Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
August 22, 2014, 01:55:02 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: the old wax issue  (Read 2821 times)
carolina bee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 10

Location: Wilmington,NC


« on: February 02, 2009, 03:24:35 PM »

I'm sure that this subject has been discussed many times over-- My question is -- What do you ? or how do you ? feel is the most effective way to render old wax or cappings. Do you have two separate  "meltdowns" ( one for each) ? Do you prefer double boilers or is the solar wax melter the way to go??   Also, what do you find is the best storage container?
Logged
jsmob
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 114


Location: Sacramento, Ca


« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 07:58:48 PM »

 With cappings and new wax you can't beet solar. With old wax the best way to get as much wax out of the cocoons is to put it in very hot water, I don't think it needs to be boiling, and then press it. The more pressure you applie the better. Like wring out a mop. You won't get all the wax out, but you will get the better part of it.
Logged
kathyp
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 15077


Location: boring, oregon


« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 09:23:45 PM »

i suspend my wax in a double thickness of cheese cloth and melt it over a double boiler.  the wax drips into the water and when it is cooled you can lift the disk out easily.

<table style="width:auto;"><tr><td></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">From wax cake</td></tr></table>

if the wax is really dirty, it will take more than one straining.  

be careful not to put to much water in the boiler or you end up with wax boiling over on your stove.  trust me.  that sucks a lot!
Logged

.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
jdpro5010
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 290


Location: Leetonia, Ohio


« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2009, 12:56:12 PM »

I have always just thrown frame and all into the solar wax melter.  I suppose if you want to get more wax you could then remelt the shell of cocoons and wax like the others suggest in a double boiler.  I know it sure takes alot of the work out of cleaning the wax out of the frames.
Logged
gmcharlie
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 244


Location: Southern IL


« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2009, 09:38:03 AM »

I have been using the microwave,  sounds silly but works great.   just have to be careful like making soup,  don't heat to fast or you get hot spots.   Actually used mine for cappings still wet with honey (instead of rinsing)  The wax and honey separate,  feed the honey back to the bees.   Seemed  smarter than rinsing honey down the drain when feeding syrup is so expensive.
Logged
BMAC
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 615

Location: Upstate NY Schoharie county


WWW
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2009, 03:16:07 PM »

I dont think I would condone feeding carmelized honey back to the bees, but I do something similar.  I just make carmel flavored mead out of that honey.  It ferments fine and with a small stick of vanilla in it tastes wonderful.

Your wax will float with your honey and debris on the bottom.  Make sure you filter out the debris from your honey.  we wait till the cakes barely solidify and removed them leaving the honey warm and easily filters thru the normal bucket filters.
Logged

God Bless all the troops
Semper Fi Marines!
gmcharlie
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 244


Location: Southern IL


« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2009, 10:33:16 AM »

That is teh trick to the microwave,  Don't cook it so hot it carmelizes......   I probably didn't explain that well....  I have  kept the honey for my toast as well as sometimes feeding it back,  but The trick was to warm it slow enough it didn't boil and carmelize.   we use the same method for crystalized honey.  warming slowly until its clear again.

Charlie
Logged
carolina bee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 10

Location: Wilmington,NC


« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2009, 06:33:34 AM »

thanks for the insight  !!!  for those with solar wax melter's-- did you buy one or make it?? I've seen the plans on beesource.com but just haven't tried to do it yet.
Logged
jsmob
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 114


Location: Sacramento, Ca


« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2009, 12:57:27 PM »

Quote
I have always just thrown frame and all into the solar wax melter.  I suppose if you want to get more wax you could then remelt the shell of cocoons and wax like the others suggest in a double boiler.  I know it sure takes alot of the work out of cleaning the wax out of the frames.


This is the best way to render wax for a backyard beek. But after I do this I will do the press because in the old comb it seems an awful lot of wax is left behind.

Quote
for those with solar wax melter's-- did you buy one or make it?? I've seen the plans on beesource.com but just haven't tried to do it yet.


 Try this link. beekeeperlinda.blogspot.com/2007/06/video-on-how-to-use-simple-solar-wax.html

Linda has some great idea's and she presents them very well. This is an inexpensive way to build one.
Logged
carolina bee
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 10

Location: Wilmington,NC


« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2009, 03:44:34 PM »

Thanks JS, what a great way render wax. I have all the components around the house so the only thing keeping me back is the weather !!! I will  share this with others in our beekeepers club.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13622


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #10 on: February 10, 2009, 10:35:30 PM »

>Do you have two separate  "meltdowns" ( one for each) ?

