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Author Topic: foundation in early days  (Read 1952 times)

Offline burny

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foundation in early days
« on: May 16, 2005, 06:57:15 AM »
what did they use in the earlier years of beekeeping for foundation in frames? just wondering....brookie,or burny or whoever i am.

Offline Jerrymac

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foundation in early days
« Reply #1 on: May 16, 2005, 07:29:07 AM »
I would imagine that they let the bees build from scratch.
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Offline Miss Chick-a-BEE

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foundation in early days
« Reply #2 on: May 16, 2005, 09:06:31 AM »
I don't know the full history of beekeeping devolopment. But I would imagine it went from logs and skeps, to maybe a top bar arrangement, until someone made a rolling press that could shape out the cells from pure wax. They might have even used flat pieces of wax for a time.

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Offline Michael Bush

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foundation in early days
« Reply #3 on: May 16, 2005, 11:10:31 AM »
I assume we mean as movable comb.  Obviously in skeps and box hives the bees built whatever they wanted.

The greek top bar/basket hives had top bars with a curved bottom on them to encourage the bees to build in the center.

http://www.outdoorplace.org/beekeeping/graphics/greek_hive.gif

Huber used a piece of comb cut out and braced into the frame.

http://www.bushfarms.com/images/Huber.1.jpg

Langstroth used a beveled top bar and side bars and center bar as a comb guide.

http://www.beeclass.com/DTS/briefh6.gif

Even after the invention of foundation many beekeepers used (and still use) starter strips of either blank sheets of wax or cut pieces of foundation.

http://www.bushfarms.com/images/PrimaryCombOnBlankStarterStrip.JPG

or beveled top bars

http://www.bushfarms.com/images/FoundationlessFrame2.JPG
http://www.bushfarms.com/images/DadantDeep1.jpg
http://www.bushfarms.com/images/FoundationlessDrawn.JPG
http://www.bushfarms.com/images/KTBHComb.JPG
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Offline burny

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thank you
« Reply #4 on: May 16, 2005, 06:13:27 PM »
thanks for info and pictures.
           burny

Offline taw

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foundation presses invented in late 1800's I believe
« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2005, 08:18:14 PM »
Moveable frames were invented prior to langstroth's great discovery of bee-space. And sometime after that the first foundation press was invented... by dadant I believe. I would assume that natural comb on those early frames was what occured.
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