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Author Topic: how do you define "local" honey?  (Read 2941 times)
bigbearomaha
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« on: June 17, 2010, 08:08:30 PM »

I have talked to some folks around here and it's interesting the variety in answers  I get.  some say within 5 miles radius of the area, some have said within 100 miles radius.

what is "local" honey to you?

Big Bear
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hardwood
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« Reply #1 on: June 17, 2010, 08:24:52 PM »

To me it's defined by your local flora, Most (I find) that are concerned about the honey being "local" are searching for allergy relief. As long as your flora and theirs are similar I would consider that local.

Of course most of my customers are within my county.

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2010, 08:43:28 PM »

so, by what you said, perhaps if one looked into their USDA plant hardiness zone, most of the types of flora should be similar if you live in say, zone 5, to other areas in zone 5, even though there may several miles in between sources?

This I am thinking would be in relation to generalized "wildflower" honey.

Big Bear
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hardwood
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2010, 09:02:10 PM »

Quite possibly...however there is also a "local food" movement that strives to support truly local producers of goods which enhances local economies and nurtures diversity.

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2010, 10:55:36 PM »

From Wiki

Definitions of "local"

The definition of "local" or "regional" has for a long time been flexible and defined differently depending on the person in question. Neither the USDA nor any legal authority has adopted a definition.

Some local business with specific retail and production focuses, such as cheese, may take a larger view of what is 'local' while a local farm may see the area with in a day's driving as local because it is a reasonable distance to transport goods and services—in fact, 400 miles is essentially a DGD (day-goods-distance). Some see "local" as being a very small area (typically, the size of a city and its surroundings), others suggest the ecoregion or bioregion size, while others refer to the borders of their nation or state. The concept of "locally-processed" however has recently been introduced by the produce industry including organic produce wholesalers and retailers. This is potentially a dubious concept as it appears to be an excuse to ship across country and re-package in order to retain the "local" definition. This would enable huge processors to retain a local edge theoretically anywhere on the planet.

Some proponents of "local food" consider that the term "local" has little to do with distance or with the size of a "local" area. For example, some see the American state of Texas as being "local", although it is much larger than some European countries. In this case, transporting a food product across Texas could involve a longer distance than that between northern and southern European countries. It is also argued that national borders should not be used to define what is local. For example, a cheese produced in Alsace (France) is likely to be more "local" to German people in Frankfurt, than to French people in Marseille.

The concept of "local" is also seen in terms of ecology, where food production is considered from the perspective of a basic ecological unit defined by its climate, soil, watershed, species and local agrisystems, a unit also called an ecoregion or a foodshed. The concept of the foodshed is similar to that of a watershed; it is an area where food is grown and eaten. The size of the foodshed varies depending on the availability of year round foods and the variety of foods grown and processed. In a way, replacing the term 'water' with 'food' reconnects food with nature. "The term "foodshed" thus becomes a unifying and organizing metaphor for conceptual development that starts from a premise of the unity of place and people, of nature and society." [5]

Where local food is determined by the distance it has traveled, the wholesale distribution system can confuse the calculations. Fresh food that is grown very near to where it will be purchased, may still travel hundreds of miles out of the area through the industrial system before arriving back at a local store. This is seen as a labeling issue by local food advocates, who suggest that, at least in the case of fresh food, consumers should be able to see exactly how far each food item has traveled.




IMO, I think local is if it was grown in the same county as you.
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hardwood
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2010, 11:00:32 PM »

In other words...what I said grin

Scott
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"In the first place, we should insist that if the immigrant who comes here in good faith becomes an American and assimilates himself to us, he shall be treated on an exact equality with everyone else, for it is an outrage to discriminate against any such man because of creed, or birthplace, or origin. But this is predicated upon the person's becoming in every facet an American, and nothing but an American...There can be no divided allegiance here. Any man who says he is an American, but something else also, isn't an American at all. We have room for but one flag, the American flag...We have room for but one language here, and that is the English language...And we have room for but one sole loyalty and that is a loyalty to the American people."

Theodore Roosevelt 1907
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« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2010, 11:21:56 PM »

Pollen from the same plants can be different in regards to the area they come from. Goldenrod may be the same over a broad area or hardiness zones, covering many states. But the makeup of pollen from a plant in Pennsylvania can be very different from the same species of goldenrod growing two states away.

Analysing pollen from certain plants has been used to pinpoint a particular area. In some CSI cases, even the leaf and seeds can be used to pinpoint a particular area, even though the species of plant grew in many locations.

Because of this, and for allergy relief in particular, 50 miles is considered local for honey. Within the 50 mile range, the pollen should be very similar and would be beneficial.

Local for honey may be different than something like strawberries. When I see a sign "local strawberries" I do not anticipate or expect that they came from three counties over. I expect them to be from down the road a bit.

A side story....I once asked some questions in a health food store that was selling honey. I asked where they purchased their honey. They said "over at Dutch Gold". Dutch Gold is a huge packer that imports from various countries. I asked how they could consider that "local honey". They said they "bought" it local, so that was local to them.  rolleyes
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2010, 11:26:42 PM »

Our farmers' market accepts products from a 50 mile radius.  That is considered "local". 
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