have to fear is fear itself - FDR, 1933
beek4018
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Location: Dublin, Ireland


« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2011, 09:32:35 AM »

Central Indiana.  Only have one hive and it survived, but looks ( to my first year eye) to be weak ( low population..

Has several frames of capped stores on the sides, but only 1 frame of brood so far.

Got the candy board back on in preparation for a return of cold ( 20 degree) weather and some snow this week.

Now we wait and see if they make it.

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JD
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Location: Cheney, Ks


« Reply #48 on: March 27, 2011, 02:05:05 PM »

Cheney Kansas,
    All four hives survived. All modified after the D.E hive. Two deeps each. All have modified slatted bottom boards, and the entrances were left open. All painted Pony Tail. It's not dark and its not light in color. Camouflaged after dead grass. This year I,m making candy boards for them kind of as an insurance policy. 
           JD   
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mathew
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Location: Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada


« Reply #49 on: March 27, 2011, 07:58:30 PM »

Vancouver, British Columbia

1 out of 3 hive survived. Last hive has less than a frame of bees. Queen just started laying yesterday. Too late for comfort.
1 died from starvation in January-Old queen going into 2nd winter should have combined or requeened. No winter wrap and open screen bottom. Single hive box. Only stored 3 gallons of 2:1 syrup. Rest of the hive stored 10 gallons.
2nd died from Nosema in early February. Winter wrapped and open screen bottom. 2 deep hives
3rd hive surviving- winter wrapped and open screen bottom. 2 deep hives. Still have lots of storage from fall. Been feeding pollen patties and 1:1 sugar syrup to keep them going. Closed the screen bottom with the board. Just reduced to one deep super.
Should have closed screen bottom all winter. Last year's winter had many 50 deg F flunctuations. This year it was cold for long periods and when it was warm it rained. Hardly any flying days.
Only treat my hives with sugar dusting for varroa. Fed Fumagilin for Nosema.

Hardly any blooms in my area. 1st reliable bloom were from purple crocus. Cherry blossoms are really blooming at glacial speed coz of the cold temperatures at night. Usually can expect lots of blooms by now like cherry, onion chives.
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catbackr
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Location: Derby, Kansas


« Reply #50 on: March 29, 2011, 01:12:07 PM »

South central Kansas.  2 of 2 survived the coldest winter we've had in years.  Both are top bar hives and are doing very well this spring.  I lost a top bar in late fall when it was blown over by a bad wind storm and I didn't find it in time.
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CVBees
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Location: Carroll Valley, PA

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« Reply #51 on: March 30, 2011, 02:46:11 PM »

I had some leftover honey that I fed back to them in February, and now that temps are warming back up at least a little, I'm feeding them 1:1 sugar syrup again and a pollen patty.  I hope this is the right thing to do. 
The best thing to do.. I lost my only 2 hives because I thought the buggers would move.. but an odd warm week sent the queen a laying and did she ever.  They stayed on the brood till a snap came then lost the lot but not before the brood were cannabalized.  Keep em fed till first flow.
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Bees are the key to life as we know it.
Grid
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Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada


« Reply #52 on: March 30, 2011, 06:35:08 PM »

Ottawa, Ontario.  A little early to say final numbers.  Six hives went into winter.  One starved.  Two look weak but are hanging in there with small clusters.  Three strong hives.

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