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Author Topic: Hand holes for hive  (Read 3421 times)
jorgeldelapaz
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« on: December 11, 2010, 07:59:33 PM »

What should i use to make the hand holes for hives I have read using table saw with dado i would like to use router any ideas
 .I am not a professional carpenter.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2010, 09:46:46 PM »

I have done a plunge cut with a fence and a Dado blade on a table saw.  I have screwed and glued cleats on.  Both work fine.  i have never tried to make the pretty ones you get on the manufactured boxes.
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nella
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« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2010, 07:53:10 AM »

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,27114.0.html
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Tommyt
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« Reply #3 on: December 12, 2010, 10:02:28 AM »

There is an actual cutter/Gouge (burr) made that I believe was made to use or Tires and it does it just like the Pros
I'll do a search and post it.
On a different Bee page one of the Posters said he would sent me a way to do it with Jig and Skill saw
I will post that when it arrives

Tommyt
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jorgeldelapaz
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« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2010, 11:01:01 PM »

Thanks got link to this site were instruction are at
forum.beemaster com index php topic 27114 20 html
Also got a site that sells the Molding Knife Head craftsman dont make them any more.
corobcutters com accessories php
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Tommyt
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« Reply #5 on: December 13, 2010, 10:30:28 AM »

Here is the tool I was talking about and a thread on it.
The website of the tool maker can be confusing but it
seems to be the tool for the Job,I know there are many other ways
I would like to see what Mann Lake (those like ManL) that sell Large volume
Who makes theirs and what is used?
I take no credit in any of this I just copied it all
one of the Links shows the actual Tool
VolunteerK9 Is who knows of it or has the tool?

Good Luck

Tommyt

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http://www.olivercorp.com/rubberhog_products_details.cfm?category_ID=16

http://forum.beemaster.com/index.php/topic,30188.0.html

I found this on another website and thought I would share it here. It seems to be the safest way to cut a factory looking handle in boxes that we build ourselves using a tool made for tire work.

Heres the website for the tool.

http://www.olivercorp.com/rubberhog_products_details.cfm?category_ID=16

And heres the link to the website explaining how they did it.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=245973&page=5


I found this on another website and thought I would share it here. It seems to be the safest way to cut a factory looking handle in boxes that we build ourselves using a tool made for tire work.

Heres the website for the tool.

http://www.olivercorp.com/rubberhog_products_details.cfm?category_ID=16

And heres the link to the website explaining how they did it.

http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=245973&page=5

The poster's screen name is Carlinmo and he has a link to a picture of the handle that it cuts out. The tool however isnt  cheap at all-I know cuz I just ordered one but they are supposed to last a lifetime and I think they would be way safer than the plunge technique on a table saw that Im using now as well as the moulding head cutter that Ive looked into.  This tool is used on a drill press and produces a darn nice looking handle.

Yes, it is expensive and yes I know the arguments of nailing strips on the sides for handles, but I just like the look it produces with less risk of losing a finger or two in the process.
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« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2010, 04:42:47 PM »

I use a plunge router with a 3/4" bit.  I made a wooden jig that limits the movement of the router to the area I want the handhold to be.  I use a c clamp to hold the jig in place and I plunge in 5/8" and make a 5" long handhold.
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blainenay
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« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2011, 03:40:12 AM »

What should i use to make the hand holes for hives....


In the past, I've used a router or a dado blade that I simply plunged into the wood. It makes good handles, but, both methods result in a flat surface that can hold moisture that some say results in rot (I've never had that problem, but I live in the desert).

For what I did with my latest batch of hives, go to YouTube and search for "Bee Hive Box Handle hekla57". I'm very happy with the results.
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« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2011, 08:36:14 AM »

http://robo.bushkillfarms.com/hensel-handle-sloping-pocket-handle-for-hive-boxes/
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JackM
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« Reply #9 on: December 15, 2011, 08:41:38 AM »

Heck if you already have the dado blade, set it wide as you can and just make a cut, put stops at either end.  Fast, easy, no additional expense, but not as fancy as the commercial, works just as good.  Plus you dont have any excess hanging outside if you wish to ship a bunch of them. 

Whatever you do, just be careful, I tried to get fancy and partially amputated a finger, not from the machine, but from kickback and the sharp fresh cut edge of the wood got me just right.  Sooooo be careful!
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« Reply #10 on: December 15, 2011, 09:16:06 AM »

If your wanting the commercial hand hold look, the RubberHog does a very good job replicating one. The biggest plus is that it is way safer than plunge cuts on a table saw or using a sled like the one that nearly took JackM's finger off. The drawback is that they are pricey but they last forever. If they get plugged up, all you do is take a torch and burn the resin and dust back out of it.
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Johnny253
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2012, 08:19:30 AM »

Great idea with the RubberHog. I'm looking into getting one. What size should I get, 3 1/2 or 4 in?
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VolunteerK9
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« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2012, 10:33:27 AM »

Great idea with the RubberHog. I'm looking into getting one. What size should I get, 3 1/2 or 4 in?

Mine is a 3 1/2 and it works really well
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CarlinMO
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« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2012, 09:03:05 PM »

Hive handles with a drill press as mentioned by Tommy T above --  I do not have enough posts to include a URL to my YouTube video that shows how to make handles with a drill press and the flared contour wheel.

Search for my name on Youtube.


Carl Korschgen
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Johnny253
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« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2012, 01:59:20 AM »

Thanks Carl, marvellous invention and great video!

I just want to confirm that the part number I need is 122 with 390 coat (as stated in video), not 120 (as shown in above post).

I know how annoying it is not be able to post photo's or vidoes.

For anyone interested, check out
Hive Handles using a drill press jig
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CarlinMO
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« Reply #15 on: January 12, 2012, 08:16:23 AM »

Johnny253,

Thank you for posting the link.  Part 122 is the correct tool.  I have provided retail sources of the flared contour wheel in the comment section of the video.  Oliver Carbide Products Inc. sells through retailers.

I also appreciate the comments by VolunteerK9 about the safety of my system.  That is exactly why I took a completely different approach to making the hand holes.

Carl Korschgen
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Johnny253
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« Reply #16 on: January 12, 2012, 09:10:11 AM »

Thanks Carl. I totally agree, great system all round.

I'm guessing it would be getting pretty cold where you are now. I visited Missouri University in February a few years back and know how cold it was then! How do your bees fare in such cold weather?
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sawdstmakr
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« Reply #17 on: January 12, 2012, 11:51:17 AM »

Nice Jig Carl.
I am going to replace the one that I made for the table saw. Too dangerous, too easy to mess up and get cut.
Do you have any diagrams with the measurements? This would reduce trial and error work and waste. Again nice jig and presentation.
Jim
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CarlinMO
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« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2012, 02:52:02 PM »

Sawdstmakr,  I don't have any plans drawn up but I think the video pretty well illustrates the jig.  I found that you want the board to drop into the jig with relative ease.  Leave 1/8" all around and just make sure that the horizontal and vertical stops that you push the board against while making the handle are aligned.  I do have a 4-page setup manual that goes with the jigs that I sell.

Johnny253, our winter has been very mild until today.  It is 16 F right now with a wind chill probably less than zero.  Yesterday it was close to 60 and I was putting pollen patties in the hives and bees were flying everywhere.

Carl Korschgen
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yockey5
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« Reply #19 on: January 12, 2012, 03:37:44 PM »

Thank you Carl, that is a nice jig you have made.
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