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Author Topic: Is Transferring to a Nuc Box necessary?  (Read 848 times)
mathew
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« on: March 09, 2011, 09:55:07 PM »

I have a hive that is coming out of winter very weak. There is about half a frame of bees left. The weather is starting to warm up into spring temperatures and I have flowers starting to bloom in extravagance in 2 weeks. The hive is in a double brood chamber and they are clustererd in the upper chamber. The entrances are all reduced. There is an abundance of pollen and honey frames in the supers. I was wondering if it is necessary to transfer the remaining bees to a nuc box later in April/May. Any thoughts on this?
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kathyp
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« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2011, 10:02:50 PM »

it probably would be helpful to at least remove one deep and leave them with one. a nuc would be nice, but if you don't already have one handy, it likely will not matter.  they don't have much chance anyway.
 you need to make sure they have a queen first.  then, if you have another hive that is strong, you can take a frame of brood and bees and try to boost that one.  just don't swap the queen.

feed them because they don't have enough workers to gather.  there is a slim chance that you can pull they through if there is a good queen and especially if you can help boost their numbers.

if you don't have a queen, combine them with another hive. 
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edward
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« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2011, 10:11:12 PM »

Bees should bee packed in , no use in them spending energy that they don't have warming up a hive that is to big for them.

It is better if the have a smaller hive,

If you have a stronger hive you can move a frame of bees that are about to hatch , with the worker bees still on it , to do this you hare to make sure the queen is not on this frame , to the weaker hive.

You can also place the week hive on top of a strong hive with a mesh mosquito net between the hives so the bees and queens cant mix , the week hive will benefit from the warmth of the larger hive , then they don't need to use as much time and energy keeping there hive warm.

mvh edward  tongue
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mathew
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« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2011, 10:27:39 PM »

I saw the queen on Sunday and she has not started laying yet. She looks thinner from the last time I saw her in October. I guess her abdomen is smaller from not laying.

Good point about reducing the size of the hive for warmth.
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cam
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2011, 06:44:01 AM »

The queen should be laying by now. A frame of brood and bees might stimulate her to start laying. But I think the hive is doomed if she hasn't started laying by now. I'd combine.
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2011, 12:21:44 AM »

The queen might have failed.

However, if you really wish to preserve this hive I would recommend you add a frame of brood from your strongest hive, if possible, then reduce the size of the hive to want is the minimum area to contain the bees within the framework of the hive.
That can be done by removing extra boxes and using a follower board to narrow the width of the hive to a managable size for the amount of bees.  Then feed it, a pint of warm syrup early in the day.  If they don't take the full pint reheat it and feed it back to them the next day.  The syrup should be just a little warmer than tepid.  The amount you feed can be increased as the size of the hive increases.  Remove follower board and anothe brood chamber when warrented.
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2011, 12:32:38 AM »

If that queen is not laying I would bet she craped out.  I would add a frame of brood to for now and see what happens.  If she starts laying the colony could turn around.  If she does not start to lay then I would pinch her and combine. 

I had a couple week ones like that last spring but the queens were laying.  One took all summer to recover and the other got robbed to death.  I did not give them any help though cause I wanted to see if they could make it on their own for giggles.
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