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Author Topic: Bluberry Flavored Honey  (Read 1391 times)
Creamhorses
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« on: October 07, 2010, 05:26:35 PM »

Hello Beeks

Does anyone have a receipie for blueberry flavored honey....needs to be jarred- unrefridgerated.

Thank you so kindlly,

Dave, VT
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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: October 07, 2010, 06:40:45 PM »

So are you looking for blueberry honey jam,   blueberry honey butter, or blueberry honey sauce?
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hardwood
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« Reply #2 on: October 07, 2010, 07:41:41 PM »

I'd like to hear a recipe for this too! I hadn't realized there even is such a thing 'til now. I know the fresh-picked blueberries swimmin' in honey is a treat!

Scott
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AllenF
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2010, 09:08:17 PM »

My mother back in the day would make blueberry syrup for pancakes.    She cooked down the blueberries (like making jelly) and then mixed with karo syrup.   But I guess you would rather have honey in there rather than karo syrup.

http://www.food.com/recipe/blueberry-honey-125292

http://blue.food.com/recipe/blueberry-honey-jam-179295

http://www.grouprecipes.com/46616/exquisite-blueberry-honey-butter.html

 grin
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Creamhorses
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« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2010, 01:10:14 AM »

I saw a display in a gift shop that had several varieties of flavered honey......not jam, not butter.
Thank you for your replies.
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NWIN Beekeeper
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« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2010, 01:52:44 AM »

My question would be did you see "Blueberry Flavored Honey" or "Blueberry Bloom Honey" ?
The first would be a flavor agent added, the second would be just honey from blueberry nectar sources - both very different.
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AllenF
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2010, 02:03:07 AM »

I have a bunch of honey stix that are flavored.   I don't know what they use to flavor them. 
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Buz Green
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« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2010, 08:18:05 AM »

I remember reading somewhere about fruit flavored honey and i think the basic idea was to use dried fruit.
Did you try searching it?
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Hethen57
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« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2010, 12:49:11 PM »

I talked to a guy selling Huckleberry Honey at the local farmer's market and he said he just purees a small amount of fresh berries and warms the honey and mixes it in.  I was amazed there there was very little skin and seed residue, but it did have a purplish tint.  He said that since berrys have a high moisture content, many people add too much and it spoils the honey, so you can only add a little so that the moisture content stays low.  The flavor was great.  I might try to puree and cook the berries before adding.  He was reluctant to give his secret, but that was the general idea.
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Tommyt
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« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2010, 01:34:07 PM »

With Fruit added will the Honey be able to sour or maybe Build alcohol content with age

Tommyt
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L Daxon
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« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2010, 04:17:40 PM »

Chapter 5 (page 120) of The Backyard Beekeeper's Honey Handbook talks about making "infused honey" by using mesh bags (reusable tea bags? or small bags made from nylon mesh purchased from a fabric store) and filling them with the flavor you want to infuse into the honey (in her illustration various herbs or flower blossoms were used).

You fill the mesh bags with what ever flavor you are after then place each bag in a jar of honey, then set the honey on a sunny windowsill for 1-2 weeks.    Or, if you are in a hurry, you can do the same tea bag thing, then heat the honey (about a pints worth) in a double boiler to 180 degrees for 10-12 minutes.  Of course you pull the bags whenever you get the flavor the strength you want.

If you are going to flavor or "infuse" honey you need to use a light variety.  The heavier, darker varieties might make it harder to detect the "infused" scent/flavor.

The book showed a sample of blueberry flavored honey but never gave a recipe for it.
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linda d
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« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2010, 06:00:27 PM »

Sounds just like making Sun Tea
and Making me Hungry

Chapter 5 (page 120) of The Backyard Beekeeper's Honey Handbook talks about making "infused honey" by using mesh bags (reusable tea bags? or small bags made from nylon mesh purchased from a fabric store) and filling them with the flavor you want to infuse into the honey (in her illustration various herbs or flower blossoms were used).

You fill the mesh bags with what ever flavor you are after then place each bag in a jar of honey, then set the honey on a sunny windowsill for 1-2 weeks.    Or, if you are in a hurry, you can do the same tea bag thing, then heat the honey (about a pints worth) in a double boiler to 180 degrees for 10-12 minutes.  Of course you pull the bags whenever you get the flavor the strength you want.

If you are going to flavor or "infuse" honey you need to use a light variety.  The heavier, darker varieties might make it harder to detect the "infused" scent/flavor.

The book showed a sample of blueberry flavored honey but never gave a recipe for it.
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"Not everything found on the internet is accurate"
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