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Author Topic: nitrile gloves  (Read 3445 times)

Offline KD4MOJ

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #20 on: March 16, 2011, 08:40:21 AM »
HHmm my "nitrile-xtra" gloves don't have a thickness listed on the box... they are the medical ones though... I'll have to try them on my next inspection.

...DOUG
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Offline FRAMEshift

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #21 on: March 16, 2011, 09:16:22 AM »
Thanks for the link Tom.   Fat Bee Man if a clever guy.

Just to avoid confusion on the part of those who have not encountered this before,  I believe the reference at the beginning of the linked page (the stuff about temperature modulation of bee castes)   is pure garbage.  I reviewed all the original research papers making these claims and it is not credible. 
"You never can tell with bees."  --  Winnie-the-Pooh

Offline Zamboy13

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #22 on: March 16, 2011, 09:49:07 AM »
Hi there

Do surgical gloves work too? What about applying baby powder to your bare hands? I've read in a different beekeeping forum that baby powder may also lessen the urge of the bees to sting your hands.

Offline TomP

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #23 on: March 16, 2011, 10:23:37 AM »
I listened to a pod cast a few weeks ago where "Fat Bee Man" said to rub your bare hands with a few drops of "liquid smoke",
Interesting.  Do you have a link to the podcast?

The podcast is in 3 parts.  You can find them at http://somdbeekeeper.com/

Thanks for the link Tom.   Fat Bee Man if a clever guy.

Just to avoid confusion on the part of those who have not encountered this before,  I believe the reference at the beginning of the linked page (the stuff about temperature modulation of bee castes)   is pure garbage.  I reviewed all the original research papers making these claims and it is not credible. 

You are welcome Frameshift.  I know the bees share roles in the hive, depending on what the needs of the hive are.  I do wonder if there is a specific role for the heater bees in the  brood nest other than general heat.  I have read some interesting things about bee temp and CCD (http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=59)
and the Japanese honeybee, temperature and chalkbrood (http://www.sciencenewsmagazine.org/pages/pdfs/data/2000/157-22/15722-07.pdf) so it just makes me think... (http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,31919.0.html)

oh well. 

Regarding gloves, I only use them if the hive is really hot.  Since I am a hobby beekeeper in a suburban setting, I will not keep a hive that is that hot.  So gloves mean time to get a new queen for me.

Offline Acebird

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #24 on: March 16, 2011, 11:01:24 AM »
Quote
I listened to a pod cast a few weeks ago where "Fat Bee Man" said to rub your bare hands with a few drops of "liquid smoke", such as that used in food seasoning.


An old timer told me it is better to smoke yourself than the bees.  I just use my smoker.  Smoke your hands, smoke your cloths and smoke your hair that will retain the smoke the best.
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Offline Bee-Bop

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #25 on: March 16, 2011, 11:31:11 AM »


 I just use my smoker.  Smoke your hands, smoke your cloths and smoke your hair that will retain the smoke the best.

Then who do I complain to about breathing second hand smoke ??   :roll:

Bee-Bop     :)
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Offline FRAMEshift

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #26 on: March 16, 2011, 12:47:00 PM »
You are welcome Frameshift.  I know the bees share roles in the hive, depending on what the needs of the hive are.  I do wonder if there is a specific role for the heater bees in the  brood nest other than general heat.  I have read some interesting things about bee temp and CCD
Excellent references.  Oh, I agree that heater bees have some specific roles.  There is an overall regulation of cluster temperature and also control of the temperature of individual brood cells.  My problem is with the claims that temperature is used (as in alligators) to control or modify future bee function.  (http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,31777.0.html)   And it might even be true.... but the existing research surely does not support such a conclusion.  This work is all done at temperatures below even the minimum observed temperatures in brood cells.   I think it is totally irrelevant.
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Offline Acebird

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #27 on: March 16, 2011, 12:56:02 PM »
Quote
Then who do I complain to about breathing second hand smoke ??   


Ooh, sorry I left out important safety procedure.  Close your eyes and hold your breath while you smoke then make three steps into the wind before inhaling.  Smoke particles will be bad for anything that breaths including your bees.  Smoke particles on hard objects will not hurt anyone but will have the same effect.
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Offline NasalSponge

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #28 on: March 16, 2011, 11:56:24 PM »
I do smoke my hands, I have never used the nitrile gloves for bees, but I use 8 mil @ work, I also use some 15 mil latex and yes they will make you sweat buckets... :-D

Offline BlueBee

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #29 on: March 17, 2011, 01:37:02 AM »
Quote
Smoke particles on hard objects will not hurt anyone but will have the same effect.

I’m not disputing this since I have never tried to smoke myself, however if the smoke particle has landed on a hard surface and is no longer in the air how would a bee sense it?  Do they lick your hands to detect the particles?  Just wondering.

I might give this hand smoking thing a try, but I usually use knit gloves dipped in latex.


Offline slacker361

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #30 on: March 17, 2011, 08:09:31 PM »
ok im confused..... smoke is used to confuse the bees so they do not smell the warning or attack pheromones that are released during a danger situation... how does the smoke on ones hand interfere with that pheromone?

Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: nitrile gloves
« Reply #31 on: March 18, 2011, 01:51:28 AM »
ok im confused..... smoke is used to confuse the bees so they do not smell the warning or attack pheromones that are released during a danger situation... how does the smoke on ones hand interfere with that pheromone?

It doesn't interfere with the attack pheromone, it masks the odor of the human body, which bees and some humans find offensive.  Bees find most animal odors offensive, man is an animal.  I just sheared my sheep today, if I had gone from that directly into the bees I would have been mobbed big time.  With some animal odors it is necessary to do a complete change of clothing and foot wear and a shower doesn't hurt either, sheep are one of those animals because of the lanolin in the wool.
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