Yes.

> Do you prefer double boilers or is the solar wax melter the way to go??   

If I HAD one I'm sure I'd prefer the solar wax melter. Smiley  but I don't.  I also don't have the double boiler.  Smiley  So some water in the bottom of the pan will have to do.

>Also, what do you find is the best storage container?

1/2 gallon milk cartons.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Grandma_DOG
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 329


Location: Austin, TX

Build it, and they will comb.


WWW
« Reply #11 on: May 14, 2009, 04:37:17 PM »

I really think i"m missing the lions share of wax from brood comb. In doing research, I read about keeping the cocoon/slumgum seperate to send off later to a procesor who deals with Slumgum. Now the book I was reading was old, I don't even know if slumgum processors still exist.

So what I do now is throw it all in the solar wax melter (except pollen comb gets soaked in a tub first to get rid of wax absorbing pollen) and let it melt, then every week or so I scrap off the slum gum and store it.  When I have a few dozen pounds some year, I'll boil it and press it in a homemade press.  But I'll not bother with it till then.
Logged

Wits End
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 99


Location: Carrollton Mississippi


« Reply #12 on: November 05, 2010, 07:04:25 PM »

I have used Lindas solar wax melter made from stuff I had around the house. It worked perfect and the wax is well filtered. I save slumgum for my bait hives.
Logged

Jeff and Kellie Houston
Wits End Blueberry and Bee Farm
Greenwood Mississippi
L Daxon
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 669


Location: Oklahoma City


« Reply #13 on: November 05, 2010, 09:20:33 PM »

I have been using the microwave,  sounds silly but works great.   just have to be careful like making soup,  don't heat to fast or you get hot spots.   Actually used mine for cappings still wet with honey (instead of rinsing)  The wax and honey separate,  feed the honey back to the bees.   Seemed  smarter than rinsing honey down the drain when feeding syrup is so expensive.

I have done mine in the microwave for years.  I crush and strain so I have lots of wax.  I let the wax strain a couple of days so it looks fairly dry, stirring occasionally.  Then I dump the wax into a glass bowl and pop it in the microwave with a thermometer so I can keep an eye on the temperature.  Have to check on it a couple of times and stir to make sure it heats evenly.

The wax floats to a nice solid layer on the top.  When cooled there will be sludge at the bottom of the wax layer which has to be scrapped off and tossed.  I restrain the honey that is left in a very fine strainer and consider it "processed" since it was heated, so I use it in baking.

It is amazing how much honey is still in the wax even though it looks fairly dry.
Logged

linda d
alfred
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 420


Location: Loveland Colorado USA


WWW
« Reply #14 on: November 06, 2010, 09:38:48 AM »

I put everything left after crush and strain into a  5 gal bucket that has water in it enough to cover the wax. Then I put that bucket into a large canning pot with water for double boiler effect. Once the all is liquified I pour it through a paint strainer bag suspended into another bucket. Then the strainer bag can be squeezed to get all of the wax out, careful it's hot, and the junk can be tossed.

Once the water and wax has separated and cooled you will find that most of the left over gunk is in a layer on the underside of the wax and can be scraped off. You can then melt again and run it through finer strainning if you want.

 Always use water with the wax so that it doesn't get stuck to the bottom of the bucket and be sureto use something to elevate the bucket off of the bottom of the canning pot or it will melt.
Logged
Acebird
Field Bee
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 955


Location: Utica, NY

Just getting started


« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2010, 04:57:26 PM »

I have used Lindas solar wax melter made from stuff I had around the house. It worked perfect and the wax is well filtered. I save slumgum for my bait hives.

I have a dumb question (I am new).  What is slumgum?
Logged

Never thought I would do it!
hardwood
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3482


Location: Osteen, Fl (just south of Daytona)

Alysian Apiaries youtube.com/MrBeedude


« Reply #16 on: November 23, 2010, 05:21:42 PM »

"Slumgum" is all the dark crap that's left after rendering wax. It's mostly old cocoons dust and dirt and appears slimy when rendering.

Scott
Logged

"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13622


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #17 on: November 23, 2010, 09:57:01 PM »

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesterms.htm#s
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 1.151 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page August 09, 2014, 07:22:35 AM
anything