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Author Topic: I need HELP/ Ideas on Giant Hive Hanging from a Limb  (Read 2731 times)
Tommyt
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« on: October 17, 2010, 05:01:30 PM »

I only saw two like this in my life 30 years ago it was in the news paper and I realized it was in my Neighborhood
so I went and watched it on and off till it was removed
 Now when I met this Guy I was there to put my Bees in his Yard and Look at what he said was a Hive in a Tree
over the Phone I told him I had a Vac or would Trap out
I walked down the ally and looked up and was shocked to see this thing hanging off 2-2 inch Oak Limbs it is just about 4 foot and I guess 2 1/2 at the largest point
So what do I do Smoke and cut comb OR cut the Hive down by Putting a box up on it and Cutting the Limbs
Then what ?? Fly JP down for a weekend removal
My trapped out bee hive now lives on this Land I have a Pick of it also ,Found out
 Illegal to keep bees where I live angry  But I am keeping a little hive ssshh!


















New trapout Home
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backyard warrior
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« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2010, 05:09:18 PM »

that is one freaking huge ass bee hive i love it Smiley
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backyard warrior
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« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2010, 05:10:58 PM »

Personally i would smoke them and cut the comb to fit frames instead of dropping the hive into a box u will have a huge mess. I would take the time to cut each comb individually good luck Smiley
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kathyp
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« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2010, 05:18:36 PM »

yup.  i'd treat it as a cut out.  no different except no demolition to do  grin
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« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2010, 05:25:22 PM »

Now that is one huge hive. I would smoke, cut, rubberband, insert into hive box and have fun doing it. What a great picture.
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Tommyt
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« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2010, 05:49:19 PM »

I didn't mention its about 15 ft up  grin
I maybe able to set a scaffold in the back of my truck ?


Tom
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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2010, 05:56:06 PM »

Those are some cool pics (except for the last one, it looks illegal  Wink).     You could treat it like a cut out and take it down frame by frame.  But if it was me, I wouldn't.   I would cut down the whole freakin limb and place it in my front yard for all to see.  If the bees are not in a hive, then is it legal?   Very cool looking.
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hardwood
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« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2010, 06:01:19 PM »

I've done quite a few like that...treat it like any other cut out. When setting scaffolding (I use a boom truck) make sure you have access to as much of the comb as possible. I like to remove the outside combs from both sides (which are usually storage combs) until I get to the brood combs. Pare away as much of the honey/drone brood from the brood combs and rubber band the worker brood into frames.

Scott
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asprince
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« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2010, 06:58:24 PM »

Be sure to orient the comb the same way that it was hanging in the tree. I would use scaffolding even if I had to stack them. Please do not attempt this job from a ladder.

 
Good Luck!

Steve
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JP
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« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2010, 07:17:05 PM »

A good candidate for scaffolding. As the others said just treat it like a cut out but expect to lose a lot of comb due to the fact that external colony comb sections are attached to each other and limbs, branches, etc...

If you have frames with drawn comb by all means bring them with you. The bees will appreciate these.

After the transfer, leave the new set up atop the scaffolding for a few days to allow the bees to orient to the box and secure combs.

Seal them at night and take them to jail with you.  grin

If you want to fly me there to help...


...JP  Wink
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Tommyt
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« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2010, 07:55:31 PM »

As to the Location If I were to leave a scaffold it wouldn't be there come morning
I'd have to go Buy it back from the Scarp yard or Pawn Shop
and the Bees would be on the Ground

After the Removal Could I leave a small hive Box Hanging in the tree with some Brood comb for a day or 2
then combine it .The bee yard is about 100yds from where the Tree is
One more Should I Clip the Branch after removal, or after the over night brood comb box
 If you think I should leave the Brood box

Thanks
Tom
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JP
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« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2010, 08:17:43 PM »

What I posted is the ideal situation but in lieu of what you just stated...

