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Author Topic: The gift of bees,,,  (Read 3024 times)
VolunteerK9
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« on: July 31, 2010, 09:11:41 PM »

I usually watch tv with my laptop in front of me to pass the time between commercials. I've heard of people sponsoring livestock for people in 3rd world countries before but not this.  I thought it was pretty cool.

http://www.heifer.org/site/c.edJRKQNiFiG/b.2668675/
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CAHighwind
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« Reply #1 on: July 31, 2010, 10:11:01 PM »

That is really cool, the kind of charity that can really do some good.
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AllenF
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« Reply #2 on: July 31, 2010, 11:29:30 PM »

I had not see the gift of bees yet either,   that's cool.
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« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2010, 12:07:05 PM »

This is a great organization.  My husband and I have donated to this cause a few times, it's a good way to help others become as self sufficient as they can.  And the gift of bees lets them enjoy the bees as much as we do.
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« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2010, 12:23:03 PM »

Selfishly speaking, I would like to get ahold of some $30 packages though Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: August 01, 2010, 01:57:33 PM »

I was just thinking the same thing, 30. bucks for bees I would have more than the one hive I have now
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AllenF
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« Reply #6 on: August 01, 2010, 02:01:15 PM »

So you would really pay $30 for AHB bees from South America?
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« Reply #7 on: August 01, 2010, 02:11:21 PM »

I have gotten their catalog over the years, but I don't remember ever seeing the gift of bees. Pretty neat and something I can get into for sure.
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« Reply #8 on: August 01, 2010, 02:33:15 PM »

well are they good honey producers?
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sarafina
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« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2010, 04:56:02 PM »

well are they good honey producers?

absolutely.  but stealing it from them is a b**ch!   evil 
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« Reply #10 on: August 01, 2010, 05:10:19 PM »

yes that does pose a bit of a problem
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G3farms
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« Reply #11 on: August 01, 2010, 05:46:01 PM »

If you look closer at the pic I would say they are not AHB, many onlookers and the one beek does not have any protection on.

The $30 gets them not only a package of bees but the whole hive also.

Looking at their website seems like their pricing is a little out of skew. Some of the livestock pricing is very high $20 for a bunny, $120 for a piglet or kid. They are even helping out families in the USA. With all of their ranches and farms located in the US you would think the live stock pricing would be very cheap. I wonder where they obtain their package bees and wooden wares.

This sounds like a great idea, but could not find how much actually is given out  (what percentage of the donations) and what are the annual takes of the board of directors. I am sorry but just have seen too many "non profit" organizations that are only for the few fat cats at the top. I know of one here locally that is a scam.

This could be a great organization and I am not downing it since I really do not know anything about it, just sound too good to be true.
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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
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« Reply #12 on: August 01, 2010, 08:31:30 PM »

If you are really intent on helping someone from another country who is poor, do it directly, it has been my experience that these organizations only have a small percentage left that actually gets where you want it to. Contact a faith organization and get in touch with an actual family. This sent my antenna buzzing when I read the small print at the bottom of the home page. Turned me off right there.
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« Reply #13 on: August 01, 2010, 09:05:35 PM »

I don't think you can get gentle bees in Uganda or El Salvador.   El Salvador has AHB and Uganda has the mother stock.  I would call these cheap bees.

And on livestock prices, they change from region to region.   They may have better deals with breeders in other parts of the world on certain animals. 
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Jim 134
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« Reply #14 on: August 02, 2010, 09:23:20 AM »

The $30 gets them not only a package of bees but the whole hive also.



   huh huh $30 is this a hive of bees or is this a share of a hive  huh huh



    BEE HAPPY Jim 134  Smiley
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G3farms
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« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2010, 10:06:32 AM »

right from their web page...............


Although most Heifer partners keep bees as a supplement to family income, beekeeping can be a family's livelihood. Your gift can help Heifer provide a family with a package of bees, the box and hive, plus training in beekeeping - and this unique gift will be passed on to another family in need.


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see my swarms and cut outs at https://www.youtube.com/user/soapy22bullet?feature=mhee

those hot bees will have you steppin and a fetchin like your heads on fire and your @ss is a catchin!!!

Bees will be bees and do as they please!
Livefreeordie
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« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2010, 02:14:28 PM »

Also from their web site.....





Gifts made through this catalog represent a gift to the entire mission. To help the most number of families move toward self-reliance, Heifer does not use its limited resources to track gift animals from donation to distribution. We use your gifts where they can do the most good by pooling them with the gifts of others to help transform entire communities. And, because you are helping Heifer fight hunger and poverty, your gift is tax deductible.


No Thanks.
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slacker361
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« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2010, 02:46:01 PM »

one thing that college logic taught me, is that if you are good, you can word things in a way that you can get away with just about anything it looks like they also learned this lesson
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rgy
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« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2010, 03:43:21 PM »

charity navigator says 67% of funds go tot he programs and 33% for administration/fundraising.  that's close enough to united way that i will stay far far away.
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annette
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« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2010, 03:50:15 PM »

Also from their web site.....





