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Author Topic: Hold on tight, that long and lengthy story of my life, smiling that big smile  (Read 1806 times)
Cindi
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« on: October 16, 2010, 10:08:49 AM »

The time has come the walrus said, to think of many things.

I have been thinking and wondering about how to get such a long and lengthy post of guess what?  Me, yep, right now, it's all about me, me, me, smiling that big smile.  I have spent a good many parts of an hour to compile a story of what has been going on in my life for the past few months, well, actually since June 15.  That day, when we said goodbye to our 20 years of living on our five acres in Maple Ridge, in southwestern British Columbia.  A farewell to the 23 years of being foster parents, and a farewell to many other things in our life.  I have not looked back, the move has been nothing short of a most beautiful thing.  The following story may repeat what I have said in these past few paragraphs, but I had to actually make an thought before I copied and pasted and extremly long story, into what has now become an extremely long post  grin  shocked  cool.  So, grab your popcorn, your coffee, whatever you want to grab, and sit with me for a few minutes.  I will take you down a walk in my life, I will show you things that you can see with your mind's eye, and hope that you enjoy my words.  I have missed all my forum friends for so long, and now I am truly feeling that I have time to come back and visit every morning. Old Man Winter did actually arrive this morning.  We are sitting at 0 C (32F), and as I look out on my patio that Ken built for our little trailer, I can see that the beautiful canna lilies have blackened from the freeze.  It is time now to bring down the flowers that will have been knocked to the ground, pull the bulbs and corms and place them into their warm home for the winter.  The frost can go very deep in this new place in my life.  The water line dug to our home had to be dug four feet deep, on the southwest coast of B.C., the water lines are only dug down 18 inches, that is a significant difference in the depth of the freezing of the land.  Anyways, spend a few minutes with me, you may get a glimpse of how I think I have been too busy to spend time on the internet, my friends --  Smiley  have a most beautiful day, a day of yours, the health that we all love to have, and most of all, love.  Cindi

Phew, all now is said and done.  This may be a repeat of information, that many will have already read about, but being that ramblin’ gal, I must ramble, smiling, that big smile.

I am beginning to relax and now enjoy our new home in our new page of life.  Really, all I can say is phew...smiling.  Our house had been on the real estate market for a year and a half – finally someone that loved to have an almost nearly identical lifestyle as my Husband and myself, (known as Ken) found our home, loved it and made the offer to purchase.  They are foster parents, they love to farm, a very family oriented family, our mirrors of ourselves.  The closing date was June 15 and we were moved out on time, with only a couple of hours to spare.  No clue really how this was accomplished, it really boggles my mind – but we did it.  Our intended move-to-a-new-home, was to live on our oldest Daughter’s property, in an extremely small town, by the name of Grindrod, in the Thompson-Okanagan area of the central south British Columbia.  Close to Salmon Arm and Vernon, two larger towns.  We are living about one half way down her three acres, in a very nice, but small trailer, and we are comfortable, with our dog named Coder (after Ry of course).  It was such a big move.  We had made several massive trips with our truck, which has a canopy, and pulling our Son-in-Law’s flatdeck trailer, the length of approximately 20 feet.  It took about 4 long trips to get all our stuff up to our new home, and the most incredible amount of work I have ever in my life encountered.  The trip one way is approximately 5 hours.  All the stuff that we won’t use until we build our own little home on a small piece of property is stored here in a big 10 X 40 foot container.  It is actually very surprising how much of our  stuff from our old house is stored in our little 10 X 30 trailer.  The trailer has a two  slideouts, which make it much larger, but it is still a very small place, compared to our old house of (five bedrooms)encopassing three stories – a rather large house, for surely.  The strangest thing of all is to leave behind our life of being foster parents.  We have performed that occupation for over 20 years, and now to only be looking after my wonderful Husband, and no other human being, is certainly a very different, but most wonderful change.  We always had four foster children throughout those years,specializing in teenage boys, and it has been a most rewarding lifestyle.  But the page has turned.

We were without internet for a very long time, but eventually it came to pass that we were on line again.  I have had issues upon issues with adjusting to the new e-mail system and new computer, yet alone, to find any time to spend with my forum friends, but I am getting adjusted to a different lifestyle now, and will certainly be finding more time to spend here, among so many that I care so deeply about.  I have missed you all, and I do not say that lightly.

