Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
December 25, 2014, 12:49:53 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: ATTENTION ALL NEW MEMBERS
PLEASE READ THIS OR YOUR ACCOUNT MAY BE DELETED - CLICK HERE
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Do I need to re-queen?  (Read 3262 times)
Blackbird
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


Location: Santa Cruz, California USA


« on: May 14, 2005, 04:43:54 PM »

I caught  two swarms last sunday the 8th of May and combined them into one hive on Monday. I inspected this hive on Friday the 13th and found the queen, she's big and fat, very beautiful looking, but I found no eggs/brood what so ever.
Given that they were two swarms and there was another queen that she had to fight and kill would it be normal for her not to have started laying yet? Should I give her a little time before I re-queen or is she a dud that I need to re-queen right away?
My other swarm that I've had for about 3 weeks started laying right away.
She has a beautiful solid laying pattern, text book perfect.

Thanks,
Stacie
Logged
Bee Boy
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 211

Location: Illinois


« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2005, 05:57:33 PM »

Since you only got her a few days ago, i would say wait. It could take her up to a week to start laying eggs.
Logged

Bee Boy
Horns Pure Honey
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 148

Location: Illinois


« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2005, 08:05:07 PM »

Nothing to worry about, just sit back and wait.  Cheesy
Logged

Ryan Horn
Saucy
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 23


Location: London England


« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2005, 02:11:53 AM »

Stacie

Were the swarms large (the size of a football) or small (the size of a fist)?

The former could have been a main swarm containing a mature queen  but if the latter could have been afterswarms (or casts) which would or could contain virgin queens. If so, they would still need to mate so may take a few days yet before being in the position to start laying.
Logged
Blackbird
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


Location: Santa Cruz, California USA


« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2005, 01:20:57 PM »

Both swarms were the same size, smaller than a football but not super small.

So a virgin queen will swarm? Some how I thought the queen would mate before she left with the swarm.
Thanks for the info.

Stacie
Logged
taw
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


Location: Youngsville, NC


« Reply #5 on: May 16, 2005, 06:53:19 PM »

Quote from: Blackbird
Both swarms were the same size, smaller than a football but not super small.

So a virgin queen will swarm? Some how I thought the queen would mate before she left with the swarm.
Thanks for the info.

Stacie


And that mating flight might take a couple weeks.
Logged

<Insert witty signature here>
Blackbird
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 126


Location: Santa Cruz, California USA


« Reply #6 on: May 17, 2005, 01:30:37 AM »

So how long do I give this queen? If she takes another week to start laying that is a long time with out fresh bees coming in. At what point do I know if she is a did or not? I'd rather requeen sooner than later.
Logged
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2005, 05:50:26 AM »

First, main swarm leave the hive with old queen. That happens normally when queen cells are capped. After a week first virgin queens emerge and second swarm leaves.

After  10 days from emerging new queen starts to lay eggs.
It depends how long queen has been in the hive. If it is rainy days, swarm can have several queens, old and new ones. Swarm can be on it's way a couple of days.

When you catch a swarm it can have what ever age queen.

When queen have it's mate flight  it may take 2-3 days when it swells and starts to lay eggs.  

It is better to change the queen of swarm, because it has inherit the desire of swarming.  But it is better do when queen has layed eggs 1 month.


When virgin queen start to lay eggs it can also swarm if the hive is full of honey and there is no space for brood.
Logged
Michael Bush
Universal Bee
*******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 13978


Location: Nehawka, NE


WWW
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2005, 09:48:58 AM »

As mentioned an afterswarm will have a virgin queen.  It make take as long as two weeks for the virgin queen to start laying.

Swarms have an energy I don't like to interfere with, so I never requeen them.  If they think they need a new queen they will replace her.
Logged

Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Finsky
Super Bee
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2791


Location: Finland


« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2005, 12:41:12 PM »

Quote from: Michael Bush

Swarms have an energy I don't like to interfere with, so I never requeen them.  If they think they need a new queen they will replace her.


To me is important to get a bee branch-  or what it is- which is not eager o swarm. I stopped Carniola beekeeping because they were too anxious to fill the world Tongue
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.169 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page December 20, 2014, 07:36:16 AM