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Author Topic: beehive wood?  (Read 9609 times)

Offline Dracono

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beehive wood?
« on: November 12, 2010, 12:53:46 AM »
Whats the best type of wood to use to build beehives out of? Pine, oak, cider, cypress?
thanks,
Dracono
Dracono

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2010, 07:22:12 AM »
Free wood is always the best  kind... cheap wood is the next best kind...
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Offline tecumseh

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2010, 08:26:13 AM »
I would rate your various choices as cypress is the prettiest and most durable wood when properly treated and then any of  your western varieties of pine.  both the above are also light wood (per volume) which also means the wood working operation are easier to accomplish.
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Offline VolunteerK9

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2010, 09:23:50 AM »
Wouldn't suggest the oak unless you have one heckuva good back. Cyprus weathers good as is, however pine is easier to work with.

Offline alfred

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2010, 10:02:17 AM »
I have to agree with Free or Cheap.

Offline HomeBru

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2010, 11:03:14 AM »
Free wood is always the best  kind... cheap wood is the next best kind...

+1 !!

In Aridzona, not sure what's "local" but I'd guess any of a few varieties of pine are available. If you have a local sawmill they're usually very aware of the qualities of what they cut and can make some suggestions.

Here in northern Indiana, it's all hardwood, so I usually watch the big box stores for sales on pine boards.

J-

Offline David McLeod

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2010, 11:06:40 AM »
One that I believe would equal or surpass cypress for longevity is old growth heart pine (longleaf) but the weight would be equal to or greater than oak. Machinability is good as long as the tools are sharp and kept clear of rosin. The dwindling supply of this would make it costly unless you happen to stumble into old barn boards or the like that are coming from a demolition.
The distinguishing feature of heart pine is dense growth rings and high rosin content (enough rosin content that termites avoid the stuff). The downside is that it burns hot due to the rosin and is even more flamable than most woods.
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Offline Buz Green

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2010, 12:02:46 PM »

I like cedar 'cause I don't have to paint it.
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Offline ronwhite3030

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2010, 12:21:09 PM »
I am on the free or cheap wagon. i use pine, cherry , oak, redwood, maple, whatever will make a box, bottom board, inner cover or frames. save the scraps because one scrap from one part will make another part.

Offline Tommyt

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2010, 12:28:12 PM »
Whats the best type of wood to use to build beehives out of? Pine, oak, cider, cypress?
thanks,
Dracono

 I don't think Redwood was mentioned but I say its one of great woods.
But you would need Donald trump's pocket too buy any decent amounts :shock:
 I just found some cheap cypress, excited too make a few box's with it.

Tom
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Offline AllenF

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2010, 03:08:16 PM »
Teak wood or mahogany wood is nice woods, but I have never seen them in the free to cheap pile.  Pine is great and I what I do find in the free to cheap pile.  All my boxes are pine or cypress. 

Offline lenape13

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #11 on: November 12, 2010, 03:29:12 PM »
I actually have one made from aluminum.  It was in a former beekeeper's small outyard for several years, and was the one of his most active hives.  He died, then the bees died, and I ended up with it.  I'm going to give it a try next year and see what happens.  Maybe he was on to something... no paint, no rot...hmmm?

Offline AllenF

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #12 on: November 12, 2010, 03:34:45 PM »
Have you got a couple of pics of the aluminum hive?   Something I like to see.

Offline VolunteerK9

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2010, 03:40:05 PM »
save the scraps because one scrap from one part will make another part.

Absolutely

Offline David McLeod

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2010, 06:07:30 PM »
Here's a couple, three more from memory that would meet the rot resistant standard. American Chestnut, often used for fences and the preferred wood for caskets back when it was available. Black Locust, if it could be found in large enough pieces it is very rot resistant as I have used it for untreated fence posts and have gotten fifteen years of solid service almost as good with the same size of lumber issue is Red Mulberry in the same application.
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Offline Dracono

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #15 on: November 12, 2010, 06:50:34 PM »
I would love to see pics of the aluminum bee hive also.
Dracono

Offline Dracono

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #16 on: November 12, 2010, 06:55:53 PM »
also sorry I havent had a chance untill now to update my info on my Location... I am no longer in Az. I am now in Springfield, Mo.
thanks for all of the help guys.
Dracono
Dracono

Offline AllenF

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #17 on: November 12, 2010, 07:26:27 PM »
Here's a couple, three more from memory that would meet the rot resistant standard. American Chestnut, often used for fences and the preferred wood for caskets back when it was available. Black Locust, if it could be found in large enough pieces it is very rot resistant as I have used it for untreated fence posts and have gotten fifteen years of solid service almost as good with the same size of lumber issue is Red Mulberry in the same application.

I would like to see pics of the American Chestnut also.   I know here in Georgia most all of what was still standing was cut for acid wood well over 50 years ago. 

Offline David McLeod

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #18 on: November 12, 2010, 07:28:18 PM »
Of the oaks white over red. White Oak is the wood of choice for slat boxes used for commercial catfishing and is the preferred wood for coopers (barrel makers).
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Offline David McLeod

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Re: beehive wood?
« Reply #19 on: November 12, 2010, 07:35:47 PM »
American Chesnut is a nice straight grained wood. I understand that it also machines well. I wouldn't as I only see it in small pieces from time to time. It is mainly available as "wormy" chestnut which is old salvage wood with powder post beetle damage. Very popular with crafters of small items such as boxes and turkey calls since large lumber is just about gone.
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