Life is wonderful and we are playing as little children, my wonderful Husband and I, with our Daughters, their Spouses and our Grandsons.  We are having fun, and to have my family so close by, what more could a parent ever ask for.  We are very fortunate that our gals both married men that are mirrors of their Father.  They are happy girls.  Both of their Husbands are mechanics of sport power machines, such as power boats, ski doos, snow sleds – you get the picture.  This is their lives.  This summer we have found lots of time to play with them on the water, as they all own  power water machines.  Wintertime will be a different world of playing with snow mobile machines.  That will be a whole lot of fun too.  Right, forgot to mention, both our Daughters have horses too, so there has been a return to horseback riding for me.  And yes, that has been fun too.

Bees, yep had the gift of two swarms that moved into my empty boxes that laid dormant on our Daughter’s property, as these were the first of the first entities to come to the new home. |We are entering winter with very large sized clusters of many young bees, to carry these two colonies through the winter.  Beekeeping is very different from that way we did so, when we lived on the southwestern coast of our province.  That southwestern area is extremely moist, humid, the summertime average temperature of 25 degrees Celsius.   Our new home is hot, dry, and it didn’t take long for the first swarm to fill an entire deep of honey.  Yes, never in my wildest dreams did I entertain the thought that I would receive any honey from either colony this year.  That second swarm that came to live amongst my other colony, I am surely positive was an afterswarm, as it took quite a time to build up.  But at the last check (my bad, should not have been playing and working so hard), the one deep on that second swarm  had 8 frames of brood.  I moved frames of brood up, placed some drawn comb betwingst the brood frames, and they were happy.  Now a very large colony too.  No honey for the human to take, but lots of young bees.  Winter is fast approaching, the days are cooling and the nights are very cool.  It is the second week in October and we have had that first hard frost, much colder than my previous life’s climate.
I am finding with the cooler weather, I am beginning to find that I have more time to spend doing more insidey –type stuff, and with that comes, well, guess what!!  More internet time, so that actually means that I will find some time to spend here, still not going to hold my breath though.  I know, I know -- idle promises, so I shall not make any promise, just a wish that comes from the bottom of my heart.

This may sound odd, but sometimes I feel like my kids and Grandsons will surely rip me in half, all trying to get a piece of me.  It truly does make me smile though, guessing I never really realized how much they missed their mamma not living close by.  It makes my heart glow, to know that I am loved.  And I am.

The chickens all have been having a great time in their new home, never missed a beat with laying eggs and are still going strong.  Had a broody buff Orpington hen that hatched nine of 12 eggs.  She has seven light Brahma chicks (rats, only 2 pullets, the other cockerals), one splash Cochin cockerel, and one that I have no clue what is, I do know it has furry black legs, a black rose comb, totally black and fluffy, it is a cockerel, so well imagining it is the gold laced Wyandotte rooster crossed with the blue cochin hen, it is turning out to be a most beautiful and interesting looking young bird.  I will probably keep him, just to see what this cross brings about, so far, black as the ace of spades and furry and fluffy, just like the Cochin breed.  It would appear that broodiness seems to go very strong here, smiling.  I have had two more hens go broody, a light Brahma, sitting on blue Cochin eggs and another blue Cochin, that hatched out gold laced Wyandottes (of  course, they were given eggs by the human being).  I couldn’t stop myself, nor control my actions.  I obtained some Buckeye chicken hatching eggs, so set my Sportsman incubator to work, and hatched 30 chicks, Buckeyes, of which there are two pullet and 7 cockerals hatched, a whack of light Brahmas, some Cochins, some are blue, splash and a couple of black (two blue mated Cochins give several colours that come about in the offspring, the splash is a most beautiful coloured bird) and a couple of crosses, (barred rock with gold laced Wyandotte) cockerals, and gonna be some ugilee birds, those are for the table.

This is my first time to raise the Buckeye breed, but they are beautiful, kind of reminiscent of the Rhode Island Red breed in colour,that deep mahogany red --  but sporting a rose comb, the same type of comb as the gold laced Wyandotte.  Very winter hardy birds, as are the light Brahmas with their beautiful pea combs.  This is an interesting note.  I have the light Brahma group separated, and during the hottest of days, when all the other breeds were inside their homes, keeping cool, the Brahmas paid no mind to the heat and continued as if nothing was at all different.  I am quite impressed actually.  A cold and clearly hot weather tolerant breed of bird – that is cool, cause it is both of these climates where I live.

