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Author Topic: Missing chicken  (Read 11661 times)
JP
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« Reply #20 on: December 02, 2010, 12:23:26 PM »



Yeah, well my Mama and yours must be related! Now that's a scary thought.  Kiss


...JP
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annette
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« Reply #21 on: December 02, 2010, 08:53:18 PM »



OH you mean Schawee got them!! shocked shocked He turns to chickens when he can't get to his shakes!!
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Brian D. Bray
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« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2010, 01:40:20 AM »

A mink or weasel will trying to carry a chicken away and will drag it back the way it came in, so if you find a chicken lodged in the fence or under the building that is the place to set the trap for the next visit.
Rats are another problem to most poultry houses as they can get into seemly air tight buildings.  A rat like to eat a bird's head and neck, then the crop.  From there they will tunnel through the wishbone to the entrails which they will consume before devouring the rest of the bird.  One or two rats will eat the neck and head, maybe the crop. Three or four will eat the insides out of a chicken.  Half a dozen will consume the entire chicken and leave only the feathers.  Eight to ten will even eat the feathers.  Rats will act in a pack choosing a chicken, attacking it, and eating it together.  If a pacl of rats gets a taste for chicken they will eat 2-3 a week depending on the size of the pack.
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winginit
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« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2010, 02:26:01 PM »

will act in a pack choosing a chicken, attacking it, and eating it together.  If a pacl of rats gets a taste for chicken they will eat 2-3 a week depending on the size of the pack.

Yikes, something new to worry about. Hadn't even considered that possibility. Luckily we don't have rats (that I know of). Yeah right.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #24 on: December 16, 2010, 02:17:13 PM »

I have had a bunch of dead chickens lying around....... Dog or dogs.

Coyotes usually get a chicken a day or two days, but they will usually leave feathers behind.

I started having little chicks disappear, and some of the larger chicks. Turned out it was a cat. The neighbors noticed it before I did, as their cat was dragging up chickens. They got rid of the cat. Was kind enough to asked if they owed me anything.

OH! Here it is legal to shoot what ever it is that is getting your chickens.  evil
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danno
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« Reply #25 on: December 16, 2010, 03:05:54 PM »

Earlier in this thread I mentioned that dogs had killed 75 of my chickens one late season snow storm.   I didn't finish the story of that day.   I called the sheriff.   They came out and wrote a report.  I then called my township supervisor and he came over and took a statement and say the evidence that it was indeed dogs.   Our county has a dog Lic and registation program so If you can prove it was dogs that killed any stock and they are not caught the county will pay.  They bought me 75 new started layers.   
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winginit
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« Reply #26 on: December 17, 2010, 07:32:38 AM »

Here in our county, a man just got $380 from the county commissioners as a reimbursement for 35 chickens that were killed by a fox. "Commissioner Bob Proud said according to Ohio law, if a wild animal kills livestock, the owner can petition the county commissioners for reimbursement."

We're incensed (incensed, I tell you). I wouldn't ask for reimbursement for my chickens that disappear. The county can't afford to reimburse everyone and it's our responsibility to protect our chickens. And when the predators win, well, they get a good meal and we get more careful. 

No word on what evidence was produced to show it was a fox.

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danno
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« Reply #27 on: December 17, 2010, 08:06:11 AM »

Here in our county, a man just got $380 from the county commissioners as a reimbursement for 35 chickens that were killed by a fox. "Commissioner Bob Proud said according to Ohio law, if a wild animal kills livestock, the owner can petition the county commissioners for reimbursement."

We're incensed (incensed, I tell you). I wouldn't ask for reimbursement for my chickens that disappear. The county can't afford to reimburse everyone and it's our responsibility to protect our chickens. And when the predators win, well, they get a good meal and we get more careful. 

No word on what evidence was produced to show it was a fox.


