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Author Topic: First Trap Out(s)  (Read 1667 times)
dp
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« on: June 30, 2010, 02:04:10 AM »

I did a few trap outs this weekend.  Read the "how to" trap out thread over and over, and was pretty prepared.  Couple of items of interest. 

Bee's didn't seem to care about us setting up the trap out, but about an hour later when the homeowner showed up, he got chased around a little and finally stung on the wrist.  He was good about it, but he must have had a special smell, because we were standing right next to him for about 1/2 hour and the bees could have cared less about us.

Went back to that trap out today, honey pouring out of the wall?  Why would that be?  Puddle on the deck below.  Bee's are sucking up a lot before it falls to the deck, but not keeping up.  This is a very large hive that has been in the wall for about 5+ years.  Bees were pretty aggressive and I got stung once for my efforts.

Question- I put a frame of brood/honey in the trap out hive body.  When the bee's go in, will they nurse the new emerging bees?  Will they raise a queen?

It been fun.  I definitely didn't do everything right, but I learned and will adjust next time.  Hoping to try a cut out this weekend.   
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iddee
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« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2010, 09:34:58 AM »

Answer...Yes, they will nurse the brood. If there are eggs or 1 day larva, they will make queen cells.

What is the day temp? Without the ability to bring in water, they may not be able to cool the hive. If so, the temps can be deadly.
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dp
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« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2010, 10:16:54 AM »

Temps have been in the 70's.  Not bad.  So...if they can't bring in water, is that why the honey is dripping?  Have you seen the honey drip out like that before? 

I've attached a picture of the trap out set up, but I got stung before I could get pictures of the "dripping".



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iddee
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« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2010, 10:33:11 AM »

You have me stumped as to why the honey is dripping. Possibly mice in the wall? Do you have SHB in the area? I have never had that happen.

The reason you got stung is likely that the box is too far from the cone. There are many more bees in the air than I normally see. I would place another bracket to the right of those, and use a couple of 2X's to raise the porch, to the bottom of the cone.

Similar to this:

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kathyp
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« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2010, 10:40:28 AM »

with that honey coming out...robbing? 

another opening allowing robbing and causing the dripping honey?
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dp
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« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2010, 10:52:57 AM »

It was a difficult location to try to get it set up as you suggest. The picture doesn't show, but the opening to the hive was a gap in the 2x6 that was a couple of feet long. I tried to get it reduced to about 6" and plugged the rest with screen. I was also attempting go keep the hive deep out of the homeowners view, as that is the deck off the master bdr. I appreciate your suggestions, and I'm have learned a lot and obviously it is only the tip of the iceberg.
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iddee
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« Reply #6 on: June 30, 2010, 11:12:48 AM »

>>>>I was also attempting go keep the hive deep out of the homeowners view,<<<<

To each his own, but I try to make it as viewable to the homeowner as possible, so they can call me with updates. It saves me a lot of gas and time.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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dp
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« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2010, 11:54:15 AM »

Some things learned or learning on my first trap outs:

1) If there is a hole that you can't see, they will!!!  Checked the trap out that I attached pictures of, had about 2 frames of bees in the deep, with what appears to be a supercedure cell.  They were feeding the larvae that was in it.  Also noticed that bees were getting back into the hive in the wall through a couple of spots that didn't appear anything could have gotten through!!!!  Well, I got it all sealed up now (at least I hope).  I'm sure this will be like starting over, as they have been getting back in to feed the main hive.

2) Trap out #2 was out of a tree.  Last time I visited it, there wasn't much activity coming out of the tree.  Yesterday, there wasn't anything coming out.  I set this trap on June 28.  I checked my deep, and found about 2 frames of bees, with a QUEEN.  I was so excited.  So, do you think this queen came out of the tree, or do you think they raised one?  Now, do I remove the cone if there are no more bees coming out and let them rob the old hive, or will they just return there?
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iddee
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« Reply #8 on: July 10, 2010, 12:13:09 PM »

Trap out #2.....

They did not raise a queen in 10 days. If the swarm had just moved into the tree, she likely came out. If it was an old colony, they may have swarmed and you have the swarm queen. Maybe you accidentally brought the queen from your hive.
The cone needs to stay on the tree until all bees are out. It takes 3 weeks for the eggs to emerge, even if she quit laying the first day you set the trap. Then another week for them to fly.