My Daughter, on whose property we live on, is quite close friends with a beekeeper that migrates his bees to Alberta (one province east of ours) for the clover fields, he runs approximately 300 colonies.  He is an older fellow, of whom I, of course have made acquaintance.  At the end of the summer, he brings his bees back to the warmer  winter climate(now isn’t that a joke) of our area, and then takes them back to Alberta the following spring.  He asked if he could move his colonies temporarily to our property, to feed before their five hour journey a little further south, the a place called Osooyos.  Of course, friends help friends and he brought his 300 colonies of bees.  Placed them in a very appropriate area, far out at the back of the property.  The bees stayed only one month, just long enough to fill their boxes with the sugar syrup that would hold them over the winter.  A month is a goodly long enough time to glut on sugar syrup and process to reduce the water content to a safe product within the hive for winter.

His only warning ever to me, and when I receive a warning, I am smart enough to listen.  He mostly runs New World Carniolan, but has a good number of Russian bees.  These Russian bees he has are wonderful for the fields in no man’s land where he summers the bees.  Those fields of clovers and some canola too, that impression I got.  The Russian strain of bee he has are angry bees, they have no tolerance to be bothered, and are great for honey gathering due to the protective nature of themselves.  They forage much earlier in the day that the NWC (which Carniolan forage pretty early in my findings anyways), will forage at a very cold temperature and are great for the honey gather, no so nice to work with.  He has been beekeeping with his Father, whom I would presume is no longer with us in this world, as this fellow must be close to the middle of the 60th year.  His Father and himself ran around 1,500 colonies, and his Daddy had worked some of the best of the best of American bee breeders (I would venture meaning on the western part of the states).  His Father was a massive producer of package bees and this man recalls his Dad moving hundreds upon hundreds of packages of bees cross border, both ways.  It sounds like he may have had big yards in the U.S. too, not too sure.  Well, making this longish story shorter, I have had some wonderful and lengthy conversations with this great man, and have listened with the interest of a child – and he has taught me many tricks of the trade to keep bees within this new life of mine, this new climate, it has been most wonderful.  The bees are gone, and I will probably not see him again until next spring – unless we get together for coffee – hey, I can do that.  I would imagine that his Wife is as interesting as he is – he calls her the old blister – in a most loving way, that is his way, and my life would be complete if I could meet this gal, that clearly his pet name for his beloved Wife, is The Old Blister, and clearly, she is one that must be able to take a little kidding.  My ramblin’, oops, pardon, smiling, but hey, it has been a long time, and I thought I should just make things a little worthwhile.  (Perhaps I should have somehow just put a link to a place to read my story, and before I post this lengthy apparatus, my story, I shall ask a Moderator if I should not place such a long post, hmmm....maybe it would annoy some people, and that would never be my intention.  If this post comes on our forum, you know that permission has been granted, smiling that big smile).

Ken has been so busy, again, his usual wanting to make me happy, revamping the beautiful home that houses my chickens here.  There was a most wonderful initial big shed that our Daughter “gave” us for our chicken uses.  But there were many things that we wanted to add/change to it and it was done, it is nothing short of a palace now.  All set up for young birds and the mature clan, all in one big place.  Big, but not too big to be unnecessary.  And... of course, there must always be more, smiling.  So Ken set his hands and skills to work and made an addition to the red chicken barn, that looks almost identical, a fair amount smaller and not as tall, but it looks like it was always there.  This structure was built whilst my Daughter and her Husband were away for five days at a barrel racing competition in Chilliwack.  They take their horses for competition all over our province, and we caretake their farm here – and it is so much fun – we love it.  So when they returned, had we not mentioned we were building an addition to the chicken house, they would have probably returned and said “hey, something looks different, but what it is?”  It blends so beautifully with the prior existing chicken house.  My man.  Where would my life be without that dude, that would walk those stones of burning fire – to make his Wife happy.  A happy wife makes a most happy life, smiling.  (Remember that guys...hee, hee).  So now, lots and lots of room for my intention of becoming a very smaller breeder of beautiful birds.  My most gorgeous light Brahma rooster, which was incubated from an egg, from Brian Bray, nigh two years ago now – has thrown the most beautiful and biggest light Brahmas I could ever imagine.  This dude is a monsterous size, as are his offspring.  Brian should be very proud of his stock of light Brahma birds that he had.  I am not sure if Brian still has light Brahmas, but he surely did have some beautiful stock that time when I brought home those eggs for my incubator.  My hat off to you Brian, should you be a’readin’ this post.