If I was a commissioner this would be in question.   A fox would chase, catch, kill and leave with one chicken.   It would take over a month for a single fox to kill, drag away and eat 35 chickens.   Dog on the other hand dont eat them so after biting and shaking, thye drop the bird and chase another.   They wont quit until the fun stops.
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winginit
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« Reply #28 on: December 18, 2010, 03:20:10 PM »


[/quote]
If I was a commissioner this would be in question.   a fox would chase, catch, kill and leave with one chicken.   It would take over a month for a single fox to kill, drag away and eat 35 chickens.   Dog on the other hand dont eat them so after biting and shaking, thye drop the bird and chase another.   They wont quit until the fun stops.
[/quote]

I wish you were a commissioner! I might have to bring this up with them.
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BjornBee
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« Reply #29 on: December 18, 2010, 07:41:26 PM »

Well we have not lost another chicken.

We did notice a dog on the property however. Where it came from, I have no clue. It ran off when it saw someone.

At this point, I'm glad we only lost one.
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Acebird
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« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2010, 02:40:08 PM »

Quote
OH! Here it is legal to shoot what ever it is that is getting your chickens. 


I think not.  Federally protected species are still protected.

We lost one EE recently (within a month) with no evidence.  It happens.  The coop door is key.  It has to be closed and locked at night.
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Never thought I would do it!
winginit
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« Reply #31 on: December 19, 2010, 09:09:14 PM »

Ground is snow covered here, and thus I've discovered that we have a regulary visitor, likely coyote (suppose it could be a dog but I doubt it). Seems to like the compost pile (go figure) but is all over the property, checking out the hives too. No wonder the cats are so skittish. Nothing like a good snowfall to track the wildlife.

Need a puppy for Christmas.

Bjorn, so glad you aren't losing any more chickens!
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iddee
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« Reply #32 on: December 19, 2010, 09:44:50 PM »

Acebird, a simple request for a livestock protection permit allows killing of protected predators other than the bald eagle. Hawk and bear permits are easily gotten here.
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Acebird
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« Reply #33 on: December 20, 2010, 08:30:17 AM »

We live within the city limits.  It's pretty restrictive what you can do around here.  We once got turned in (suspicious behavior) because someone saw us burying dog poop in our woods.  By the time you file permits and deal with government officials your live stock will be dead.  Then you will need more permits to bury them.

Best plan is to make sure your coop is structurally sound, get your birds in at night (they will go automatically) then close and lock the door.  Wild animals are no different than anything else on earth.  They look for opportunity.  If you make it hard to get at your birds they will move on to a better opportunity.
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Never thought I would do it!
iddee
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« Reply #34 on: December 20, 2010, 08:42:31 AM »

Location...Location...Location....

Here I have had the law ask me to shoot crippled, dieing animals in the city limits since they had to file too many reports if they fired their weapon.

Some officials down here still have a bit of good ol" common sense.

Up there, I think the saying is... Fences make good neighbors.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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skatesailor
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« Reply #35 on: December 27, 2010, 03:41:40 PM »

I plowed the driveway and noticed some tracks from the road came in about 10 ft and turned around. Plowed the barnyard and was finishing up the dooryard when my son spottted a fox at the top of the driveway. I chased it three times with the plow only to have it return and start out to the barn. By the time we got to the barn it was in the stalls looking. Luckily my grandson had locked the chickens away. He will not be returning.  evil
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BjornBee
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« Reply #36 on: January 01, 2011, 08:45:00 PM »

After not losing a chicken for a couple weeks, lost two in the past 48 hours. Tomorrow, I'll be putting on the top net to the chicken run and access will be limited until we get something in the traps.

This time we found a pile of feathers in the next field over. Nothing but feathers, but something had a good time.

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hardwood
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« Reply #37 on: January 01, 2011, 08:53:57 PM »

Pile of feathers...that sounds like a coon.

Scott
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BjornBee
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« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2011, 09:01:27 PM »

I got a perfect farm for them......and it's not mine.  grin
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AllenF
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« Reply #39 on: January 01, 2011, 09:03:55 PM »

Hawk will just leave feathers also.   Set some traps out and be loaded for bear.
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