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Author Topic: It's true  (Read 1120 times)

Offline drone1952

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It's true
« on: July 14, 2010, 11:06:51 AM »
I want help from the Forum.From some time I did read that in round hive  chalkbrood  it is not a problem.This is true?

Offline greenbtree

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Re: It's true
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2010, 02:17:05 AM »
The type of hive isn't an issue with chalkbrood.  If the hive is healthy to begin with and doesn't have other issues (like a heavy mite load) then it will be able to survive and recover from chalkbrood without any help.  The bees will dispose of the dead brood, clean up, and the hive will go on.

JC
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Offline rdy-b

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Re: It's true
« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2010, 02:20:08 AM »
I want help from the Forum.From some time I did read that in round hive  chalkbrood  it is not a problem.This is true?
    Tree trunks are round -still gets chalkbrood- :lol:  ;) RDY-B

Offline Scadsobees

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Re: It's true
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2010, 09:54:15 AM »
Chalkbrood is a fungus.  The last I checked there aren't any fungus's that are very skilled with a compass.  :-D

It is related to several functions....humidity, hive health, and genetics.  Prolonged high humidity (rain) can trigger an outbreak, stronger, more hygienic hives can eliminate it quickly.  Occasionally there will be poor genetics/hygiene and a queen will need to be replaced, but under most circumstances the hive can clear it out on their own.
Rick