It is wonderful to live on our oldest daughter's property.  We get along, and always have, famously and I don't think they nor us will tire of us living here.  Perhaps we may never move away and build our own house, I don't know.  The only thing that would cause me to ever want to move away, would be a breakdown in the relationship between my Daughter, her Husband and us, but I believe that would never happen.  We are one.  We love each other all very deeply, and we pull our weight around here.  To help with farm chores and everything as such.  Thanks to my work and my daughter's work, we have a great family garden, which provides food for our tables.  With two taking and sharing these chores, it is so much more simple.  This is everything I have ever wanted in life.  We live in a beautiful valley, on flat ground, green trees and farms everywhere.  This is because of the beautiful river that nourishes this valley. there is no lack of water.  The sun comes up over the mountain early in the morning, I can see it rise and we are in sunshine all day long, until the sun bids farewell, on the other side of the valley.  I have my family so close by.  I have my chickens, my bees, horses (6 of them) to look at, to ride, should I so chose, my Husband, who is that light in my life -- I feel that I have everything I could ever want (did I already mention this, smiling).  This happiness I feel makes living in our small trailer absolutely 100% fine.  It is small, but beautiful, and I would say certainly roomy enough for us.
 
We do not have neighbours.  We have some across the street, but they live far back on their property, and if you asked me, I would not even really know what their house looks like.  We live between two alfalfa fields, which are probably 40 or 60 acres, we are very much secluded in that way.  When I look to the mountain in the east, all I can see is mountain far beyond the alfalfa field, I can see some buildings of some sort, probably someone’s back of their barn, not sure.  There is a manufacturer of livestock feed across the road to the east, it is called Sure Crop, it is quite large, but unobtrusive.  This mill does certainly make some strange noises, and I do at times wonder if there is aliens that live there, smiling.  It shuts down on the weekend, and that is when one realizes that it really does make some noise.
 
When I look to the north, all I can see is a long border of trees, I know there are people living beyond those trees, but they are as we are, on huge acreage, to the south, same thing, just acres of farmland.  Looking to the west I see the mountains, there are a few people that live on the bottompart, on smaller farms, but they are a long ways away.  This is my view of the world.  There is quite a busy highway that we live along, I can see the cars drive by, across the fields, but that does not bother me.
 
The farmer who owns the alfalfa field on the east cuts his crop after it flowers, the other farmer does not allow his to go to flower.  When I walk down to our Daughter's home (which is probably no less than 20 times a day, for this, that or the other thing), well actually I have a bike that I ride, it is so much faster when I am in a hurry, I can smell the beautiful scent of the alfalfa flowers, which are blue.  It is the most incredibly beautiful fragrance.  As I sit on my deck, I can also smell it.  The field recently was cut down, a sad thing, but this must be.  The field on the east side was not cut, but the flowers have long began to perish, as the crop is dying.  The farmer makes his alfalfa crop into enormous round bales (he has already cut once, about a month ago).  It grows about 3 feet in a month.  These bales probably weigh about 300 pounds.  It is convenient for here, as my son in law just gets his forklift and pushes the bales to the storage place on their property, how convenient is that eh?
 
This is an extremely dry and hot climate here, but because of the river, the fields grow like the dickens.  I only see farmers around here irrigating their crops, such as the corn, and so on.  The hay type crops don't appear to be irrigated.  Well, from what I can see anyways.  These alfalfa fields have never had any irrigation on them, and they are green as green can be.
 
