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Author Topic: small hive beetles and advice  (Read 15409 times)
L Daxon
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« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2010, 11:24:48 PM »

Is it worth keeping a beetle trap on in the winter.  Are those little bugs active then or do they hibernate during the winter months?  Go underground?  Surely they don't have free reign of the hive while the bees are clustered up tight.
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tecumseh
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« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2010, 07:21:34 AM »

when the weather cools they move even slower than the honeybees.  they ain't so much fun to squash then since they are such an easy target.

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Cullz
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« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2010, 07:40:28 AM »

Do they shut down breeding over the cooler months, and do they do this even in warmer areas?
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AllenF
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« Reply #23 on: October 13, 2010, 10:01:07 AM »

SHB will be in the winter cluster with the bees.   If you ever clean out a hive that froze over the winter, you will be amazed where you find them. 
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Anybrew
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« Reply #24 on: October 16, 2010, 01:30:02 AM »

Hi Guys, I am new to this site and read with interest that some of you use self contained cochroach traps as one way of controlling SHB or did I read this wrong. I think "Mason" has used them it the past is that right and can they be used to control a nasty invasion whilst I wait for my Beetle Jails to arrive from the good ol USA.

Cheers
Steve
Australia
« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 04:56:20 PM by Richmond » Logged
AllenF
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« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2010, 09:09:40 AM »

BEEKEEPING,Bees,SMALL HIVE BEETLES,Beetle trap filling,install Beekeepers Honeybees Beehives Georgia


Here is what I think you are looking for.   And here is another beetle trap some are using.

Making Small Hive BeetleTraps with the "FatBeeMan"


Note, these poisons are not approved inside the hive in the US.  (disclaimer added)
« Last Edit: October 16, 2010, 03:46:59 PM by AllenF » Logged
AllenF
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« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2010, 03:44:58 PM »

Check out the oil trays for SHB.   Here is a west trap with oil.
hive beetle infestation

Here is another oil trap with oil.

Freeman Beetle Trap Design


I have them both but use the freeman trap the most because you can just buy the trays and use your SBB and a solid bottom.  (cheaper)
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Anybrew
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« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2010, 05:25:38 PM »

Hi AllenF,
Good info mate, I really like that small trap in the first clip that the guy slides into the entrance where do you get those from??? I would love to purchase some and what bait does he put in them??

Cheers
Steve
Ausralia
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KD4MOJ
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« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2010, 06:22:47 PM »

Probably this or a variant:




Contains Fipronil which is not approved for hives... but it does work.

...DOUG
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Anybrew
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« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2010, 07:05:07 PM »

Thanks Doug, I will see if its available in Aussie Land.

Cheers
Steve
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AllenF
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« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2010, 08:26:26 PM »

Here is the beetle barn from the first clip.   http://www.gabees.com/store/product_info.php?cPath=41&products_id=571&osCsid=13f54d76a1537115baa9801b597a1704   They run a dollar (US) a piece when you buy in bulk.   
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AllenF
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« Reply #31 on: October 16, 2010, 08:47:47 PM »

And just to let everyone know, Checkmite is only approved for use in the beetle barns (or under cardboard strips and elsewhere in the hive) to kill Small Hive Beetles.  http://www.brushymountainbeefarm.com/Check-Mite-Plus-10-Strips/productinfo/481/
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AllenF
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« Reply #32 on: October 16, 2010, 09:10:21 PM »

How to apply to the card board strips to the checkmite (using metric measurements for those downunder  Wink).
Prepare a piece of corrugated cardboard by peeling off and removing the surface of one side to expose the flutes within the cardboard. Cut the cardboard to approximately 22.5 cm along the flutes by 10 cm wide (across the flutes). Tape over the smooth side of the cardboard (the side opposite the flutes) with duct tape, shipping tape or similar tape to prevent the bees from chewing and removing cardboard, or use one-sided plastic corrugated sheets. Staple one strip of CheckMite+™ onto the centre of the corrugated side of the cardboard.

