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Author Topic: beehive temp  (Read 19864 times)

Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #120 on: February 01, 2011, 03:14:14 AM »

Here is one good read on the Winter cluster:
http://westmtnapiary.com/winter_cluster.html

He writes "During the winter, only the cluster is kept warm. The rest of the inside of the hive is the same temperature as the outside air.  " = NONSENCE, that insulation means nothing. Guy is living under palmtree. That is the biggest mistake in  American beekeeping.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 03:25:22 AM by Finski »
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Offline rdy-b

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #121 on: February 01, 2011, 03:24:20 AM »
theres a link to Inferred Image in that article-one look at the image and you can clearly see the warmth extending past the cluster-RDY-B


Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #122 on: February 01, 2011, 03:35:29 AM »
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Dickallen is a member of this forum too. He wrote to finnish forum this:
http://bee.freesuperhost.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?board=english

"Varroa comes here in bee packages. Most people who have bees in Alaska do not keep bees through the winter. Instead, they buy packages that are sent from California and other states each spring. At the end of summer, all honey is taken and the bees are killed. Not everyone kills their bees, but that is the usual way it is done here. It is getting more expensive to do it that way. Last year a 4 pound (1.5 kg.) package with queen cost $80 U.S. including shipping cost. If the cost keeps increasing, maybe more people will try to keep their bees all year.

Some of us do try to keep our bees through the winter. "


Dickallen is a helicopted pilot and I believe that he has all nuts and bolts in right place in his head.


Jep. I live just at same altitude like Anchorage and no one kill bees here in autumn.

There are many beekeepers on Polar Circle are here.

/Anchorage_Helsinki.jpg[/img]
« Last Edit: February 01, 2011, 03:56:56 AM by Finski »
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Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #123 on: February 01, 2011, 03:54:00 AM »
theres a link to Inferred Image in that article-one look at the image and you can clearly see the warmth extending past the cluster-RDY-B


A cluster, human or what ever looses energy all the time. Insulation and outer temp, wind and ventilation commands how fast heat escapes.


Respiration is one point in the cluster. Cluster needs oxycen - carbon diokside ventilation and heat escapes this way too. It does like respiration heat via human lungs.



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Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #124 on: February 01, 2011, 03:58:22 AM »
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Offline Acebird

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #125 on: February 01, 2011, 10:28:23 AM »
 
Quote
I think with respect to everyone it should be wiped off the forum.

I disagree.  Censorship will kill a public forum.  Hopefully learning will occur because of what has happened.  Language barriers cause misunderstandings not personal attacks.  All that means is it takes more effort and longer to make the message clear.

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theres a link to Inferred Image in that article-one look at the image and you can clearly see the warmth extending past the cluster

Rdy-b, you have to be careful when interpreting IR pics.  They are like x-rays.  You are looking through the box.  Just for instance, if you look at the handles you will see that they appear to be hot.  They are not any hotter then the rest of the box around the handles it is just that the material is thinner and lets more radiation pass through it so it looks hotter.  I have worked with all kinds of vision applications and you really need a lot of background to be able to interpret the results.
Never thought I would do it!

Offline rdy-b

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #126 on: February 01, 2011, 08:45:56 PM »
finski-are you JIIHOO-RDY-B

Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #127 on: February 02, 2011, 01:32:00 AM »
finski-are you JIIHOO-RDY-B

yes i am
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Offline T Beek

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #128 on: February 02, 2011, 09:31:49 AM »
My own opinion is that the topic of this thread will remain irrelevant as long as some continue to compare humans with honeybees as part of the argument or conversation.  Hence "my" personal desire to see it over, which has nothing to do with censorship.  

Acebird is correct, the x-rays (Infrared, as corrected below by Finski) pictured above mean little since they show differences in "fractions" of temp, not quite as dramatic as the picture implies.  Now there's a viable subject for debate ;)

thomas
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 08:03:33 AM by T Beek »
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #129 on: February 02, 2011, 10:29:02 AM »
My own opinion is that the topic of this thread will remain irrelevant as long as some continue to compare humans with honeybees as part of the argument or conversation.  Hence "my" personal desire to see it over, which has nothing to do with censorship.  

Acebird is correct, the x-rays pictured mean little since they show differences in "fractions" of temp, not quite as dramatic as pic implies.

thomas

In the picture color is a  heat waves not x-rays. Heat waves are called infra rays because the wave lenght is under human ability to see.

