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Author Topic: Lumber has been purchased  (Read 2604 times)
AliciaH
Field Bee
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Posts: 762


Location: Enumclaw Plateau, WA


« Reply #20 on: October 18, 2010, 01:27:07 PM »

My brood boxes are all deeps.  They do get heavy and I have a hard time inspecting later in summer.  I get around this by having a spare deep with me in the apiary.  If I need to separate my boxes, I move some of the frames into the spare to lighten the box.  Takes a bit more time, but helpful.  And it's never a bad idea to have a spare around, for whatever reason!

As for foundation, I'm with you, so many choices!  Personally, I use Duragilt.  Straight forward, not a lot of fuss, easy to replace when needed.  When I have a dedicated work space that does not involve the kitchen table or sharing space with garden tools, I'd like to try wiring wax foundation.  But that's more because I'd like to know how to do it than because I might use it permanently.  For every beek, there's a way..... Smiley

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tecumseh
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Location: College Station, Tx


« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2010, 06:58:13 AM »

mjd writes:
If I am reading right the first year is not really a honey harvest year?

tecumsh:
I have a nuc customer in Houston that  inform me that he has taken just a bit of honey in year one.  I suspect at least one other customer could have taken considerable more.  I usually suggest they take a taste as a reward for their effort, but don't take too much in year one. 
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I am 'the panther that passes in the night'... tecumseh.
mjdtexan
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Location: Houston(ish) Texas

BBQ MASTER


« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2010, 07:44:47 AM »

I didnt realize you sold nucs. Is that customer going to drive back out for more bees this spring? Maybe I could send money and work something out with him to halve his fuel cost or something? Maybe ride with him, or not. I am assuming you like to be prepaid.
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Wine Maker
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Interested in Hot Peppers
Texas Apiary Inspection Service
caticind
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Location: Carrboro, North Carolina

Nothing sweeter...


« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2010, 09:19:50 AM »

Manfre,

I'm doing much the same in Chapel Hill/Carrboro.  I build long hives that take deep foundationless Lang frames (32) and Lang migratory tops (3).  Turns out using deeps for honey and brood is no problem when you only have to pick up one at a time.  grin  Getting the no-lifting benefits of a TBH plus the bee space maintenance of a Lang.  Plus I've been stunned at how easy inspection is, not having to disturb any but the frames I want to inspect.  I wouldn't use them for a mobile operation though - unwieldy to move when full and they have a big footprint.  This is the first year with them, so we'll see how well they overwinter and expand in the spring.

If you'd like to swap more details, PM me.
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The bees would be no help; they would tumble over each other like golden babies and thrum wordlessly on the subjects of queens and sex and pollen-gluey feet. -Palimpsest
mjdtexan
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Location: Houston(ish) Texas

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« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2010, 09:23:28 AM »

Manfre,

I'm doing much the same in Chapel Hill/Carrboro.  I build long hives that take deep foundationless Lang frames (32) and Lang migratory tops (3).  Turns out using deeps for honey and brood is no problem when you only have to pick up one at a time.  grin  Getting the no-lifting benefits of a TBH plus the bee space maintenance of a Lang.  Plus I've been stunned at how easy inspection is, not having to disturb any but the frames I want to inspect.  I wouldn't use them for a mobile operation though - unwieldy to move when full and they have a big footprint.  This is the first year with them, so we'll see how well they overwinter and expand in the spring.

If you'd like to swap more details, PM me.
It would be cool to see a picture of that hive.  afro
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Wine Maker
Gardener
BBQ Competition Enthusiast
Interested in Hot Peppers
Texas Apiary Inspection Service
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