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Author Topic: My Frankenstein plastic frame  (Read 1717 times)

Offline bayareaartist

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My Frankenstein plastic frame
« on: June 09, 2005, 10:25:18 PM »
My Frankenstein plastic frame

So in the beginning/ last month when I ordered equipment I bought some plastic frames.
 I got them but when It was time for me to install the swarm I had I went with a different design, 12” deep foundationless frames. It was an ordeal, I made them myself and the bees are busy drawing comb, I must add after I had to tie the comb on with string to get them to go the right way, I haven’t looked since Monday so for all I know it will be one big mass when I get there Saturday, But I digress.

I needed some frames and I wanted to still go with the foundationless and at this time I have no interest in building them, at least not tonight.
So I kept thinking, why doesn’t the plastic frame manufactures make foundationless plastic frames?
Then I had this idea, I will take my plastic frames and cut out the plastic foundation to leave a strip all the way around and then wire it through the middle for support.

So this is what I did, I like it, the plastic foundation was warped to one side anyway and from what I have read I knew it was going to cause me some problems.

So here is the frame with the original one behind it.
It is homage to Michael Bush and his deep foundationless frame on his site.
I hope it’s ok to say this.

http://www.geocities.com/clayincal/plastic_frame.jpg
Donn

Offline Phoenix

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My Frankenstein plastic frame
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2005, 12:58:28 AM »
Just a suggestion Donn, I would run the wire vertical instead.  When the bees draw out foundationless frames with a horizontal wire, they hit the wire like a roadblock and stalls their progress.  If the hive is not perfectly level the foundation may lean toward one side and miss the wire.  By placing the wire vertical they will follow the wire all the way down and use it as a guide.

Offline Michael Bush

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My Frankenstein plastic frame
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2005, 11:48:25 AM »
It's a good idea.  I don't know if it's worth the effort.  Charles Martin Smith (Unfoundation) told me he tried to get Pierco to make foundationless plastic but it was going to cost a lot for a mold.

Construtive critisisms:  The bees should attach it all the way around pretty well since you left that little bit sticking out, although I'd be tempted to wax it where you cut for good measure.  I think the wire is too tight because the bottom bar is bowed.  Although I did the same thing (horizontal welding rod in the center) I think vertical would be better.  Vertical is what Langstroth did (although it was wood).  I'd be tempted next time I do Dadant Deeps to put a dowel up the middle vertically.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline bayareaartist

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My Frankenstein plastic frame
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2005, 12:13:43 PM »
I can change the wire, and they arn't bowed the picture is just warped, my great photography skill at work.

the frames were waxed to begin with so I am going to put a box of these on tomorow and see what the bees do. that is after I change the wire.

thanks,

It is too bad we can't get the foundationless frames, but I can just cut them out too.
Donn

 

anything