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Author Topic: Large queen cells burried in honey comb  (Read 919 times)
bugleman
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« on: June 25, 2010, 04:44:27 PM »

I want to know from someone who is experience in raising quality queens.

I have a strong cell builder/finisher and I should have left them a little overhead storage space.  Hence the nectar flow really kicked in and are burrying the queen cells in honey comb.

Can I carefully free the queen cell from the bulk of the honey comb then place them in a nuk and expect the queens to hatch?
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asprince
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« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2010, 07:39:04 PM »

Yes, Here are instructions written by iddee:


Start with a drawn frame. About 2 inches apart, cut at a 45 degree angle, vertically, 2 cuts. The 45 making the bottom of the cuts come out touching each other. Now cut across top and bottom and remove the V shaped comb.

Then cut the same size from the cell frame, with the cell in the center of it. Set the cell into the drawn frame and mash the edges in enough to secure it.

The bees will make the repairs.


Steve
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hardwood
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« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2010, 06:48:46 PM »

They often start building comb around the queen cells. Luckily it's fresh soft comb and can usually be gently pried away from the cell. If you carefully handle the cells (no gloves for sure on this) you can cut the new comb away with a sharp knife.

Scott
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bugleman
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« Reply #3 on: June 27, 2010, 11:44:15 AM »

Yes.

Thanks Scott!

I was dilligent in removing the the comb and gave them a little room and things are sorted out.  It seems I lost a couple of the larger cells due to damage and need to be more carefull next time.

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bugleman
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« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2010, 02:17:40 AM »

It looks like the bees know where the queen cell ends and they broomed the wax back a bit.

All is well in this department.
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