NO, the tree isn't empty, unless they died.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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dp
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« Reply #9 on: July 10, 2010, 12:20:16 PM »

So on trap #1, do you think they are raising a queen?  It appeared to be a supercedure cell, but had larvae in it that they were obviously feeding.

On Trap #2, it was an established hive, though didn't appear to be a very large one.  I didn't bring a queen, because I swept all of the bees off the frame before I took it.

So, if the rest of the bees absconded and I only end up with two frames, would it be best to transfer it to a nuc and let them fill it up for winter?  Will a hive with two frames have a chance to make it through the winter?  Should I feed them when I bring them home, and continue to feed them until winter?
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iddee
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« Reply #10 on: July 10, 2010, 12:48:29 PM »

#1... An emergency cell looks the same as a supercedure cell. Yes, they are raising a queen.

#2...I think bees will continue to emerge from the cone, whether you see them or not, for a minimum 4 more weeks. Feeding them while on the trap site would help. Be careful of robbing from neighboring hives while feeding.

Then continue feeding until they have enough stores to make it through an Oregon winter.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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Irwin
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« Reply #11 on: July 10, 2010, 12:56:46 PM »

#1... An emergency cell looks the same as a supercedure cell. Yes, they are raising a queen.

#2...I think bees will continue to emerge from the cone, whether you see them or not, for a minimum 4 more weeks. Feeding them while on the trap site would help. Be careful of robbing from neighboring hives while feeding.

Then continue feeding until they have enough stores to make it through an Oregon winter.
It's only 9 month's out of a year grin
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dp
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« Reply #12 on: July 10, 2010, 01:10:31 PM »

so would you crowd them in a nuc, or let them try to fill out a deep? 

Iddee, I also took your advice on hive #1 and moved the deep closer to the original entrance.  I re-read your post about "once a worker finds her way back in, it is nearly impossible to make the trap out work".  I hope your wrong this time.  I can't believe how small some of the other entrances can be!!!  Even though you did a very thorough job of outlining a trap out, I guess every one of them is a learning experience.  It would have been very difficult without your outline though.  I'm having fun doing it and hopefully will have 4 or 5 hives going into the winter, when I only started with two Smiley
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iddee
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« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2010, 01:17:48 PM »

Yes, every one is a new experience. Also, my posts are only an outline. The details have to be filled in on site, and I'm sure the bees have much more to teach than I have learned so far. They will always come up with something new.


Irwin, nuc or 10 frame in that area this time of year?
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

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AllenF
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« Reply #14 on: July 10, 2010, 01:51:35 PM »

I like the way you mounted the hive to the house. 
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Irwin
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« Reply #15 on: July 10, 2010, 02:26:24 PM »

Yes, every one is a new experience. Also, my posts are only an outline. The details have to be filled in on site, and I'm sure the bees have much more to teach than I have learned so far. They will always come up with something new.


Irwin, nuc or 10 frame in that area this time of year?
I have four ten frame hives. one deep one med for brood chamber for over winter they move down in the deep and fill the med with honey for winter. my one hive at home has four honey supers on now just about ready to add #5 all the other 3 have 3 honey supper's on but over winter the same way as the one at home
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dp
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« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2010, 02:13:45 PM »

So I checked trap #2 today.  I watched the cone for ~10 minutes, nothing coming out.  This hive had been in this tree for a few months before the trap out??  This is the trap that I've apparently gotten the queen?  So...should I take my hive home, or leave it for 3-4 more weeks as is?  Should I remove the cone and let these bees rob the honey/pollen out of the hive, or would I risk the bees returning to their old home?
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iddee
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« Reply #17 on: July 11, 2010, 04:40:59 PM »

You can remove the cone and watch the bees going in and out of the tree for a few days. If they are carrying pollen, reinstall cone. If not, they should ignore the tree after day 3 or 4.
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"Listen to the mustn'ts, child. Listen to the don'ts. Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me . . . Anything can happen, child. Anything can be"

*Shel Silverstein*
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