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Author Topic: Hive Stand  (Read 549 times)

Offline DDJ324

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Hive Stand
« on: March 23, 2015, 02:22:58 PM »
This is my second post (first is in Say hello).  I have not raised or handled bees before and I have a few weeks until the first county beekeepers club meeting.

My hive parts are due on Saturday.  I spent time this weekend working on the Area where my hive will be located.  Our plan is to clear the area around the hive put down plastic and then Mulch over it.  This is no problem and other than the mulch it is done.  I have dry stacked concrete blocks 3 courses high I have a slight lean (1/4 bubble or less) to the front Right of the hive  Thinking it will allow drainage should anything leak.  I have also created my "block wall" in more of a C shape so that there would be some air flow up from through the screen bottom board.  I plan on placing a bail of straw at this opening for winter to block wind but still provide breathing room.  I faced this opening to the south where the shed 10 to 15 feet away should block some of the wind.  I have a chain link fence on 2 sides of the hive that I plan on turning into a wind break for winter, likely with more bales of Straw.

Have I made any huge mistakes that will kill everthing or should that work.

Offline cao

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2015, 09:35:01 PM »
It seems that you got everything covered.  The only thing that would worry me is that straw will have a tendency to attract mice.  That could be a problem if they find their way into the hive during the winter.  I would suggest a piece of foam instead.  Hopefully you will get some other opinions.  I would ask that you put in your location in your profile, it would help in answering any of your questions. 


Offline DDJ324

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2015, 02:11:46 PM »
Got my hive bodies on Saturday.  Decided to not paint but burn and poly.  It fit on the hive stand as I expected.  Now I just have to assemble the frames.

Attached is a first pass picture the wife decided that I should burn more.
Opps:
Here are some larger/more pictures.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimisod/


Offline mikecva

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2015, 12:38:42 PM »
That looks high ~24" I hope you are tall enough to remove your supers if you use 3. Mine are 3 medimums over a 8 & 12" stand but then I am not a spring chicken and I am working with a week back.  -Mike
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Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
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Offline Michael Bush

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2015, 03:35:44 PM »
IMO anything over 3 1/2" is too tall...
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline DDJ324

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2015, 01:58:29 PM »
At 6'1" the top of the hive is likely where I would stop.  I am thinking I will pull a course of block out for next year.  We already have a skunk problem and I understand that making them stand on their back legs exposes their soft underbelly to the defenders and the stings hurt in the reproductive areas (that would drive me off).  Thanks for the comments and I will review/rethink before I install bees next weekend.


Offline mikecva

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2015, 02:45:13 PM »
As for skunks, I put carpet strips on the bottom of the sloped landing area. I also painted them pink to remind me not to touch there. :cry:   -Mike
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Listen to others but make your own decisions. That way you own the results.
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Offline craneman54

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #7 on: April 07, 2015, 09:46:35 AM »
Quote
I have dry stacked concrete blocks 3 courses high I have a slight lean (1/4 bubble or less) to the front Right of the hive  Thinking it will allow drainage should anything leak.

I may be wrong but I take this to mean you have the hives leaning forward(which is good) ,but also having a lean to the right side(Not so good). Any lean to the side will likely cause crooked comb and probably cross combing.
Retired crane operator
I love woodturning

Offline MT Bee Girl

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #8 on: April 22, 2015, 02:52:13 PM »
The only thing that would worry me is that straw will have a tendency to attract mice.  That could be a problem if they find their way into the hive during the winter.  I would suggest a piece of foam instead. 

I didn't think of that. I was planning on putting a sort of three sided straw wall around my hive to protect them from the wind. It gets pretty crazy. We grequently have 20 mph gusts. Foam would definitely not work here. lol What else could I use then? That won't cost me an arm and a leg? I'm just worried they'll sruggle in the wind plus it makes it so much colder in the winter...

Sorry ddj, don't mean to steal your topic. It seems we're both newbees. :)

Offline Colobee

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #9 on: April 22, 2015, 11:10:05 PM »
Straw attracts mice, mice attract cats. Our neighborhood cat is doing a fine job.  :shocked:

I have several bales of straw for an archery backstop. When they get really old, they get tilled into the garden. There's hardly ever been a year when I didn't have this "mouse attractant".

A small lower winter entrance or mouse guard will usually do the job. I pity the mouse that tries to move in from spring to fall. 'Never had a mouse in a live hive, but they sure have  made some messes in old supers stored outside.
The bees usually fix my mistakes

Offline MT Bee Girl

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Re: Hive Stand
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2015, 08:44:04 AM »
Straw attracts mice, mice attract cats. Our neighborhood cat is doing a fine job.  :shocked:

I have several bales of straw for an archery backstop. When they get really old, they get tilled into the garden. There's hardly ever been a year when I didn't have this "mouse attractant".

A small lower winter entrance or mouse guard will usually do the job. I pity the mouse that tries to move in from spring to fall. 'Never had a mouse in a live hive, but they sure have  made some messes in old supers stored outside.

Thank you. Makes sense.