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Author Topic: Package Timing...  (Read 977 times)
doggonegardener
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« on: November 29, 2011, 08:34:09 PM »

I am reposting this in this forum at the suggestion of TommyT...


Ok, as a gardener, my suppliers usually time their shipments to the right time to plant in MY area.  For some reason, I don't necessarily get the feeling the package bee suppliers behave the same way.  I bet they do their packages when they do their packages and my timing is of no regard to them.  My question then is when is the best time to install and is there any real timing possible since the bees can only be in the package for so long.  My concern is that here in Wyoming, the tulips poke out of the ground around March 15th but we can have serious and random snowfall into the first week of June, and I mean SERIOUS.  I know I will have to feed for a bit after installing but how do I know when to stop?  Do I stop when I see nectar stored?  How will I know it's nectar and not syrup?  Will the girls bother to store syrup or do they just eat it directly?  Like in the fall, am I feeding them syrup so they make honey for winter or am I feeding them syrup that they consume as syrup?  I guess it's more than one question but you get the point.  I am trying to know when to install (if I have any control over that) and how to tell when to stop feeding the girls because they are now self sufficient.

Thanks in advance.

Rene
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VolunteerK9
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Gamecock fan in UT land.


« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 08:45:20 PM »

Hello..I'll take a stab at some of your concerns and I'm sure others will follow suit. As far as package orders are concerned, yes its on a first come, first served basis which means that most (not all) will sell out early in the year. Some northern beeks will chime in on their hiving packages tricks in bad weather. I really dont have to worry about that too bad where I'm at. As far as feeding syrup, bees will store it,feed it, and eat it however it will never be turned into honey-its still syrup. Many beeks, myself included, feed 2:1 in the Fall for insurance that they will have enough to overwinter on and again in the Spring 1:1 to stimulate brood rearing. I feed until they have capped stores either prior to a flow,during a dearth, or for winter prep. How much depends on a lot of different variables.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 09:15:25 PM »

You need to find a source and based on that you may or may not have some say so.  In your location I would try to get them at the end of April or the start of May if you have a choice.  You may be able to get packages from a local beekeeping group that gets packages in.  Or you may have to mail order them.  When I was in Laramie I ordered them through the mail from Bee Weaver.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Tommyt
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« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 10:29:34 PM »

Look here you may find bees close by

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,31050.0.html

Tommyt
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doggonegardener
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« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 10:54:20 PM »

Michael,

I was looking at R. Weaver out of Texas a few days ago because they had Buckfast (which I read are supposed to winter well?).  I checked out BeeWeaver.  They don't treat.  I LIKE that philosophy.  I need TOUGH bees!   I also talked to the fellow from Highland Honey in Denver/Boulder today.  Highland has package bees ready latter part of April so that fits with your advice.  They are also close enough they can either deliver on a trip up or I can drive down to get them.  I DO like the idea of Bee Weaver's bees though I emailed them to find out about their schedule!

Will I need to supply them with pollen after I install or will they be able to find some on nice days as they begin to forage and do they need it as readily as the calories from syrup?

Thanks to everyone for all the info and advice.  This newb really appreciates it.

Rene
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #5 on: November 30, 2011, 03:41:40 AM »

I had Bee Weavers for a lot of years, but after the hot ones I had, I wouldn't try them or any bees from Texas again.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
T Beek
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« Reply #6 on: November 30, 2011, 07:21:10 AM »

I'm knocking on wood now Wink.  Been getting packages from Bee weaver for a while, never had a hot one yet. A little pricy but worth every penny if you can keep them over a winter.  Spring; That's when the fun begins cool

thomas
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