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Author Topic: How far?  (Read 1024 times)
hilreal
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« on: June 05, 2010, 12:37:05 PM »

Someone asked me today how far bees will crawl from the point of entry into a structure i.e. attic, crawl space, etc to start building their colony.  What is the furthest you have seen the comb from the entry point?
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pondman
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2010, 05:17:38 PM »

Did a cutout a few weeks ago. From the top where there were going into the bottom of comb was 7 feet. I got over 5lb of bees. The lady told me they had been there for 4 years she knowed of.
Pondman
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JP
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« Reply #2 on: June 05, 2010, 07:24:12 PM »

In vertical void spaces, they mostly go to the top plate and build downwards. I've done some in 12' ceilings. Here's one: http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus/May62008#5197464836342079474

Between floor joists they most always begin building just on the other side of the band board, going as deep as the void space will allow them, but... They only seem to go so far, even when very mature. Longest one I ever did was twelve and a half feet long. Most are no longer than 9', with the average maximum somewhere between 6 -8'.

Now throw in to the equation human intervention and things can change quite drastically. Once the colony is established say for example some person decides to caulk and seal the original entrance, if the bees can find another way in to get to the hive, they will. I had a fellow do this very thing and bees were entering 18' from the original entrance to get to the hive.

Rule of thumb before a cut out, ask a million questions, even ask neighbors about the colony/colonies. You'd be amazed at what you can find out from neighbors.


...JP
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hilreal
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« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2010, 04:12:12 PM »

Interesting.  Question was asked by a church where the bees are going in at the top of an 8 foot brick wall next to the sanctuary.  Wall is brick on both sides.  Attaches to a cathedral ceiling which goes way, way up with a lot of wires, lights etc.  My suspicion is that the bees are going down between the 2 brick walls rather than into the ceiling (not a lot of space and very hot).  No attic just drywall, insulation? and then roofing.  His question was if they are not in the wall how far up the ceiling might they go before starting their comb.  Church is fairly new construction.
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hardwood
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« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2010, 07:08:15 PM »

Is this structure brick over wood frame or over block? The space (wythe) between the brick and the sub structure is not sufficient for bees to build comb. If the bees are going in close to the eave they may be in the soffit but they're more likely in the wall I would think. Anyway those are the places I'd start looking.

Scott
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asprince
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« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2010, 08:34:11 PM »

Sounds as though this might be a good candidate for a trap out. I now prefer a trap out over a cut out when I have a choice.

Steve
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hilreal
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« Reply #6 on: June 08, 2010, 03:30:50 PM »

Thought about the trapout but due to the construction too many entrances and exits to seal effectively.
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