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Offline drone1952

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differences
« on: August 02, 2010, 07:10:50 AM »
There is a difference between queens obtained by grafting and obtained by using kits (jenter, Nicot) Why are most appreciated by those  obteained grafting.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 09:56:50 AM by drone1952 »

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: differences
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2010, 06:18:22 AM »
There is no difference that I can see.  I've done a lot of both.
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen

Offline tecumseh

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Re: differences
« Reply #2 on: August 29, 2010, 08:18:35 PM »
Jay Smith (who's basic idea is being reproduced by the Jenter and Nicot apparatus) would say YES there most definitely is...
I am 'the panther that passes in the night'... tecumseh.

Offline Michael Bush

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Re: differences
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2010, 12:04:20 PM »
http://bushfarms.com/beesbetterqueens.htm#The%20Grafting%20Method

"The Grafting Method

"The object of Better Queens is to be helpful to all who rear queens and not to criticize those who use the grafting system. After all, I am criticizing the method I taught in Queen Rearing Simplified, so it is perfectly legitimate to criticize oneself! Many who now are using the grafting system and who want to rear better queens will want the two systems compared. As most beekeepers know, by the grafting method we mean the method in which the larva from a worker cell is transferred to an artificial queen cell. We used that system for 33 years. Not one of those years did we get the fine large cells which are necessary to produce full developed queens throughout the whole season. We found that when there was a light honey flow with plenty of pollen coming in, and if we kept the cell builders up to great strength, we could get a very high percentage of good queens. Even at its best we had to cull cells and virgins and frequently to discard laying queens that were not fully developed. Even then a few inferior queens would get by us which we had to replace. This never happens with our present system. We never have thrown away a cell for being too small, for all are alike. With the present system we have yet to see an undersized virgin. When using the grafting system, when there was no flow, it was well-nigh impossible to get good cells even though we fed sugar by the ton. Not one of those 33 years passed in which I did not long for a system with which I could produce those fine large cells which I had observed in colonies preparing to swarm, a system by which I could produce cells in quantities throughout the entire season. "--Jay Smith, Better Queens
Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm en espanol: bushfarms.com/es_bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen