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Author Topic: In despair but not deterred  (Read 1057 times)
beewitch
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« on: January 03, 2011, 11:15:34 AM »

Hi all - I have wax moth questions.  New beek this year, just found my last hive dead - appears wax moths. It was a weak hive going into the winter.  I have learned so much this year, but am so disappointed neither of my hives made it.  I already have 2 nucs ordered for spring, though.
My questions are for my current frames.  I cut out all the moth destruction I could find.  I am freezing the better frames now to make sure.  My questions (1) how much moth damage is too much to try to save the current frame?  On my worst one I had to cut out about 1/3 of the wax.  (2)  Because I don't have a deep freeze, I can only freeze frames.  Is there any worry that the actual super (or other woodenware) has a problem?  Any other suggestions?
thanks.
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iddee
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Location: Randleman, NC


« Reply #1 on: January 03, 2011, 11:45:56 AM »

If there is 1 inch of good comb left, save it.

Atlanta has had freezing weather. No more freezing is needed.

You might want to read this thread, too.

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,30968.0.html
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
beewitch
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« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2011, 01:38:57 PM »

Thanks, Iddee.  Yes, saw that thread - it helped, too.
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2011, 02:39:28 PM »

Wax moths can survive freezing weather, and I can't imagine Atlanta in a deep freeze.

But if you get what you can off, and keep the rest cool, dry, and if possible in the light, it should deter any further damage.
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Rick
iddee
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« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2011, 02:53:34 PM »

I do not think eggs and larva can, even if the adults can. Adults will not lay eggs in cold weather. Adults do no damage to comb. Hives sitting out in Atlanta will not be damaged before warm weather.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
D Coates
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« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2011, 03:45:01 PM »

But if you get what you can off, and keep the rest cool, dry, and if possible in the light, it should deter any further damage.

How do you consistantly expose to light without running the risk of have the honey robbed out at the first above 50 dregee day?
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AllenF
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« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2011, 08:55:23 PM »

Did the frames have any honey left in them?   
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beewitch
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« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2011, 01:15:15 PM »

Hi Allen.  Very little honey.  Small amount of dead bees were clustered on right side. Why do you ask?
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AllenF
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« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2011, 02:16:01 PM »

The honey will determine if you can store in the open or not.   Today in the open the honey will get robbed out, which may not be much of a problem.  I just always freeze and store frames with honey for "just in case" or splits and why nots in the spring.   I have a couple of boxes in the freezer now that was not capped enough to extract.  Frames with no honey can be stored in the open if treated or in the cold before wax moths fly again. 
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winginit
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« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2011, 09:42:42 PM »

So sorry to hear about your hives Beewitch. Glad you're sticking with it and planning for next year.
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skatesailor
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« Reply #10 on: January 06, 2011, 07:32:29 PM »

.
[/quote]

How do you consistantly expose to light without running the risk of have the honey robbed out at the first above 50 dregee day?
[/quote]
I use my greenhouse to store my frames. Its not heated so I get 80 to 100 during the day and then ambient at night. It seems to have solved my waxmoth problems. There are cheaper alternatives such as cold frames that might work. Just bait them for mice.
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