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Author Topic: What's up Doc. take a look...  (Read 4989 times)
Acebird
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« Reply #40 on: January 03, 2011, 03:36:26 PM »

Quote
the Homasote is not for insulation-it is placed between the iner and outer cover to ABOSRB MOISTURE-and is very efective -you should find out if you can -there are others that swear by them-and most dont understand what they are
 Homasote is the type of material-very absorbent


Oh!  Okay, I will buy that it is absorbent but the moisture it traps will freeze and there is only so much it can absorb.  Holding moisture at the top of the hive doesn’t sound good to me.

Ya know, I probably should mention that on our first dead hive we had a Styrofoam top feeder on during the winter, using sugar water and all.  We didn’t want to starve the bees you see.  I put a pane of glass on top of it so I could pull off the top cover to watch the bees feed or drown for some.  We think the feeder created our whole moisture problem.  So this year it is no feeder and watch for moisture.  I will let you know in the Spring which one we like better.
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rdy-b
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« Reply #41 on: January 03, 2011, 03:57:03 PM »

 you change them out-without disturbing the hive-by simply taking top cover off and leave
inner cover on-dont use it- no bigy -at-least you are learning about moisture-and Im sure by now you know the bees wont
break cluster to use that feeder-not to mention cold syrup or the problems associated with it-so what is the plan to keep the hive warm and dry-your not taking advice-from any one --and we already now that your shooting in the dark -what is going on with those bees are they gona make it-whats the plan--RDY-B
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Acebird
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« Reply #42 on: January 03, 2011, 04:21:19 PM »

 
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by now you know the bees wont
break cluster to use that feeder

yep we sure did.

Quote
not taking advice-from any one


Gees, this part I don't get.  Someone in our own back yard tells us to do something and someone in Florida or Texas tells us we did it all wrong.  If the guy in Australia tells me the guy is Texas is wrong then where do we go?

I got to tell you most of the bee hives in Upstate NY are not even excessable during the winter.  We could fool with ours every 20 minutes.  But thousands of hives never have a chance of being serviced by a human during the winter time so why should we?

Quote
what is going on with those bees are they gona make it-whats the plan

The plan is if they don't make it we will get another nuc.  If they do make it I will attempt a trap out because we have a friend that has a barn full of bees.  I am also contemplating catching a swarm if our hive decides to do that.
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T Beek
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« Reply #43 on: January 03, 2011, 04:36:37 PM »

Quote
the Homasote is not for insulation-it is placed between the iner and outer cover to ABOSRB MOISTURE-and is very efective -you should find out if you can -there are others that swear by them-and most dont understand what they are
 Homasote is the type of material-very absorbent


Oh!  Okay, I will buy that it is absorbent but the moisture it traps will freeze and there is only so much it can absorb.  Holding moisture at the top of the hive doesn’t sound good to me.

Ya know, I probably should mention that on our first dead hive we had a Styrofoam top feeder on during the winter, using sugar water and all.  We didn’t want to starve the bees you see.  I put a pane of glass on top of it so I could pull off the top cover to watch the bees feed or drown for some.  We think the feeder created our whole moisture problem.  So this year it is no feeder and watch for moisture.  I will let you know in the Spring which one we like better.

  Thanks for finally mentioning that, it does explain some things you've posted, now tip your hives slightly forward.  Its good advise that should be taken.  You really had forty degrees?  I could only wish.....on second thought, I'll wait for March for that:-D.  My best advise to you acebird is to start at the beginning of this forum and "read" everything.  Good Luck to you.

thomas
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Acebird
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« Reply #44 on: January 03, 2011, 06:09:14 PM »

I don't know what the record is but we usually get a January thaw that yields pretty high temps.  I have witnessed as high as 70 degrees which is not normal.  It's not known if this is the actual January thaw  or yet to come(bitter cold usually follows).

Sorry for the laps of memory on the feeder thing.
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T Beek
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« Reply #45 on: January 04, 2011, 05:51:00 AM »

We get a January thaw "usually" but that just means it'll be above freezing for a day or two.  Never seen 70 in January in Northern Wisconsin, end of March, maybe.  Those kind of temps can cause much stress on colonies when there is no forage, so its also the time to investigated and feed if needed.

thomas
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« Reply #46 on: January 04, 2011, 06:36:48 AM »

Better bee sells a styrofoam top cover that stays warmer below than the typical metal covered tops. If you make it so the side of the boxes are colder than the top,water will condense there instead. It will then run down the sides and out the bottom if it's tilted slightly towards the opening.

http://www.betterbee.com/Products/10-Frame-Wooden-Hives-and-Components/BeeMax-Telescoping-Cover-for-Wooden-Hives
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Stone
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« Reply #47 on: January 11, 2011, 09:55:28 PM »

Regarding those white specks on the bottom board: I had those my very first winter of beekeeping (This is my second winter) and couldn't figure it out until I tasted them.  It was crystallized honey. It couldn't have been sugar because I didn't feed my first year. I have no idea how it got on the floor. I also found the same thing inside many cells.

And regarding the ventilation and moisture issue: I'm converting my top bar hives to Langs this year but my TBHs were a mess the first winter because I didn't provide the proper ventilation. LOTS of dead bees and mold all over the place when I opened them up in spring.

Then I thought about the simple lessons on convection I've been teaching my students in science for nearly thirty years and I realized what a dolt I had been for not seeing this myself.  We all know that cold air sinks and hot air rises. We just have to provide an exit for the warm air before it condenses. Just think about when you forget to put on the exhaust fan in the shower: beads of water on the ceiling.