Some one compare beehive to human house  ----I cannot accept that some one discuss with bees all day along. I have here a link. Look at that sometimes

http://www.missuniverse2010.net/2010/07/ena-sandra-causevic-miss-denmark-2010/

Perhaps they have used a little bit photoshop but result is good.
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Offline T Beek

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #130 on: February 02, 2011, 10:38:03 AM »
I stand corrected, I must have mispoken, thanks for pointing that out Finski :)  However, I won't take back anything else said ;).  Thanks for the interesting link.

thomas
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #131 on: February 02, 2011, 10:43:24 AM »
However, I won't take back anything else said ;).  
thomas

Never mind. I did not understand you at all. At least I have lost hope for better life when retired:)

Change your avatar. It is stupid. To be like this  http://fotoblog.refocus.de/images/20080526001701_lion_800.jpg
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Offline T Beek

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #132 on: February 02, 2011, 01:13:48 PM »
Back at you, brother.  Not "my" problem.

thomas
« Last Edit: February 03, 2011, 07:59:42 AM by T Beek »
"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."

Offline Countryboy

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #133 on: February 02, 2011, 11:55:00 PM »
I have opened hives to peek inside when there was snow on the ground. I have styrofoam lids or a sheet of styrofoam under a regular lid.  It's not uncommon to remove styrofoam and feel heat come from the inside of the hive.  The bees are still in a cluster.  The heat that I feel was heat from the cluster, but in an insulated hive the heat lost from the cluster warms the inside of the hive.

People need only to open an insulated hive in cold weather to feel the heat with their hands.

Has no one ever gotten into a brood nest on a cool spring day, when you can feel the heat coming out of the broodnest?  Bees produce heat, and that heat has to go somewhere.

Offline stonecroppefarm

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #134 on: February 03, 2011, 12:47:53 AM »
rdy-b
your suggestion
'ITS colder at night so the bees have to generate more heat it is the heat from the cluster that is fluxing the humidity-'

I agree, at night when the outside temp decreases , the temp within the beehive increases, this can only happen if the metabolism of the bees increases, perhaps in response the decrease in the outside temp. one of the byproducts of the consumption of honey is water vapor, hence the increase in %humidity in conjunction with the increase in temp; I think?


Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #135 on: February 03, 2011, 12:52:33 AM »
Bees produce heat, and that heat has to go somewhere.

Heat acts like heat at your home. If you cut the heat  from your home, you have quite soon cold.
If you keep the door open when snow is in the ground, you are soon shivering.

What is so difficult to undertand the meaning "wind shelter" "heated home" and "too hot at home".

These were the fist issue what my mom teached me when I was a schild: "Close the door, it is byed heat".
"who last comes he closes the door"
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Offline stonecroppefarm

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #136 on: February 03, 2011, 12:59:23 AM »

He writes "During the winter, only the cluster is kept warm. The rest of the inside of the hive is the same temperature as the outside air.  " = NONSENCE, that insulation means nothing. Guy is living under palmtree. That is the biggest mistake in  American beekeeping.

Finski,  before I insulated the hive, I placed the temp sensor in the hive on the bottom board. the temp there was the same as the temp outside the hive. when I added the shim on top and insulated the hive, I placed the sensor in the shim at the top of the hive. the temp there is always in the 40s F regardless of the temp outside the hive which at times is 5deg to 10deg F.

Offline BlueBee

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #137 on: February 03, 2011, 01:00:14 AM »
Ron, your bees might be the most talked about set of bees on beemaster!

Finski, your mother was a WISE woman!

Yes CountryBoy, it does boggle the mind that the effect of insulation isn’t common sense to everybody.

Offline Finski

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #138 on: February 03, 2011, 01:20:14 AM »

Finski, your mother was a WISE woman!

Yes CountryBoy, it does boggle the mind that the effect of insulation isn’t common sense to everybody.


Jep. My mother use to put woolen planket over apples and she said that the wool produce heat so apples will not freeze. But Life teaches gradually.

It was a year ago when one beekeepers insist that the polystyrene produces heat. "Put your hand on it. You feel how it heats the hand".


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Offline Countryboy

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Re: beehive temp
« Reply #139 on: February 05, 2011, 12:19:51 AM »
These were the fist issue what my mom teached me when I was a schild: "Close the door, it is byed heat".
"who last comes he closes the door"


I was raised in an underground home with a woodburning stove until we got free gas heat after they drilled an oil and gas well on the farm.  We opened the door if it got too hot.

 

anything