In this area, during the afternoon in summertime, there is always a beautiful breeze that strikes up.  It cools things down immensely, and is so nice to sit outside and feel these breezes upon your body.  Our deck is on the east side of our home, so it is in shade after about 1:00 and makes to a most lovely place to sit in the afternoon.  The climate is so different from the humid and wet climate of our former life -- and I love it.  In this fall weather, that breeze no longer is here, the air is mostly still, the summer breezes clearly come from temperatures of warmth.

Our home on the property has a tree separation, which gives us some seclusion.  It is very cool because these trees are the black Elderberry shrubs (sambucus nigri).  The shrubs are about 10 feet tall and very busy and have been loaded with these beautiful big clusters of black berries, of which I have been gathering my heart out.  I sit for hours stripping these little black berries from the umbrels of the stalk and put them in the fridge for later processing.  Ken bought me a slow juicer, an auger style, which extrudes the pulp from one exit and the juice from another.  The berries have been processed and I have mountains of Black Elderberry juice, which I shall make jellies, wine and such things.  It is very good for you, and I am blessed to have these shrubs just outside my very door.  There are still many, many clusters of berries to gather, even though the temperature dropped to the freezing point last night.  It is a pleasant thing, to sit and commune with the berries, although the hands do get a little stained purple, but that is OK, that is me.

Guess that will end my ramblin’s at this time in space, I have rambled for long enough – leaving now with my intention to set routines, and one of those is to bring back that joy that I receive, that elevation in serotonin levels, every time I come to spend with my friends on our forum. Have that beautiful day, the one that brings that smile to your face, which as we all know, makes the most beautiful of days to have and hold, yours, deep within the palm of your hand, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
JP
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« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2010, 10:22:20 AM »

Rock Lady, the heck with all that stuff, what I wanna know is how's Whoppo doing? Have you heard anything?


...JP  grin


















Good to see you in here Cin  Kiss
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Cindi
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« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2010, 10:55:57 AM »

Ah, Sir JP, you and Whoppo, that love lost in time.  He's gone, off to a new breeding ground in life, he is surely happier than he was living with me, still never could figure out how he never got in your dinnerplate, as you would travel, in your mind's eye to my place to nab my turkeys, ducks and chickens  tongue, hee, hee, so glad you never got them all, smiling.  Beautiful days, ones that make your heart fill with that joy that only happy days can bring, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2010, 11:47:33 AM »

so glad to see you back!  was thinking of you again as i observed the fact that the borage you sent me did reseed all over the place!  smiley  sounds like things are going well and i hope they continue that way.  please don't be a stranger anymore!
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2010, 07:27:02 PM »

Thanks for the update. I have missed your ramblings!


Steve
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« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2010, 10:16:45 PM »

Wow Cindi. Glad to see you are back. Did you figure it out yourself (I mean how to get back on) or did the Mods help you out??

(Cindi was having trouble getting back on and had me pm the mods to help her)

Anyway, I just printed out your post so I can read it later while in bed (my favorite time to calm down and catch up on reading) It printed out 6 pages. Wow, I will have a nice story to read.

So happy to see you back my friend.

Love
Annette
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Cindi
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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2010, 09:52:14 AM »

Thank you for the warm welcoming return, my forum friends.  Yep, ramblin's Steve, they are to come, smiling.

Kathy, I told you before, remember, this is beautiful, once you have borage growing on your property, it is yours to have til the very end of time itself.  This can be a thing of beauty for some, other's it may be as a dog's bane,they can become invasive.  Borage has always been a true friend of mine and the bees, so I have never minded  cool  cheesy.  Bring on the borage!!!

Annette, you never cease to make me smile.  I hoped that you grabbed the popcorn last night, whilst you read my story, all snuggled up in bed, you are truly a diamond in the sky.  Thank you for helping me to get back on the forum, it was Robo that emailed me, he had reset my password, and lo a behold, when I logged in, here I was, and here I will be, beauty. So, now off to read some posts, spend some beautiful time here, greet a few new people, make a greeting to any and all that I have missed that have joined for the past few months, beautiful days, with many more to come, to have with that wonderful and great health, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2010, 11:16:17 AM »

Have you heard from the new people who bought your house?

How they enjoying that mountain of rocks you built?  lau


...JP  Wink
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« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2010, 11:25:52 AM »

Welcome back!