I drilled holes on the same side as my entrances - but toward the top end -  screened them and there is the solution. The bees propolize the screens in the openings they don't want.  I believe Michael Bush has commented on top entrances/ventilation also. I've read many posts on the subject and the consensus seems to be that moisture is a much bigger threat to the colony's survival than the cold is.

My future hives will all have ventilation holes on the top supers or on those 4 inch high supers called "baggie feeders".

The homosote idea sounds like a good one. Sort of a take off on the Warre idea of the quilt box. But I don't know if I'd want to fuss with that.  I'll just make sure there is lots of ventilation at the top and see how that works.

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T Beek
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« Reply #48 on: January 12, 2011, 07:40:52 AM »

I've been using "both top and bottom entrances" on a couple hives for five seasons now.  Many (most?) ferrel colonies also have two entrances.  I'm convinced in its effectivness in helping to keep the hive inside dry.  Also use SBB with the trays in place on all my hives but one (last experiment).  As for the white specks; Pure, new wax will taste very sweet.  That said, Its always a mystery (to me) what the bees decide is trash and what is not sometimes.  In the spring, before anything has begun blooming around here, even if I've fed, my bees are all over the old cat litter I've dump around the garden perimeter all winter, rolling in it, seemingly playing, and for whatever reason, taking some of it back to the hive.  Hasn't hurt them yet as far as I know, its a "corn" based product though, so that does concern me with all that's been written about same.

One of my favorite aspects of keeping bees is still the mystery of it all.

thomas

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Robo
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« Reply #49 on: January 12, 2011, 08:46:02 AM »

Then I thought about the simple lessons on convection I've been teaching my students in science for nearly thirty years and I realized what a dolt I had been for not seeing this myself.  We all know that cold air sinks and hot air rises. We just have to provide an exit for the warm air before it condenses. Just think about when you forget to put on the exhaust fan in the shower: beads of water on the ceiling.

I drilled holes on the same side as my entrances - but toward the top end -  screened them and there is the solution. The bees propolize the screens in the openings they don't want. 

Larry,

Perhaps by trying to manage moisture by convection we are fighting with our bees.  They don't seem to lay out their nest to take advantage of convention when left to their own.  I don't want to sound like a broken record on this topic, so I'l PM you some more info.
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Stone
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« Reply #50 on: January 12, 2011, 01:39:06 PM »

T Beek,

I take your word for it that "pure new wax will taste very sweet".  But this stuff dissolved in my mouth and was crunchy just like crystallized honey.  Couldn't draw any other conclusion for this one.
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T Beek
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« Reply #51 on: January 12, 2011, 01:43:58 PM »

T Beek,

I take your word for it that "pure new wax will taste very sweet".  But this stuff dissolved in my mouth and was crunchy just like crystallized honey.  Couldn't draw any other conclusion for this one.
Woe...sorry, wasn't meant as a dispute.  Its likely what you've described. OK?

thomas
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Acebird
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« Reply #52 on: January 12, 2011, 06:32:53 PM »

In my case I did mash a few of the white ones between my fingers and it rolled together like wax would.  I suspect that who ever mentioned it that it was wax in my case.  I am reluctant to stick something in my mouth unless I know what it is.
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T Beek
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« Reply #53 on: January 13, 2011, 07:28:46 AM »

Since I put nothing inside my hives that is bad for me or mine, I'd put (and have) anything from inside my hives inside my mouth, including bees grin

thomas
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rdy-b
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« Reply #54 on: January 13, 2011, 05:12:50 PM »

Since I put nothing inside my hives that is bad for me or mine, I'd put (and have) anything from inside my hives inside my mouth, including bees grin

thomas
  yea but gota pass the smell test first--- grin  RDY-B
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sterling
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« Reply #55 on: January 13, 2011, 05:56:33 PM »

Since I put nothing inside my hives that is bad for me or mine, I'd put (and have) anything from inside my hives inside my mouth, including bees grin

thomas
I have seen things inside my hives that me or the bees didn't put in there.  grin:devilbanana:
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T Beek
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« Reply #56 on: January 13, 2011, 06:36:09 PM »

we don't have to be repulsive about it my friends, I know how sick some of you can be Wink.  Guess I would'nt put a dried up mouse in my mouth, (never had one yet).  One has to know their limitations after all, but its been fun non-the-less happy campers

Definately better than it seems cool

thomas
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hardwood
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« Reply #57 on: January 13, 2011, 07:01:04 PM »

I'll suck down a larva or two when grafting grin I'm not touchin' those roaches or spiders though...EWWWWW!

Scott
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T Beek
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« Reply #58 on: January 14, 2011, 06:16:30 AM »

I'll suck down a larva or two when grafting grin I'm not touchin' those roaches or spiders though...EWWWWW!

Scott

Yeah, bee larva is nearly 100% protien and not "bad" tasting at all raw, and they can be "very delish" when fried slightly in oil, same with cockroaches (not the germans), I use to cook up a few dozen at a time for regualr meals back a lifetime ago.  Some spiders are also eatable too, never done that though.

thomas
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« Reply #59 on: January 16, 2011, 01:01:08 AM »

bee larva is not... "bad" tasting... same with cockroaches... Some spiders are also eatable too...

And you though that the man who first ate a raw oyster was the bravest man in the history of the Earth! Ha
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