Place cardboard insert fitted with CheckMite+™ strips as near the centre of the bottom board as possible with the strip facing down, parallel to the width of the hive. Make sure the bottom board is clean and the insert lays flat on the bottom board. This allows the beetles to walk through the tunnels, but it prevents the bees from walking under the insert and being exposed to CheckMite+™. For detection, leave the strips in the hive for one week, then check for the presence of dead beetles. For treatment, leave the strips in the hive for a minimum of 42 days and a maximum of 45 days. DO NOT TREAT THE SAME COLONY WITH COUMAPHOS MORE THAN TWICE A YEAR. Honey supers may be replaced 14 days after strips are removed.
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Mason
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« Reply #33 on: October 19, 2010, 12:03:37 PM »

Quote
Contains Fipronil which is not approved for hives... but it does work.

This is what I use in the plastic corrugated traps. I slit them half way through with a razor blade,  apply poison in the center and seal them back up with black electrical tape leaving the holes on the end open.

Last year I was completely infested with beetles.  Several of these traps and a few days later not a single beetle in the hives with scores of them dead out front.  I do feel that it is possible under normal breeding conditions to control beetle populations with less chemically intrusive measures however more drastic circumstances call for more drastic measures.  If the beetles get out from under you for whatever reason this is a great way to regain control.

Beetles check in....then completely check out
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tecumseh
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« Reply #34 on: October 20, 2010, 07:07:59 AM »

a kd4/doug  snip..
Contains Fipronil which is not approved for hives... but it does work.

tecumseh:
I am not familiar with the product.  could you provide some further explanation?
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KD4MOJ
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« Reply #35 on: October 20, 2010, 07:31:23 AM »


tecumseh:
I am not familiar with the product.  could you provide some further explanation?

Quote
From the Wiki Fipronil is a broad spectrum insecticide that disrupts the insect central nervous system by blocking the passage of chloride ions through the GABA receptor and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCl), components of the central nervous system.

  Mainly used in roach bait. Next time you are in Walmart, Home Depot or Lowes, check out the section where you purchase ant and roach stuff and you will see the tubes. the Maxforce just contains a greater percentage of the active ingredient Fipronil.


  Again it's not approved in the USA. I did an experiment on a test hive using Checkmite in one beetle barn and the "gel" in another and it does work well. But I would not use it on a production hive.

...DOUG
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fish_stix
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« Reply #36 on: October 20, 2010, 12:34:17 PM »

The key to using Fipronil is to use a system which the bees cannot get to, but the SHB can. That's why you use the Beetle Barns or the corrugated plastic signboard traps. Fipronil is approved for use in food prep areas so I take that to mean there is no harmful fumes or residue that the bees can be harmed by. In Central FL we use traps or quit the beekeeping business; there is no alternative. We have one day hives and two day hives; meaning the time it takes for beetles to get in the hives in significant numbers. Some yards are worse than others but we have a MAJOR, MAJOR problem with SHB everywhere. Unprotected, our hives will be inundated with SHB larva in 1-2 weeks, yearround. For those who haven't experienced this pest, that means loss of the hive, as the bees abscond when the larva have taken over a couple frames. The Fipronil works extremely well, very few beetles make it back out of the trap; in fact, the signboard traps seem to retain the beetles even better than the Beetle Barns. I hate any kind of chemicals in my hives, but I also really like having bees to work with, so it's not an option to fail to protect them.
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AllenF
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« Reply #37 on: October 20, 2010, 02:06:32 PM »

  Again it's not approved in the USA. I did an experiment on a test hive using Checkmite in one beetle barn and the "gel" in another and it does work well. But I would not use it on a production hive.

...DOUG
KD4MOJ


Which one killed more beetles, the checkmite or the "gel"?
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Anybrew
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« Reply #38 on: October 20, 2010, 11:13:41 PM »

Hi guys thanks for the advice re SHB, I went this way with my hives, after seeing all the SHB running about I decided to attack them hard and fast.  First with my hive tool, boy are they quick.
Then I adapted some Coachroach baits by squashing them and taping them up so the Bee's couldn't get in them and I also got some roach gel and gave each one a squirt in the baits as well.

I placed the baits at the back of the hives in the corners,that was sunday.

Tuesday I went around my hives just for a quick look, I didn't see any dead SHB and only saw one running beetle who was quickly squashed.

I will leave the baits in for about 10 weeks to try and break the breeding cycle.
ps, the Bee's appear not to care at all about the baits and I haven't seen an increase in dead bee's at the front of the hives.

Cheers
Steve
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AllenF
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« Reply #39 on: October 21, 2010, 04:52:44 PM »

In a few weeks the bees will have the holes to your beetle traps glued shut.   You will have to keep the holes open.
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