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Author Topic: 1st yr - 2 hives - realistic expectations?  (Read 1017 times)
Algonam
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« on: January 25, 2011, 05:27:00 PM »

I am just wondering what to expect out of 2 new hives - first timer. Should I be expecting some honey or just hope for a healthy batch of bees?
Queens/bees being introduced to hives in late May/early June near Ottawa, ON, Canada.
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Oh Canada!
D Coates
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2011, 05:38:33 PM »

Considering how far north you are I'd expect nothing honeywise and focus one healthy bees that have plenty of food to overwinter.  This is assuming you've got new hardware that needs to be drawn out and you're installing packages.  If I'm wrong and you're installing nucs, using drawn frames or both you could expect some honey.  Enjoy your new hobby/addiction!
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Ninja, is not in the dictionary.  Well played Ninja's, well played...
backyard warrior
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2011, 06:38:54 PM »

The best thing you could do is feed them from day 1 with  1 to 1 sugar syrup with fumiligin B for the first feeding and then feed them 1to1 all summer till you have two full deeps full of bees and honey.  then come fall give  them some honey supers for the fall flow and check their stores if they have enuff stores you can take some of the honey from the honey supers.  The first year i wouldnt worry too much about taking honey if you want them to live threw winter its important the first year to worry about the brood chamber and enuff stores like the other person said  welcome to the addiction its very rewarding and quite amazing to raise bees and fun isnt the word for it Smiley
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Algonam
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2011, 07:36:29 PM »

Yes, it will be nucs that are going in. Does that change things much?
I thought sugar weakens them or their immune systems..... maybe I misread.
I have to admit it would be a bit of a letdown if I didn't get to sample some of there honey!
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backyard warrior
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2011, 08:02:54 PM »

When u first get a package and there is no pollen or nectar flow early in the season the bees will starve. Once the nectar flow starts lots of pollen being brought in on their baskets ( little yellow balls on their legs )  You can stop feeding them and let them build up on the nectar flow.  One thing you have to understand is that bees need a nectar flow or be fooled that there is a nectar flow by feeding 1to1 syrup after the nectar flow to simulate a nectar flow so they draw out wax.  The bees wont make wax if there is no reason for it. So if you want to let them draw out wax during the nectar flow and they fill out two deeps completely and they have enuff stored come late summer you are good. If it is a bad spring and a poor flow the bees wont make it without a 1 to 1 feeding.

You are on a great site here and there are lots of people who are willing to help you out. There is lots of different answers you will get to know who the veterans are on here who know alot more than I.  Just remember alot of beekeeping is local and by that you need to understand that beekeeping in florida and the southern states is different then the northern states. Its best to take advice from the experienced people closest to your area that know the climate climate has lots to do with beekeeping strategies
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backyard warrior
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2011, 08:10:09 PM »

I personally like the russian and carnolian line of bees that are adapted to the northern climate they shut down the production of bees in fall and over winter on less stores than italians.  The italians are a great bee to start out with they are calm dont swarm as much and make lots of bees and honey they are great bees they have been around since the settlers but seem to do much better in the warmer climates. There is some italians that have been adapted to the northern climate but most packages from the south have bees that are adapted to warmer climates.  You can always requeen your hive in the fall with a different breed of bee but get your feet wet and enjoy the rewarding hobby of keeping bees   cheer
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2011, 09:47:37 PM »

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesexpectations.htm
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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