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

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« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2010, 11:34:58 AM »

JP, nope, probably never will, and I have always wondered what they would indeed do with the pile of rocks, surely was a bit pile, I must say myself, been starting a new one here, but they aren't as big to throw, smiling.  Doubt if I will ever match that huge pile again.  Runnning off to let out my chickens, have that most awesome day, with health wishes.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2010, 08:16:00 PM »

Welcome back! I have always enjoyed your joyful, peaceful posts! We have light Brahmas, too, and they have just become my favorite of all chicken breeds--and we have had many!

We also are fostering children, so if you ever have a chance I would love to hear about your experiences!

luvin'honey
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Location: Grindrod, B.C. Canada


« Reply #11 on: October 22, 2010, 10:57:13 AM »

Welcome back! I have always enjoyed your joyful, peaceful posts! We have light Brahmas, too, and they have just become my favorite of all chicken breeds--and we have had many!
We also are fostering children, so if you ever have a chance I would love to hear about your experiences!
luvin'honey

Luvin'honey, thank you for your kind words.  The light Brahmas are indeed my favourite, but just after that comes my Cochins, I raise the blue, and they are a magnificent and wonderfully docile and kind bird, as the Brahmas.  I wonder if the other colours of Brahmas are the same in nature as the light.  I would imagine so.  I just had a mamma Brahma hatch out two of the five eggs I gave her.  I didn't want many more babies for the winter, as I have a whole whack of them already, about 40 of them that are beebopping along.  They are a mixture of light Brahmas, cochins (blue X blue gives splash, blue and black offspring), so have some splash, blue and black cochins, some gold laced wyandotte crossed with barred rock, ugilee as ugilee can be -- the dad is the parent and these cockerals have a rose comb with the barred look, very ugly birds, that cross is not good, well, in my eyes anyways.  The gold laced wyandotte crossed with a blue cochin is beautiful, I have about 5 of the crosses the others are pure.  This particular cross is a totally black bird, feathered as the cochin, but has a rose comb, which is black as the ace of spade.  I think I will be keeping him, just a point of interest, because of his beauty -- he'll stay out of the breeding pens.  The light brahma mother brought her two, three day old babies out into the Brahma chicken yard yesterday, and not nary a soul paid any mind to them, not even the magnificent rooster, he was curious, but that was that, such gentle giants and so cold and hot hardy, as I said, they were out foraging in the hottest of the days last summer, whilst everyone else in the other pens were hiding.  Love them.  The tales of our fostering could fill many books, I doubt if I would ever find any time to speak of our adventures, just too many other things in life to do, smiling, sorry to say that, but true.  Good luck with taking care of others' children.  It is a most wonderful thing to do, and we know, so many children just need to be loved.  Beautiful days, of love, health and sharing.  Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #12 on: October 22, 2010, 12:53:56 PM »

Thanks Smiley

That's what I love most about the Brahmas--their hardiness. Ours have even been sleeping outside on nights in the 30s. They're the first out and the last in every day, foraging like crazy Smiley Take care!
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« Reply #13 on: November 20, 2010, 02:24:06 AM »

Hi  Cindi,

You're correct, I no longer have the Light Brahma but have gone to Dark Brahma, Dark Cornish, Black Jersey Giant and Austrolorp.  Remember that 4 way cross I told you I wanted to develop, I now have the starter stock.
The Dark Brahma hens are like little old ladies (ie my grandmother) dressed in 1920's style white lace over black dresses, dainty comes to mind, if that fits a large chicken.  I have roosters as big as my hen turkeys and it is hard to tell which is which once the heads and feathers are removed.

Can you tell me name of your beekeeper friend?  Back in the 60-80s there was a real well known beekeeper in Alberta that ran upwards to 3000+ hives (which was a huge operation in those days), many in the Dakota's, Wyoming, etc, who had one of the largest bee package operations in either the US or Canada.  You could even buy his bees through Sears & Roebuck and Montgomery Ward catalogs.  I think your friend is the son of that man, but for the life of me I can't remember his name.

Glad you're having so much fun with your new farm.

Brian    Brian
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« Reply #14 on: November 22, 2010, 11:11:18 AM »

Brian, somehow you did something really odd with that icon at the beginning of the post, I had noticed it before, where it said "Hi Cindi" and then the next time I looked it showed "Hi and then an icon with that shovel and pitch fork" odd, what did you do?  I notice the oddest things sometimes.

