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Author Topic: Forced Inspections???  (Read 9250 times)
kathyp
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« Reply #100 on: February 14, 2011, 04:08:46 PM »

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Lifespans are decreasing now due to what is being put in commercial food

show me data to back this.

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I think in Japan's case importing food from this country has decreased their lifespan also.

and this.

i do understand that there was a  headline about this that made a big slash, but the report failed to do a meaningful breakdown.  it failed, for instance, to account for those who had immigrated to this country as adults and had not had benefit of good health care or diet in their home country.
life span 100 years ago was much shorter than now and there were not packaged foods to account for it.

 
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But to say you have to taint the food to make a profit is pure hogwash

did i say this?  i merely point out that when your only source of food is what you have grown, you may find yourself SOL when things go wrong.

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Some of the big farms today are not producing food anymore they are producing fuel with a net energy loss.  Does that make sense?

it make no sense.  putting a food source in your fuel tank is the height of stupidity.  subsidizing same, is the height of government stupid, waste, and is typical of government programs.
not to mention what it's done to our weed whackers........
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #101 on: February 14, 2011, 06:29:34 PM »

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it make no sense.

It makes sense if you are big Ag.  You have the government at your fingertips for support and vertually no regulation because it is not food.  Watch out!

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show me data to back this.
Now it's my turn, do your research...read.  Or is that too much work for ya now.  grin
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kathyp
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« Reply #102 on: February 14, 2011, 07:09:15 PM »

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Now it's my turn, do your research...read.  Or is that too much work for ya now

you made the assertion.  it's not up to me to prove it.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
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« Reply #103 on: February 14, 2011, 07:31:24 PM »

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it's not up to me to prove it.

He, he, it is not going to affect my life if I prove it to you now is it?  Wink
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T Beek
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« Reply #104 on: February 15, 2011, 08:19:25 AM »

Blah, blah, blah.  You people know, history is mostly fiction, right?  Most of our recognized HIS-STORY includes tales told with "some" facts sprinkled in and written or financed by some rich white men who made sure "their' version survived and any others put underground (literally, more often than not). 

What do you think has been removed from the history we've been convinced is true?  Anything??  Does anyone else even consider this?  Not enough, I think.  Like putting in a garden, its too hard rolleyes  We'd rather absorb someone Else's interpretation of history as long as it 'fits' our own personal viewpoint.  It makes it easier to live with ourselves I suppose.

As long as someone brought it up;  100 years ago most Americans were still on the farm, something like 80%, a complete reversal from today and most were extremely self-sufficiant when compared to what we've become.  I doubt any of them on farms 100 years ago were dieing due to starvation (of course this doesn't account for the dust bowl years, which were directly related to the AG Industry, due to its own shortsighted profit motives, people were starving then, no doubt, but it was more likely due to the poor farm management practices farmers were told to adapt by the Ag Industry, more than anything else). 

100 years ago people (even children) in our cities factories could still be 'worked to death' and likely contributed as much to a lower life expectancy as the 'alleged' diverse food shortage implied above.  We could use a movement/union like the 'Wobblies' (sp?) now more than ever.  ONE UNION FOR ALL WORKERS was/is a mantra worth embracing.  Again; See EGYPT

100 years ago Banks and their owners ruled our world for their own profits just like they do now.  That hasn't changed except they've gotten even better at manipulating us; See FOX News for many examples grin  I know, I know, now I've likely started a fight, but hey, this IS still America, right?Huh  We'll see.

I still say this conversation is way OFF TOPIC and should be sent to some other place besides a beekeeping site.

thomas
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kingbee
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« Reply #105 on: February 15, 2011, 11:55:34 PM »

... I wonder how all those Africans have managed to crawl into the heart of an "Africanized" colony and take the honey from them with no bee suit...

HBW1412, is this the type of bee keeping you had in mind?
Facing angry bees 40 metres high and unattached for honey - Human Planet: Jungles, preview - BBC One


Watch closely, the African bees in this video sting.

The ax Te-Te uses is almost an exact replica of the one buried in a glacier with Otzi the Ice Man over 5K years ago, except that Otzi's ax had a copper blade and
Te-Te's ax head looks like steel.

I wonder when someone is going to say something about Te-Te selling out to
"THE MAN" just because poor Te-Te had the nerve to use a steel ax to rob himself a little honey? 

On second, though we may not bee charging enough for Ross Rounds, comb, and chunk honey, if folks will go to this much danger and trouble for old dark honey comb with brood in it.
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HBW1412
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« Reply #106 on: February 16, 2011, 09:26:03 AM »

kingbee - Fundamentally, Yes.  That is the type of bee keeping I had in mind.  He was unimpeded by a medling government agency.  He didn't have to worry about an inspector.  He just did his thing.  Just imagine if he had to have an inspector inspect that hive or if he had to register the hive before he could harvest the honey.  If he lived in certain areas of America and did that he'd be a criminal.  Not to mention child protective "services" taking his children away. 