Do the removal in the early evening.

Reduce some of your scaffolding and set the box up, cut the limb and let them orient.

Seal them up at night and take them with you.

Whatever works.


...JP
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asprince
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« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2010, 08:27:36 PM »

Chain the scaffolding to the tree and post signs " DANGER KILLER BEES.....STAY BACK for YOUR SAFETY". lau


Steve
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Tommyt
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« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2010, 08:33:23 PM »

JP you say do it early evening ??
I was thinking Early A M then Leave the scaffold all day with Hive on top

 I am so new to this you say orient them self's

YOU mean this so they won't go out the next morning and end up returning to the tree
opposed to the New Hive Local 100 yards away?

 The Guy who has the land may hire someone to stay out there if I tell him its needed
He's all about saving them
« Last Edit: October 17, 2010, 09:27:45 PM by Tommyt » Logged

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TwoHoneys
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« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2010, 08:41:00 PM »

Holy cow. What a blast.

Liz
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« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2010, 09:01:52 PM »

I think JP is giving you good advice. One that size will have a( bunch) of foragers returning later in the evening. If you can leave the hive you will gain many. GOOD LUCK!!
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vmmartin
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« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2010, 09:14:10 PM »

In my day job, I rent construction equipment. We have units that are towable man lifts. They can be pulled behind a 1/2 ton pick up and reach up anywhere from 34-50 feet. You could maybe use it to hang the box from the tree and return the next day to remove it. http://www.genielift.net/tmz-series/index.asp
Awesome pics by the way.
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L Daxon
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« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2010, 09:35:21 PM »

I'd make sure you watch as many of JP's videos as possible before you tackle the actual cut out.  JP has the technique down pat and you will learn a lot.  We are lucky he posts them here for all of us to learn from.
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linda d
JP
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« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2010, 09:44:38 PM »

JP you say do it early evening ??
I was thinking Early a M then Leave the scaffold all day with Hive on top

 I am so new to this you say orient them self's

YOU mean this so they won't go out the next morning and end up returning to the tree
opposed to the New Hive Local 100 yards away?

 The Guy who has the land may hire someone to stay out there if I tell him its needed
He's all about saving them

Morning would be great but you mentioned this was a bad area.

If you have the time to stay all day remove them in the morning, make a picnic, twiddle your thumbs and then seal them at night and take them with you.

If its not as bad an area as you say, remove them in the morning, set them up, leave and go do something else and then come back and seal them at dark.

If you catch the queen cage her in the set up. If not she'll probably go in the new set up on her own with the rest of the bees.

Yes, they will orient all on their own.


...JP
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Tommyt
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« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2010, 10:03:31 PM »

In my day job, I rent construction equipment. We have units that are towable man lifts. They can be pulled behind a 1/2 ton pick up and reach up anywhere from 34-50 feet. You could maybe use it to hang the box from the tree and return the next day to remove it. http://www.genielift.net/tmz-series/index.asp
Awesome pics by the way.


  Got a Buddy that works Local cable Co. been with them 30 yrs. and I think he can slip it over ?
I'm calling him in the Morning
The Problem about equipment, is a Power line Right of way and a Train Track, runs aside this alley,
all kinds walking,sleeping,smoking who knows what? The Tree was found when his Guys, Cut the pepper trees back
and Bush Hogged a old over Grown road
  I think the only Safe way would be if I could suspend it, so none of the Crack heads or transit can get to it.
 I'm so over whelmed over Bees, its got my mind spinning, 2 months ago I made a KTBH with a window for my Granddaughter
and starting hitting the net about Bees
I haven't got Bee one in the KTBH rolleyes BUT I do have, a 3 frame Nuc and one full 10 frame med box Full of Bees 100 plus hours on the PC  grin and Now This  shocked
I am loving everything about Bee's

Tom



Thanks JP I was writing the above when you Posted

ldaxon I have watched Repeatedly  grin
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