Yes, I clearly recall the cross that you wanted to make for that massively big fowl for the dinner plate, sounds like you are almost there, smiling that big smile.  The dark Brahmas are a very beautiful bird, and I can relate to what you say about them looking like little old ladies for surely.

Ah, that beekeeper you speak of, I am sure that it is the family that you recall.  They were Alberta-origin.  This man's name is Bill Rogers.  He is in his 60s now, I am pretty sure his  Father is now passed from this life.  Does this name ring that bell with you?  They did have package bees that they sold all over the US and I bet this is the same family.  Such a nice man, and I listened to his ramblings to me for so long, on several occasions, I love to listen, you know that.

Yep, Brian, having a blast in this lil' ol' world.  You take care, have that most wonderful day, full of health, love, friendship and peace, Cindi
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
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« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2010, 10:51:18 PM »

Cindi,

Every emoticon has a name such as : grin:  to give you  grin.  When you are typing in the reply window and you see all those emoticons above the window and click on [more] a window pops up to show a good number of additional emoticons.  Click on  Cindi then look at the dialogue window under the arrow; then click on  Brian and do the same thing.  Or look at the image placed on your reply window.

The Mod's, in their perverse humor, when choosing those additional emoticons, gave some of them names with Rohr type test associations.  

It comes about because the reply window is set up accept webpage scripting so that [] with  
Quote
in between opens up a quote window and using [] with /quote (unquote) in between ends the quote window.

Rogers is the name, he and I, if I remember correctly are about the same age (early to mid 60s).


Until the next time....The snow and wind storm (definition of a blizzard)of yesterday is over but the temps outside are around 15F right now, which would be what -9C?  It only hit the San Juan Island/Bellingham area on the south side of the border but I hear both Vancouver Island and Vancouver City got it pretty good.  With 40-50 mph winds the chill factor was put the temps in the -15C or below catagory.  The rest of Western Washington just got snow.
« Last Edit: November 24, 2010, 12:21:22 AM by Brian D. Bray » Logged

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« Reply #16 on: November 28, 2010, 11:45:05 PM »

I will comment more later, Brian, yes, I think that you and Bill Rogers are of the same year of age.  I have established a very good relationship with Bill, and I am sure that he is the Son of whom you speak.  You would have both been bred of the same great generation, I am the same, just a few years short of you, smiling.
Sorry, still don't get the emoticon thing, you mean that I have a certain emoticon attached to my name, i.e. Cindi, honestly, I highly doubt it.

I want to get to know Bill better.  The stories that he told me of his Father, so long ago, made me shiver.  It made me feel so proud of him, and what his Daddy had done with the beekeeping industry, so many, many, years ago, as he made and transported his packages from California to the Canadian homes, for many bees.

My Son-in-Law, of whom whose property that we live on -- had some time ago, perhaps maybe two years ago, had made a marvelous and most beautiful adaption to a quad, or something of that like, for Bill's Stepson, as this young man had a serious accident at work, and required some machine-assisted mechanism to allow him to play with these adult mobile toys that prior to his injury he loved to do, but could no longer do.  This choice, to help Bill's Stepson have some dignity and more happiness in life, I believe,  has made Bill very fond of my Son-in-Law.  These are random thoughts, I am compelled to impart.  C.
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There are strange things done in the midnight sun by the men who moil for gold.  The Arctic trails have their secret tales that would make your blood run cold.  The Northern Lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see, what the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge, I cremated Sam McGee.  Robert Service
Brian D. Bray
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Posts: 7369


Location: Anacortes, WA 98221

I really look like this, just ask Cindi.


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« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2010, 02:17:56 AM »

Cindi,

Yes, there really is an emoticon named Cindi  Cindi one named Brian  Brian  and another named Jerry  Jerry

Ask Bill if he can remember is father ever talking to or of a NW Wahington Beekeeper named Clayton Turniseed.  Clayton died in 1970 but was a well known beekeeper and equipment manufacturer, kind of the Michael Bush of his era.  He was one of my mentors.  He was also a Cherokee Indian, growing up in Indian Territory (before statehood).
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Life is a school.  What have you learned?   Brian      The greatest danger to our society is apathy, vote in every election!
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