Granted, my method of harvesting honey would be drastically different.  This video does show something else that I mentioned in the same post you are quoting.  Africanized bees don't seem to be anymore dangerous than any other bee species.  I am still not convinced of the danger Africanized bees have been made out to pose. 

Just so you know, I haven't been in Walmart for well over a decade.  I do not like my money going oversees.  This patriotic mindset does cause me to have to look harder for the items I need, but they are out there.  I even pay a little more, but the extra cost is offset by the life of the product.   Americans produce products with superior quality. 

As far as 'ol Te-Te selling out to "The Man" as you put it, I don't think anyone would say that because he is using a steel ax.  My bet would be on a local blacksmith making that ax out of steel mined by Te-Te's fellow countrymen, therefore, Te-Te is a patriot. 
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kingbee
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« Reply #107 on: February 16, 2011, 02:05:40 PM »

... I haven't been in Walmart for ...over a decade...

When I die, I want to be cremated and my ashes sprinkled on Wal-Mart’s parking lot so my wife and children will visit me every day.  grin
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kathyp
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« Reply #108 on: February 16, 2011, 02:14:05 PM »

 lau
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
don2
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« Reply #109 on: February 16, 2011, 03:32:35 PM »

For the unaware, Just thank God you are not getting all the Government you are paying for.

Next, Life expectancy is a political thing. People are still dieing young and growing old just as they did thousand.s of years ago.

  :)don2
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kingbee
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« Reply #110 on: February 16, 2011, 09:27:00 PM »

lau

Thanks kathyp, you made my day.
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Countryboy
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« Reply #111 on: February 16, 2011, 10:00:10 PM »

Poisons are poisons.  I don’t care if they blow over to your neighbors yard upon application or not.  Eventually they will get there.  They are also absorbed by the plant that you eat from the first application on.  Each application increases the dosage.

You do realize that plants naturally produce poisons to combat pests and diseases, and levels of these toxins are often higher than trace amounts of synthetic chemicals.  If you spray plants with pesticides, they have lower levels of these natural toxins.  The question is which one is worse for you.

and at least try saving "some" seeds.  The usual response is that 'its too hard' which is simply pitiful, and this is from alleged "country" folks.  I guess that despite all the complaining, we're not suffering quite bad enough yet

There are people on eBay saving their seeds and selling those seeds. (like me)  Considering the thousands of dollars I, and other eBay sellers are making, I'd agree that folks aren't suffering enough to save seeds themselves.

And what would it cost (globally) if most of your food came from local sources where you didn’t have to burn fuel to ship it thousands of miles from where it grows.  The whole economic thing is a smoke screen.

Have you ever been to a farmers market and compared the price of locally grown produce with the price in a supermarket?  Eggs are 99 cents at Aldi's - but locally produced eggs go for $1.80 at the local produce auction.  The whole economic thing is just a smokescreen for folks who do not understand economics.

then there is the problem of protein.  raising meat is expensive and if you don't have land, you are not going to be able to do it.

Meat is not the only source of protein.  Corn and beans provides a very complete protein.  Insects are another source of protein - studies say you can get adequate protein from grasshoppers by gathering grasshoppers one hour a day in fields, and one hour a week gathering grasshoppers along lakes.  Used to, poor folks use ratmeal instead of flour to make their bread.  (ratmeal is ground up insects.)

if our only source of food had been the garden, we would have starved to death.

As the local crop advisor says, "If food disappeared off the shelves, most folks would starve in the land of plenty."  Does the grass in your yard grow?  Grass is actually very nutritious for you.  Dandelions were brought to North America as a vegetable crop.  Do nettles or lambsquarters or clover or the myriad of other wild plants grow in your area?  What about nuts and acorns?  Most folks would be shocked if they only knew how many plants are edible.

Maybe you are trying to grow the wrong crops for your area.

the cost of fuel is driving up the cost of even small farming.  unless you have 5 or 6 kids who drop out of school to farm, doing it by hand is a pretty tough prospect.

I'm a small time farmer.  My $ production per acre is quite high compared to conventional farming.  I don't have ANY kids to help me.  It all depends on management - you can work hard or you can work smart.

if you don't live in a rural area, good luck raising what you need.  never mind that you  need lots of space to be self sufficient, you town or council probably won't let you do what you need to raise meat and even tear up you property to properly raise veggies.  the old victory gardens would not happen in a HOA.