Gifts made through this catalog represent a gift to the entire mission. To help the most number of families move toward self-reliance, Heifer does not use its limited resources to track gift animals from donation to distribution. We use your gifts where they can do the most good by pooling them with the gifts of others to help transform entire communities. And, because you are helping Heifer fight hunger and poverty, your gift is tax deductible.


No Thanks.

Well that's not good! I want to give a gift of bees, not something else.
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diggity
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« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2010, 04:17:30 PM »

Don't be dissuaded so easily - Heifer is a great organization. 

They have a campus (learning center, business office, and functioning farm) in Rutland, MA, which is just one town away from me.  I've been there many times.  The folks who run it are great people, they attract lots of young volunteers, and maintain excellent missionary programs in numerous developing countries.  They also give back to the local community, with events at the farm, summer camps, and educational programs at local schools and churches - yes, of course they're always looking for donations at these functions (as they should), but it's a happy quid pro quo.  They bring livestock in to our church for the living Pageant at Christmas time - it's so funny to see a donkey walking up to the altar!  smiley

We donate every year.  We usually donate in other people's names, as Christmas gifts, etc.  After all, what kind of holiday gift do you get Dear Aunt Tillie, or the neighbors you hardly ever see?  You can buy a bee hive, or some baby chicks, or a share of a cow or something in their name - Heifer gives you a card explaining what the gift is.  Aunt Tillie will love it,  you'll feel good about it, and the money will go to good use.

As for whether your money goes to individual gifts or the general fund, they are very up front about this.  I think it's just impractical to manage every single bunny, chicken, or bee.
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #21 on: August 02, 2010, 05:15:18 PM »

Yes, but I think it's a bit disingenuous to tell someone they can  give this specific item and later on tell them
"Well, actually you gave x amount of dollars that we'll use how we think is best."

If they are 'selling' something specific, then people should expect that is what they are getting (or giving in this case.)

maybe it's just me though.

Big Bear
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Jim 134
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« Reply #22 on: August 02, 2010, 07:26:40 PM »

The $30 gets them not only a package of bees but the whole hive also.



   huh huh $30 is this a hive of bees or is this a share of a hive  huh huh



    BEE HAPPY Jim 134  Smiley

Dear Jim,
 
Thank you for your email to Heifer International.
 
In regards to your enquiry, $30 is the cost of a full hive of honeybees.  Honeybees are of great benefit to Heifer International project partners.  Honoring a friend or family member with honeybees is a gift that shows you cherish both people and the environment. The way bees work together is a lesson for us all. They produce food, care for the young, recycle waste and create an effective, efficient community. They pollinate fruits, flowers and vegetables in the process--a benefit for us. a package of Heifer bees and a hive gives families better crops, candle wax, pollen for medicine and honey to eat and sell.
 
If you would like to donate a hive of honeybees you may do so either online, by contacting us at 1 888 548 6437 Heifer International


Attn: Donor Services
PO Box 8058
Little Rock AR 72203
 
I hope this helps, and please do not hesitate to contact us if we can be of further assistance.
 
Kind regards,
 
Amy Davis
Donor Services Representative
Heifer International




 BEE HAPPY Jim 134 Smiley
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"Tell me and I'll forget,show me and I may  remember,involve me and I'll understand"
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"The farmer is the only man in our economy who buys everything at retail, sells everything at wholesale, and pays the freight both ways."
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Livefreeordie
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« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2010, 07:35:18 PM »

Looks like there is a big discrepancy between what is written and what people say. THAT should send up red flags. When I donate to someone, it isn't about ME feeling good about it, it is to help the recipient. I will help someone right here in my own community and then I KNOW what my efforts are going for. Anyone wants to support this organization, it is their business, it isn't for me. I was born at night, but it wasn't last night.
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luvin honey
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« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2010, 09:04:09 PM »

charity navigator says 67% of funds go tot he programs and 33% for administration/fundraising.  that's close enough to united way that i will stay far far away.
I adored Heifer International until I found that one, too. Their mission is so awesome, and so self sustaining in the way they set it up, but so much going to administration!
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The pedigree of honey
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2010, 10:21:34 PM »

In all fairness, offices don't pay for themselves.  Not everyone in an active non profit group is a volunteer, to keep things going, there will be some people who need to pay their bills while doing the full time work.  Also, there are expenses to having an office in terms of rent, utilities, desks, printers, phones, they don't get those things for free just because they are a non profit group.

Not only are those things not free, they're not exactly cheap either.

Administrative costs are part of any operation, for profit or otherwise.

 I just think there should be more openness in the fund raising efforts to specify what you are contributing to and how it will will be used.

 I have donated to many non profits 'general funds' because  I believe in the work they do and know that those people would like to make a living doing something they love to do.  No one is asking to get rich in these types of organizations, but paying the rent and feeding ones kids might be helpful.

But again, if you are asking for operational funds, make it clear.  if you are seeking funds to go toward the end beneficiary, specify that as well.

but, maybe that's just me who sees it that way.

Big Bear
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luvin honey
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« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2010, 11:46:10 PM »

I get it that businesses don't run themselves, or strictly on volunteer time. But some fundraising organizations manage to spend far less on administrative costs. Could just be that their other costs are minimal, and so administrative costs look imbalanced compared to the rest...

