Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 20, 2014, 12:34:38 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Package Bees and Pest Control  (Read 1851 times)
HBW1412
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 50

Location: Franklin County, Virginia


« on: February 06, 2011, 11:41:58 PM »

I'd like to know what is recommended as far as disease prevention and pest control for a package of bees introduced to a new hive.  I know this topic has been discussed before, but many of you stay so up to date on bee "stuff" that you may know something new. 
For instance, I had fumagilin-B on my order list because the catalog says to use it on ALL newly installed package bees.  Then I read that fumagilin-B is banned in European countries because it has been linked to cancer. 

It's difficult for someone new to beekeeping like myself to know what to do when the bee keeping catalogs in the United States says one thing and bee keepers in the rest of the world basically say we are giving our bees something that will cause us to get cancer.

So, do I treat my bees with anything or not.  I like the idea of organic, all natural hives, but is this practical with package bees?  Any advice on this would be greatly appreciated.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2011, 02:53:08 AM »

There is a wide variety of opinions.  I've never used fumigagilin nor fumidil on packages or bees in general.  I don't treat at all.  It depends on your philosophy:

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesphilosophy.htm
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
HBW1412
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 50

Location: Franklin County, Virginia


« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2011, 09:04:18 AM »

I definitely have an all-natural, organic mindset.  I don't use medications for myself or my family unless it's the absolute last option.  On the other hand, I can't afford to lose these package bees and start over.  I'd have to wait another year to get package bees and that doesn't even take into account the cost. 

I really want to go organic.  I guess I'd just dump the bees into the hive and take my chances.  Oh, one more thing....

I'm building top bar hives and I purchased pure bees wax from Hobby Lobby to drizzle along the middle of each bar.  I've read that most store bought wax has chemicals and medications in it.  I've also read that the wax isn't really necessary, but it does help.  Should I not use this wax?

Thank you for your help.
Logged
VolunteerK9
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1647

Location: Southeast Tennessee

Gamecock fan in UT land.


« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2011, 11:07:52 AM »

Save your Hobby Lobby wax for some candle making to add to the wax you are going to get from crush and strain. All your top bars need is some type of a guide i.e wooden Popsicle sticks, small strip of foundation, etc. I have some foundationless frames where I used just the wedge strip turned down at a 90 degree angle. I wish you the best in your packages. I felt like a kid waiting on Christmas waiting for my first's to arrive.
Logged
BjornBee
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3773


Location: Lewisberry, PA


« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2011, 07:51:26 PM »

I'd be interested in seeing any certification of testing for any wax showing no chemicals present. I have never seen that yet.

I don't use chemicals either. And I have the testing to prove my hives are clean of every chemicals associated with bee treatments. Unfortunately, my bees have a habit of going down the street and dragging in stuff like chemicals. Just have not been able to stop this from happening.

I hope you didn't spend too much on the wax.  rolleyes
Logged

www.bjornapiaries.com
www.pennapic.org
Please Support "National Honey Bee Day"
Northern States Queen Breeders Assoc.  www.nsqba.com
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13967


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2011, 04:40:55 AM »

Wax is a very unreliable comb guide.  A strip of wood is much more reliable at getting them in line and much more durable.  I would use the wax for candles and glue a strip of wood in the saw kerf instead of the wax.  I would not wax the wood either as the bees will attach comb better then you will attach the wax, which will make it weaker at worst, and no better at best.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8186

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2011, 07:11:16 PM »

Not to change this tread, but with a product that has been linked to cancer really needs to be looked into more.   Last week as I was ripping boards on the table saw making boxes from some new wood I just acquired, I noticed that the plywood was stamped with the California cancer warning with that wood.   (and it was untreated, so the wood and saw dust has been know to the state to cause cancer.)  I just thought that was weird.
Logged
HBW1412
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 50

Location: Franklin County, Virginia


« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2011, 07:21:46 PM »

AllenF - I think you are still on topic.  Plywood has LOTS of different chemicals in it that have been proven to cause cancer.  In fact, all manufactured wood products do.  Without those chemicals the plywood wouldn't hold together.  It's why I don't buy those pressed sawdust desks that are so often sold in furniture and discount stores across the country. 

I think you are still on topic because I have noticed some people using plywood to make their hives.  These chemicals leach out of the wood for years all the while exposing the bees and honey to these deadly chemicals.  When plywood is exposed to the sun the chemical leaching is accelerated greatly.

I don't know for sure, but I imagine most honey sold to the public is tested for the chemicals that are used to treat the bees.  I bet they aren't testing for the chemicals used in plywood, but I think if they did some would be found. 
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2011, 07:24:20 PM »

Note to self: stop bottling your honey in those OSB jars you made. grin

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8186

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2011, 07:33:51 PM »

 lau   Anything to save a buck.
Logged
Yuleluder
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 50


Location: Schuylkill County, PA


WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2011, 11:49:55 PM »

Not to change this tread, but with a product that has been linked to cancer really needs to be looked into more.   Last week as I was ripping boards on the table saw making boxes from some new wood I just acquired, I noticed that the plywood was stamped with the California cancer warning with that wood.   (and it was untreated, so the wood and saw dust has been know to the state to cause cancer.)  I just thought that was weird.

Have you ever been to California?  Everything in that state has that label.  It seems there isn't much the state of CA hasn't found that doesn't cause cancer.
Logged

Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.278 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page December 17, 2014, 02:38:52 PM
anything