Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
November 23, 2014, 08:41:11 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: varroa mites during winter  (Read 1851 times)
ty1on
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6

Location: Southwestern Virginia


« on: December 15, 2010, 09:56:26 PM »

I understand that during the summer that a break in the brood will reduce the varroa from reproducing. How do varroa mites surive winter with out the brood?
Logged
AllenF
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 8184

Location: Hiram, Georgia


« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2010, 10:10:48 PM »

The queen is still laying in the winter, just very very few in number compared with summer.
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2010, 10:11:41 PM »

With their heads under the covers! grin

The foretic(sp?) mites survive in the cluster along with SHB and anything else that's nasty.

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2010, 10:13:16 PM »

Allen's right, here in FL we have no true break in the brood cycle...just a slow down.

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #4 on: December 16, 2010, 04:35:47 AM »

.
It depends what kind of winter you have.

In Finland hives are broodless 5-6 months.

Mites will die here about 50% what is same figure as died bees during winter. Mites suck blood of bees.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2010, 07:16:16 AM »

Finski is right, a lot depends on where you live and since you didn't give your location..............

With our nights well below zero (F) in N/W Wisconsin I doubt my queens are laying much right now.  A lot also has to do with daylength.  Come January, viable queens begin in earnest to lay eggs, cold or not.  Ample stores and their ability to move to them becomes extremely important, as extreme cold will prevent bee cluster from moving to honey very near.

Now, give us your location so beeks in your area can be more helpful. Wink

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2010, 07:24:23 AM »

Sorry, forgot the original Q;

for my bees I haven't ever (I'm knocking on my head now) had much problem w/ varroa.  I do see some, no more than 100 or so, on a bottom board from time to time, but even the "cleaned out" bees in front of my Long Hive I checked just yesterday were mite free, dead, but mite free and other wise, healthy "looking."

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
rdy-b
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2219


Location: clayton ca


« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2010, 06:58:41 PM »

Denmark et al. (2000) describes the life cycle of V. destructor as very much synchronized with that of its honeybee host. It is thought that the hormones or pheromones of honeybees are necessary for the mite to complete its development. CHBRC (UNDATED) found that the average life expectancy for V. destructor is about 50 days during the breeding season.In bees without brood, the adult female mites can survive several months, feeding on the adult bees.

RDY-B
Logged
ty1on
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 6

Location: Southwestern Virginia


« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2010, 07:13:43 PM »

That makes sense.  The varroa have an over wintering group that is dormant and has a longer life cycle, just like the bees in the cluster.   

With this in mind, when is the best time to treat?  In the spring when they are weak and just getting started or the fall when you want to reduce the population going into the cluster?
Logged
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2010, 07:55:17 PM »

That depends a lot on your treatment methods. Most that use the commercially available treatments treat twice a year...spring and (when mite counts can be their highest) fall. Many of these treatments require that the bees be active enough to roam around the hive to come in contact with the delivery system (tapes, strips etc).

Acid ( formic and oxalic) fumigation doesn't require this type of contact however the formic acid is delivered through a saturated pad that is placed within the hive and is only effective within a certain temperature range. Oxalic acid is delivered through either a "drip"  wherein a liquid solution is drizzled between the frames directly on the bees no more than once a year and not so dependent upon the weather (however you wouldn't want to chill the brood or bees in cold weather) or by vaporization in which the crystals are heated and the resulting vapor is distributed throughout the hive. This latter system is the one I personally prefer as it is quick, not so temperature specific and is cheap (not to mention that OA is naturally present in the hive/honey to begin with).

There are many forms of varroa control and each has to decide what's best for them...I'm sure others will chime in here and give you a totally different approach!

Scott

Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
rdy-b
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2219


Location: clayton ca


« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2010, 09:47:16 PM »

  I am limited to when i treat a great deal because -I try to get as much honey as i can-my state is not easy to                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     get huge yields so i have suppers on early and on all hives that will make a crop-so for me it is of course                                   before honey flow-without that restraint the best time is before your mites get to a level of 3%-10%
                       depending the time of year-simple mite wash of 1/4 cup(300) bees will give you your counts -RDY-B

« Last Edit: December 17, 2010, 12:29:18 AM by rdy-b » Logged
rdy-b
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2219


Location: clayton ca


« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2010, 10:00:20 PM »

That makes sense.  The varroa have an over wintering group that is dormant and has a longer life cycle, just like the bees in the cluster.   

With this in mind, when is the best time to treat?  In the spring when they are weak and just getting started or the fall when you want to reduce the population going into the cluster?
 you say* varoa has a longer life cycle* one thing to remember is that your WINTER BEES will live 90-120 days
as compared to SUMER BEES that live 6 weeks -But once weakened by varoa they have been compromised and so has the longevity of the bee-RDY-B
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2010, 01:23:38 AM »

.  Come January, viable queens begin in earnest to lay eggs, cold or not. 

Our queens start to lay or it is better to say that bees start nurse some larvae at the end of February.
It may be out -20C and bees have a little patch of brood, about 10 cm wide. It happens before cleansing flight.

The queen lay much but bees do not feed larvae.
When I start patty feeding at the beginning of April, they are able to rear 3-4 frames of brood. Not more. It is lack of nurser bees I suppose.

Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
T Beek
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2776


Location: USA, N/W Wisconsin


« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2010, 05:10:47 AM »

For myself, I won't treat unless I see more mites than I have.  And then I'll use powdered sugardusting.  If they still are succumbed by the mites, that'll be that.  I won't treat with chemicals, so I'd let them go.  But that's me.

thomas
Logged

"Trust those who seek the truth, doubt those who say they've found it."
Brian D. Bray
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


WWW
« Reply #14 on: December 24, 2010, 05:12:27 PM »

Once varroa mites get into a hive they will remain regardless of time of year.  In the Spring, Summer, and Fall a good number of bees are shed from the bees from movement (bucked off) and are replenished from the invasion of brood cells.  During the winter there generally is not enough movement amoungst the bees to shake off the mites and transfer from one bee to another is much easier.
My treatment for varroa consists of interrupting the brood cycle, which for Italians usually means splitting the hive or caging the queen, whereas Russian bees do it on their own.  Probably one of the major reasons Russians are more varroa resistant.
Logged

Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
rdy-b
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 2219


Location: clayton ca


« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2010, 09:48:08 PM »


My treatment for varroa consists of interrupting the brood cycle, which for Italians usually means splitting the hive or caging the queen, whereas Russian bees do it on their own.  Probably one of the major reasons Russians are more varroa resistant.
HIT the nail right on the head-man knows his TREATMENTS- Wink RDY-B
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.347 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page November 17, 2014, 04:42:10 PM