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Poll
Question: What the way to go?
Lek - 1 (50%)
Lek - 1 (50%)
Total Voters: 2


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Author Topic: Waxing  (Read 1802 times)
Lek
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Location: Mackay District,Queensland, Australia


« on: September 29, 2010, 02:45:24 AM »

Came across a heap of paraffin wax candles the other day while doing a clean out, I thought these be just the thing to melt down and dip the hive timber into.  What’s the way to go doing this,  is the timber fully dipped into the melted wax, and how long would I leave them there, or is the wax brushed on?

Lek.

 
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Cullz
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« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2010, 03:01:48 AM »

I think the timber is immersed in the melted wax for quite a while. The moisture is heated out of the wood and then the wood absorbs the wax. Some people paint a few coats of paint on after taking it out of the wax, while it's still hot. The wood absorbs the paint too.

As you can imagine, it's very dangerous. The temperature has to be closely controlled; too cold it wont work well, too hot it will combust.

Here's an excellent PDF about Hot Wax Dipping
..or view it online
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philinacoma
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« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2010, 05:06:28 AM »

I thought hot wax dipping was done with bees wax not paraffin?
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Cullz
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« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2010, 05:08:39 AM »

As far as I know, lots of commercial beekeepers sell the beeswax and buy paraffin because it's cheaper. Beeswax should work fine too.
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danno
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« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2010, 08:15:17 AM »

It has to be dipped long enough so the wood and wax are the same temp.  This way excess will run off and you will end up with a thin coat. 
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Scadsobees
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Best use of smileys in a post award.


« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2010, 08:55:55 AM »

You would need a huge heap of candles... rolleyes  it might work a little if you were to heat up the boxes and then paint some wet wax on, although you would get more protection from a coat or two of latex paint without as much work.

Usually they add some tree resin to that too for added protection.
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Rick
Tommyt
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« Reply #6 on: October 08, 2010, 02:08:21 PM »

Here is one of a guy in the US cooking hives
Part 1 & 2
http://www.youtube.com/user/mrneede#p/a/u/2/MNdRRNfbN7o


http://www.youtube.com/user/mrneede#p/u/3/D7N14X01xw8
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"Not everything found on the internet is accurate"
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Hikerd
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« Reply #7 on: June 30, 2011, 06:48:32 PM »

I think the timber is immersed in the melted wax for quite a while. The moisture is heated out of the wood and then the wood absorbs the wax. Some people paint a few coats of paint on after taking it out of the wax, while it's still hot. The wood absorbs the paint too.

As you can imagine, it's very dangerous. The temperature has to be closely controlled; too cold it wont work well, too hot it will combust.




When others post about "rosin"... what is there another term or definition used? I've seen posting talking about a "1.5lbs of gum rosin to 11 lbs of paraffin" mixture for the hot dip.

Also what are some of the other trade names for paraffin wax/ Microcrystaline Wax / rosin / gum rosin?

Could someone help me find suppliers of paraffin wax/ Microcrystaline Wax in Utah?

thanks,
H

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Grieth
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« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2011, 05:57:12 AM »

At a recent field day at a major commercial operator they offered dipping in microcrystalline wax.  It is different to paraffin, see en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcrystalline_wax

Don't know much else, but wish I could find someone near me who dips in bees wax and rosin as it seems more natural.
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"The time has come," the walrus said, "to talk of many things:
Of shoes and ships - and sealing wax - of cabbages and kings”
Lewis Carroll
Mardak
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« Reply #9 on: July 05, 2011, 01:33:27 AM »

Rob MacDonald out of Castlemaine will cook your hive ware for about $3 each. Very cheap for what you get, no mess, no prep, just bring paint coat them with this.
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Grieth
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« Reply #10 on: July 05, 2011, 07:22:46 AM »

Do you just Tele to get a time or does he just do it on the field days?
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"The time has come," the walrus said, "to talk of many things:
Of shoes and ships - and sealing wax - of cabbages and kings”
Lewis Carroll
Mardak
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« Reply #11 on: July 21, 2011, 03:26:14 AM »

Give him a tingle. A great guy to yarn with about everything and anything to do with bees. The whole family are really nice to meet and chat with. The family do regular repairs as they are a very large operation. When they doing their woodware they will probably invite you up. The process including painting takes a few minutes per piece. They are very skilled and helplful in showing you everything about it. The costs of set up of the wax frier are very high for a little operator or hobby keeper. It is dangerous in terms of combustion and burning yourself as the wax is virtually at its boiling point when you dip them. Your woodware should vey dry as the moisture makes an impressive bubble up if not dry. I leant this a few years ago when we did some cooking ourselves. Needs to be done  in a very well ventilated area as the fumes are very "toxic" if you inhale them.
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gregted
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I used to be indicisive, but I'm not so sure now..


« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2011, 06:06:01 PM »

Not a bad set of videos..

Thinking of setting up this myself. Does anyone here is Oz have any experience with this?

Looks pretty simple but I would like to use beeswax instead of paraffin.

What would be the reason for paraffin wax?

The cooker looks fairly thick. I am thinking 3 to 6 mm plate and a barbecue burner underneath.

I think the setup wold be fairly inexpensive if I can use beeswax.

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Michael Bush
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« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2011, 12:02:28 AM »

http://www.bushfarms.com/beesdipping.htm

I dip for ten minutes at between 230º and 250º F (110º and 121º C).
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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