I will say, though, that I get glossy, color, large booklets from them all the time! I want to tell them to stop spending so much money on these materials, as they are also sending me the same info in e-mail format! Save costs and materials and just e-mail the pledge requests!
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The pedigree of honey
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A clover, any time, to him
Is aristocracy.
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #27 on: August 03, 2010, 07:23:43 AM »

Oh, I agree with you.  No one likes to see "wasteful" spending, especially from a non-profit.

However, it's a fine line on the use of 'fancy' props like the slick glossy catalogs, or more plain fare because there are so many people out there like you and I who don't need to be 'sold' to in order to get our attention, "we just want the facts ma'am", so to speak. 

On the other hand, there are lots of people out there with the attitude that if you want to be 'professional'  you have to look it.

Those folks are the ones who won't give the time of day to a plain brown wrapper because it's not exciting enough or not entertaining enough or whatever they expect.

Trying to get a variety of people's attention and interest in the non-profit arena is a tough market because you know you can't please everyone, yet that's exactly what they want you to do.

For me, my attention goes to those who seem most practical, more 'hand up" instead of 'hand out' and more 'creative' with their attention getting measures instead of spending the extra buck or ten for the 'fancy' attention getters.

 I can't say that  I have really thought about this particular group as it is the first time I have ever heard of them, in this thread.

Big Bear
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diggity
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« Reply #28 on: August 03, 2010, 09:16:45 AM »

My final comment, I just hate to see people pass judgement so quickly on such a fine charity.  Donate to Heifer or donate elsewhere - it's really none of my business - but I can assure you they are fine people doing good work in the world.  I suspect their administrative costs are high in part because of the working farms they run.  Yes, visitors to the farm have the opportunity to make a donation, but nobody pesters you about it, and most people I see leave without donating, so I suspect the farms are run at a loss.  At the same time, those visitors leave having learned something about the plight of 3rd world nations, famine, political instability, and self-sustaining agriculture.  They also learn about sustainable food production here at home too.  Once we were there when a bus full of young kids from an inner city (I think it was Boston - could have been Providence, don't remember exactly) showed up.  You could see by the expressions of wonder on their faces that this was the first experience many of them had on a farm, and that they were learning a lot about where food really comes from.

As for whether your dollars actually go to buy an actual mooing cow, or into a pool which then gets split up to buy lots of cows, bees, rabbits, chickens, etc, I guess you could call that gimmicky if you want to, but my experience has been that they are very up-front about it.  They probably do it because of the charity-as-a-gift aspect.  It just sounds a lot nicer to tell Aunt Tillie that you gave a sheep in her name, than to tell her that you contributed on her behalf into a general fund.   All charities compete for a limited supply of donor cash, and this is Heifer's niche.

Anyway, when it comes to charities, let your dollars follow your heart.  Cheers and God bless.  smiley
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slacker361
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« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2010, 07:00:43 PM »

i wonder if I could donate a hive of bees to my neighbor,   ummmm yeah ,my neighbor
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luvin honey
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« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2010, 09:56:44 PM »

Those folks are the ones who won't give the time of day to a plain brown wrapper because it's not exciting enough or not entertaining enough or whatever they expect.

Trying to get a variety of people's attention and interest in the non-profit arena is a tough market because you know you can't please everyone, yet that's exactly what they want you to do.
Very true, and a great point.

Quote
My final comment, I just hate to see people pass judgement so quickly on such a fine charity.  Donate to Heifer or donate elsewhere - it's really none of my business - but I can assure you they are fine people doing good work in the world.  I suspect their administrative costs are high in part because of the working farms they run.  Yes, visitors to the farm have the opportunity to make a donation, but nobody pesters you about it, and most people I see leave without donating, so I suspect the farms are run at a loss.  At the same time, those visitors leave having learned something about the plight of 3rd world nations, famine, political instability, and self-sustaining agriculture.  They also learn about sustainable food production here at home too.  Once we were there when a bus full of young kids from an inner city (I think it was Boston - could have been Providence, don't remember exactly) showed up.  You could see by the expressions of wonder on their faces that this was the first experience many of them had on a farm, and that they were learning a lot about where food really comes from.
Ok, I will give them another chance. I have never had such a great feeling as when donating to them--I'd say their beautiful glossy literature probably did its trick on me Smiley
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The pedigree of honey
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Livefreeordie
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« Reply #31 on: August 04, 2010, 10:00:30 PM »

i wonder if I could donate a hive of bees to my neighbor,   ummmm yeah ,my neighbor

I think there are plenty of under privileged people right here in our own country, and probably in your community. How about using the same resources to take a kid under your wing and get them involved? I guess I would rather see first hand how my efforts do, rather than assume.
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« Reply #32 on: August 04, 2010, 10:03:04 PM »

http://www.charitynavigator.org/
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #33 on: August 04, 2010, 11:22:41 PM »

Free Bees Network

Take a look at this page for the Free Bees Network and please join us if you are interested in getting more bees out in the world and more beekeepers to help each other.

This is a new project and we think it is worthwhile to help one another get going and stay going.

Big Bear
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