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Author Topic: Painting hives  (Read 2820 times)
tenderton
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« on: January 22, 2011, 09:13:57 PM »

Ok, It's probably been mentioned somewhere, but I can't find it. I'm at the point that I'm painting my newly assembled hives. I know not to paint the inside, and to put a good couple of coats on the outside. But, here's my question. Do I paint the mating surfaces of the boxes, where all the components come together? I'm on a roll painting and stopped to be sure I don't paint something I shouldn't. Does it make any difference or is there a reason not to paint the stated areas?
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2011, 09:22:34 PM »

Your choice. Some do, some don't.  I do, for moisture protection.
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« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2011, 10:16:00 PM »

I paint the top edges as well  another good tip for you is when you glue your hive boxes together it isnt a bad idea at the ends where the joints come together the wood is rough on the edges put wood glue on them so the water doesnt absorb into the wood then paint em.
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hardwood
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« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2011, 10:16:17 PM »

I paint the edges.  Trapped moisture that gets between the boxes is where the rot starts a lot of the time/

Scott
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AllenF
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« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2011, 10:57:39 PM »

If the ends are showing when I am painting a stack of boxes, it gets painted.
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BlueBee
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« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2011, 11:20:50 PM »

I paint the matting surfaces too.  But be warned, sometimes that paint “glues” boxes together stronger than any propolis will  grin
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stonecroppefarm
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« Reply #6 on: January 26, 2011, 09:58:18 PM »

I also, as most mentioned, paint the edges, in part, because the bees don't get direct exposure to these surfaces and also to protect from moisture. But I also paint the bottom board because it gets a lot of exposure to debris. I also paint the frame of the inner cover to protect it from moisture but just the frame. I am not sure if these are common practices?
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wd
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« Reply #7 on: January 26, 2011, 10:23:05 PM »

all my boxes don't rest on the edge together tight, there's gaps do to flaws, the bees propolize the edge's so I don't paint them. I've seen where some do but I don't paint the bottom board that faces inside. unless I'm experimenting, I do paint the outside exposed to weather of anything made up of wood.
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BeeCurious
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« Reply #8 on: January 27, 2011, 06:49:43 AM »

...But, here's my question. Do I paint the mating surfaces of the boxes, where all the components come together?

I recently read that someone paints the edges while the un-assembled pieces are stacked...
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tim adams
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« Reply #9 on: January 27, 2011, 07:46:34 AM »

I paint only the top edge of my boxes, guess I'm to lazy to turn them over and paint the bottom edge.
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Acebird
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« Reply #10 on: January 27, 2011, 06:26:16 PM »

Me too, I paint the top edge but not the bottom edge because of what Bluebee said.
I have yet to see moisture / rain between the top and bottom edge and we live in a damp area.  I think the sun does the most damage to raw wood because it weather checks the surface.  Then mold and algae can get a foothold to start the rot.
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sterling
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« Reply #11 on: January 28, 2011, 12:02:44 PM »

I have several to paint that are made out of cypress and I like the look of the natural wood. Is it alright to use a clear deck type waterproof stain instead of exterior paint? huh
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Acebird
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« Reply #12 on: January 28, 2011, 12:45:55 PM »

Cypress is a great wood for moist areas but my experience with it is it moves around allot as the humidity changes.  I think because of that gluing is not very successful but proplis may be the answer there.  I am of the believe that stains don't protect the wood unless it has oil in there formulation.  Others may disagree.
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T Beek
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« Reply #13 on: January 28, 2011, 02:48:49 PM »

I don't paint box edges due to problems with paint build up and levelingissues, besides potential toxicity and don't paint all of my hives either.  I've got a couple "natural" (never painted with anything) hives I mainly use to get swarms going, they're five years old now but are only outside in summer.  My tbh has only seen one season and it was sealed with boiled linseed oil.

thomas
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« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2011, 04:03:42 PM »

I'm on a roll painting and stopped to be sure I don't paint something I shouldn't. Does it make any difference or is there a reason not to paint the stated areas?

The norm seems to be only painting the outside (and perhaps edges).  It basically comes down to your own preference.  There is no wrong place to paint.  I have acquired a few deeps over the years that where painted both inside and out and they work equally as well.
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Acebird
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« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2011, 06:37:07 PM »

I think anything that is fully cured, I will say over a year old will not have any VOC's that are detrimental to the bees.  It is even less of a concern now that everything is latex.  However that being said I wouldn't want to subject my bees to the fumes of latex for first year unless you outgassed the hive in a kiln at 150 degrees for a day or so.
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T Beek
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« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2011, 09:04:40 AM »

Trying to think like a bee colony now Wink being human, it ain't easy, but after so many millions of years I do believe they know best (better than me anyway) and will seek out a hollowed out tree if given the choice, so for my own bees that's good enough incentive NOT to put anything on the "inside" that bees wouldn't have put there themselves, but that's just me.

thomas
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Acebird
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« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2011, 09:23:21 AM »

I agree with you except bees make a home in a lot of structures made of different materials not just a hollowed log or tree.
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« Reply #18 on: January 30, 2011, 08:03:05 PM »

Trying to think like a bee colony now Wink being human, it ain't easy, but after so many millions of years I do believe they know best (better than me anyway) and will seek out a hollowed out tree if given the choice, so for my own bees that's good enough incentive NOT to put anything on the "inside" that bees wouldn't have put there themselves, but that's just me.

thomas


I think your thinking like a human Wink  If you ask the bees, I think you'll find cavity size is more important than the material it is made out of......  I've seen them nest is some very interesting places.


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Acebird
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« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2011, 08:53:46 AM »

Wow, you were able to get that open without upsetting the bees and the comb?  What locality was this found in?  That hive doesn't look too insulated so how did it succeed? shocked
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