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Author Topic: Crystalized Honey  (Read 2845 times)

Offline AllenF

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Re: Crystalized Honey
« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2011, 09:50:08 AM »
The dishwasher is a cool idea as long as the water is not too hot to cook the honey. 

Offline Acebird

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Re: Crystalized Honey
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2011, 12:10:35 PM »
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The dishwasher is a cool idea as long as the water is not too hot to cook the honey. 

It certainly is no hotter than a double boiler.
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Offline Hethen57

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Re: Crystalized Honey
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2011, 01:49:20 PM »
I only ran the heat on my double boiler until the temp of my honey reached 125 degrees, then cut the heat.  It seemed to take about 30 minutes at that temp to return to liquid honey.  The end product is the clearest, most perfect looking honey that I have ever had.
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Offline Acebird

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Re: Crystalized Honey
« Reply #23 on: February 10, 2011, 03:56:47 PM »
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I only ran the heat on my double boiler until the temp of my honey reached 125 degrees, then cut the heat.


Yes, but the temperature of the water bath could be up around 190 degrees.  In the dishwasher the highest the temperature will be is around 140 degrees.  Both forms of warming are from the outside in.  So the temperature closest to the surface of the container will be the warmest.  A microwave will heat form the inside out which will be more even through out the whole jar of honey.  The end result is you should have to raise the temperature less to attain the same results.  The risk would be over cooking.  That is why you want to take it slow and work you way up until you can determine how many seconds of exposure it will take for the amount of honey you are warming.
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Offline Brian D. Bray

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Re: Crystalized Honey
« Reply #24 on: February 10, 2011, 05:21:21 PM »
I only ran the heat on my double boiler until the temp of my honey reached 125 degrees, then cut the heat.  It seemed to take about 30 minutes at that temp to return to liquid honey.  The end product is the clearest, most perfect looking honey that I have ever had.

You don't really want to get honey above that temperature.  Doing so will start a Pastaurizing process that kills all the real benifits of raw honey: antiseptic, would healing, hayfever, etc.
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Offline PeeVee

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Re: Crystalized Honey
« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2011, 12:23:29 AM »
I've got a connection for an old upright freezer to convert. Couple light bulb fixtures, thermostat, and I'm thinking a small fan to stir the air.

And thanks Brian for setting straight the temperature concerns ;)
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