Do you have ANY greenspace?  Eat your yard.  My brother told me when he was in the military, in poor areas with apartment buildings, they would take a piece of PVC pipe, and drill holes in the side of it.  They would stand it on end, fill it with dirt, and plant plants in the side of it.  These vertical containers would line stairways and fire escapes.

You don't need that much garden space to be self sufficient.  Last year, 3 rows of kidney beans yielded me over 5 gallons of dried beans.  That's a lot of servings of beans...  For most garden, 4-8 sq feet can easily produce a pound of corn.  How many pounds of cornmeal do you eat a year?  Lots of southern folks ate johnnycakes to survive after the civil war.
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Acebird
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« Reply #112 on: February 17, 2011, 08:46:51 AM »

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If you spray plants with pesticides, they have lower levels of these natural toxins.  The question is which one is worse for you.

This part I can answer, the man made toxins because they will always have other substances contained within them that will turn out to be harmful in some way.  Just think of all the aspirins and pain killers that are being produced today.  People are taking them like candy.

If an edible plant has toxins it will not hurt you otherwise it would not be an edible plant.  A plant sprayed with pesticides will definitely hurt you in one way or another.
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T Beek
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« Reply #113 on: February 17, 2011, 12:20:56 PM »

Countryboy;  Your analysis and perspectives were right on, thanks.

thomas
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kingbee
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« Reply #114 on: February 18, 2011, 12:39:27 PM »

I have noticed that many of you speak about getting your hives inspected...
Every state is… different.   Some … register… hives.   Some want an inspection on all hives to keep diseases at bay.   Some only do inspections if you are a breeder or bee producer.  Some do nothing…

Quote from: author
We don't have to register our hives in WI, but we can, if we want to have the state inspector come out and inspect our hives . . . for free...
Every state is a little different.   Some just want you to register your hives.   Some want an inspection on all hives to keep diseases at bay.   Some only do inspections if you are a breeder or bee producer.  Some do nothing…
[in]... NC. We have a group of inspectors that come when you call. Every month, every week, once a year, or never...
In Florida, the inspector is on the look-out to see if the bees in a hive have been Africanized,…
... we haven't had an active bee inspector in Washington in over 20 years...
Nebraska scrapped it's registration and inspection laws about a decade ago.  But I PAY to have them inspected so I can sell queens...

We are now back on topic.  What are the bee laws in other states in HBW1214 region, like Tennessee, Georgia, or South Carolina?  Anyone know?

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T Beek
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« Reply #115 on: February 19, 2011, 08:44:13 AM »

As I eluded to way back at this posts beginnings, although someone mentioned that Wisconsin (not sure whom it was refered to, whether State or private/club inspectors??) offers inspections, none are required by the State (for now). 

That said, it is unlikely any such inspector (State or other) would be willing to travel the 3-400 miles North of Madison to conduct these (free?) inspections.  At least I haven't found one so willing.

I suspect that a 'forced inspection' of any kind would be remote at best in Wisconsin.....for now.

In reviewing the orginal post, it seems this discussion may have began as another attempt to instill some 'unnessesary' fear into the hearts of people who have better things to do grin.

thomas
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Rosalind
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« Reply #116 on: February 19, 2011, 01:02:19 PM »

Countryboy: Thank you!  yippie chick

I have heard the, "I don't have a green thumb, therefore neither does anyone else" argument more times than I can count, and sometimes from supposedly professional agronomists who should know better.

This:
Quote
It all depends on management - you can work hard or you can work smart.
is absolutely 100% dead-on. I see lots of farmers who work hard just to make themselves extra work. Can't tell them different though, sad to say.
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kathyp
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« Reply #117 on: February 19, 2011, 01:49:13 PM »

those of you who are experts in farming please do let the rest of us know when you have figured out how to control mother nature.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
T Beek
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« Reply #118 on: February 19, 2011, 02:30:10 PM »

 wierd thread
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Countryboy
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« Reply #119 on: February 19, 2011, 09:08:56 PM »

those of you who are experts in farming please do let the rest of us know when you have figured out how to control mother nature.

'Farming experts' know they can't control mother nature.  They've just learned how to play with the curveballs mother nature throws.

I was fortunate enough to learn quite a bit from a very successful farmer before he died.  He was looking for things he could do right now to help next year's crop - while he was planting this year's crop.  Also, he didn't try to hit a home run every year, with the biggest yield or contracting the highest prices - he strived for consistent singles and doubles (sports analogy).  In Bill's words, "You'll never go broke taking a profit.  Sometimes the best thing to do is to take the money and run, and don't look back."  (Meaning not to let it bother you if the price goes up after you sell.  The price would have dropped if you held.  Take the profit and be satisfied.)
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