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Author Topic: latex gloves  (Read 1876 times)
FRAMEshift
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« on: July 19, 2010, 11:28:20 AM »

What do you guys think of wearing latex gloves, like a doctor wears during an exam?  I have heard that you can still do tasks requiring fine movements (like picking up a queen) but the gloves reduce the severity of a sting.  Can the bees sting through latex (I'm guessing yes) and do latex gloves reduce the depth of the sting or the amount of venom that is injected?  Do latex gloves keep the stinger from remaining attached to the sting site?
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AllenF
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« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2010, 12:24:07 PM »

About half of the time, I am using the blue nitrile gloves.  They are good at keeping the bee glue off your hands.   I have not gotten stung through them, but your hands do sweat.   And they will tear on the corners of metal covers.
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FRAMEshift
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« Reply #2 on: July 19, 2010, 01:25:57 PM »

I have some blue nitriles but they are really thick and clumsy.  Maybe ok for moving frames but not for delicate work.  Or maybe you have a different type of glove.  Where did you get yours?  Brand name?
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dogdrs
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« Reply #3 on: July 19, 2010, 02:25:25 PM »

I am a vet in my "real" job.  I usually go bare handed with most of my hives, but with some of my testier hives I use surgical gloves because they have a long cuff and go over my sleaves.  The store bought nitrile or latex gloves (doesn't matter what brand) protect your hands just fine but the bees always seem to go for that gap at your wrist.  I think the bees don't like to try to sting through the glove.  They can, because I have gotten stung but it's not nearly as painful and they more often just crawl on them wondering what they are.  I have never been able to use the bulky leather gloves.  I think some of the heavier nitrile gloves are also a little bulky
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BjornBee
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« Reply #4 on: July 19, 2010, 02:31:51 PM »

Latex exam gloves do a couple different things....

Bees can not latch on the latex gloves that well. So thy end up bouncing off, or figure it is a substance not what they are seeking to sting through.

They can sting through the latex. But the effort allows you to feel the slight vibration and flick the bee off prior to the sting.

Almost all my stings through the latex are from me pressing on a bee while picking something up.

I'll get 10-20 stings all day long with no gloves, but that is working many hives over a long day. With the latex gloves. I'll maybe get one.

But they really make my hands sweat.
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FRAMEshift
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« Reply #5 on: July 19, 2010, 03:11:04 PM »

I am a vet in my "real" job.  I usually go bare handed with most of my hives, but with some of my testier hives I use surgical gloves because they have a long cuff and go over my sleaves.  The store bought nitrile or latex gloves (doesn't matter what brand) protect your hands just fine but the bees always seem to go for that gap at your wrist.  I think the bees don't like to try to sting through the glove.  They can, because I have gotten stung but it's not nearly as painful and they more often just crawl on them wondering what they are.  I have never been able to use the bulky leather gloves.  I think some of the heavier nitrile gloves are also a little bulky
I like the idea of a longer cuff.  Do you use the polyisoprene?  As Bjorn says, the latex really make my hands sweat.  Is there any material that is better from a sweat standpoint?  Can you recommend a particular supplier and model number. 
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wildbeekeeper
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« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2010, 03:23:31 PM »

I use nitrile gloves, poder free and get them in packs of 100 for about $15 at the local pharmacy.  I get stung through them but as mentioned beforte only when i unintentionally squeeze a bee or they get me at the wrist!  Hands do sweat alot but it doesnt impact your ability to work...i like being able to still feel but not get all sticky.  When i do get stung, the stinger doesnt usually stick in the skin, just the glove so it does minimize the impact a littke bit.
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greenbtree
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« Reply #7 on: July 19, 2010, 04:38:01 PM »

You can also get Nitrile gloves in places like farm supply stores (i.e. Tractor Supply or Farm & Fleet).  They are only a tiny bit heavier than latex.

JC
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AllenF
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« Reply #8 on: July 19, 2010, 04:42:18 PM »

I got my box from Grainger. 
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Stubee
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« Reply #9 on: July 19, 2010, 05:36:42 PM »

I have a pair of neoprene gloves that you can get at Cabela's. They are tight fitting and I find I have acceptable dexterity with them. Bee's can't sting through them, or haven't so far. In fact saved me from a sting to the palm today, while I was transfering a Nuc to a regular hive body. Saw the little bugger try to sting me while i was lifting a frame out of the nuc. the gloves are hot and if you were doing it all day they probally won't work, but good for a hobby guy like me.
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stu
gardeningfireman
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« Reply #10 on: July 19, 2010, 05:46:55 PM »

I use latex exam gloves sometimes, but the nitrile ones are better. The bees can sting through them, but the result is greatly reduced. Usually I use the long cuffed yellow gloves that are used for washing dishes. Fewer stings, cheap, disposable if torn. Great for cutouts.
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dogdrs
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« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2010, 10:41:47 AM »

FRAMEshift,
I get my surgical gloves from one of my distributors called MWI, the gloves are made by Ansell healthcare. I don't know that you would be able to order them without an account.  They are made of latex and they do make your hands sweat but since I'm in Florida, I  am used to sweating all over while working the bees.  They are also tougher than the storebought exam gloves and I can go through several hives without any tears in them.  As I said, most of the time I go bare handed.  I don't know about the "sweat factor" for other types except  nitrile.  You may be able to check with a local human hospital or veterinarian and see if they would be willing to sell you a box.
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skflyfish
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« Reply #12 on: July 20, 2010, 02:07:17 PM »

I use latex gloves, but I am lifting the training wheels with them, so to speak.  Wink

I accidentally found out that if the end of a finger is missing, the sweat would drain out. So now I cut the tips of the fingers and thumb off, which makes the gloves less sweaty, they dry quicker and I get some better feel with the end of the finger exposed. So far I have been lucky and not been stung on the end of the finger. Yes they can sting through the latex, but it has only happened a few times for me.

I have yet to go glove-less, but am getting closer.  grin

Jay
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ProPacific
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« Reply #13 on: July 20, 2010, 04:27:35 PM »

Good idea Jay! about the finger tips. I like the gloves to go over the sleeves to prevent any open areas that bees can crawl up.
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