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Author Topic: Top bar guide  (Read 2769 times)
DavidBee
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« on: March 03, 2010, 09:13:11 AM »

I was contemplating what kind of guide to put on the top bars I was making. I considered all the options - line of wax, string, etc. I thought of beveling the top bar, but that's what I was doing when I cut my finger off with the table saw, which slowed progress somewhat and dampened enthusiasm for that project. Then I saw a piece of narrow half round molding in the shop, turned it over, and, voila, a perfect wedge! It's no problem to glue and nail with small finishing nails, even though the rounded part is down. (Wish I'd thought of that when I still had 10 fingers.) I just thought I'd pass that along.
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bbhb
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« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2010, 03:02:29 PM »

chamfer
lowes.com/pd_55289-746-EC995_?PL=1&productId=3058113
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doak
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« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2010, 09:36:48 PM »

can you get the 3 corner flat sides? Or if you have a table saw cut some. Use 1x anything and set your blade at the 45 angle. :)doak
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2010, 09:55:08 PM »

There is a much safer way to make triangular stock with a table saw instead of setting your blade at 45 degrees.  Rip square cross sections first and then rip them cross cornered using a jig that fully supports them in that position and has zero blade clearance.  Yes you will probably have to do one 45 degree rip to make the jig - unless you have a sliding compound miter saw.  A picture would make it really, simply clear. I'll see if I can come up with one.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

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slaphead
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« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2010, 11:03:21 PM »

1/4" cut down the length of the bar (in the middle) and glue in a 1/2" wide by 1/4" deep strip of wood.

Easy to do on a table saw or router table but use a push stick  Wink

SH
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Natalie
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« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2010, 11:05:33 PM »

Sorry to hear about your finger.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2010, 11:27:18 PM »

You can buy Chamfer molding which is cheaper than quarter round (not as good of wood or finish but good enough for bees).  If they don't stock it you can order it.  You can also buy table saws that will shut off if you come in contact with the blade.  I keep meaning to buy one.  I'm sure it would be worth it.  I knew a carpenter who had been running power saws of all kinds for more than 50 years and never cut himself.  Ran his thumb through the saw  one day.  It only takes a second.  Luckily he had the blade at minimum depth so it only cut a groove in his thumb, but it was not the same after that.  Distractions can happen to anyone at any time.
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Michael Bush
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doak
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« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2010, 11:31:05 PM »

I never run mine with out the push board. I also stand off set to the line of the cut peice. Kick backs are he--. shocked :)doak.
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DavidBee
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« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2010, 08:12:31 AM »

I mispoke - it was actually shoe molding. Quarter round with the wedge shape to fit at the juncture of the wall and floor. it's just what I had in the shop, but I'll look at chamfer moilding as you suggested to finish the project.

As for the accident, I was, in fact, reaching for a push stick with myleft hand lightly resting on the board in the saw when it kicked back. And it takes much less than a second!
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slaphead
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« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2010, 10:52:01 PM »

Hi DavidBee,

You may have had some bad luck but you've sure kept a great attitude. 

Looking forward to hearing of your continuing adventures in beekeeping.

SH
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The only thing we have to fear is fear itself - FDR, 1933
Scadsobees
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« Reply #10 on: March 05, 2010, 08:53:45 AM »

You can also buy table saws that will shut off if you come in contact with the blade.  I keep meaning to buy one.  I'm sure it would be worth it. 

They probably sell more of those saws to fingerless carpenters than to anybody else.  rolleyes
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Rick
Michael Bush
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« Reply #11 on: March 05, 2010, 10:10:27 AM »

http://www.sawstop.com/media/MOV/Hot_Dog_Demo.htm
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Michael Bush
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luvin honey
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« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2010, 04:15:27 PM »

I never run mine with out the push board. I also stand off set to the line of the cut peice. Kick backs are he--. shocked :)doak.
Ditto. The bars were by far the most dangerous part of the job!
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RyanB
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« Reply #13 on: March 16, 2010, 12:20:56 PM »

Wow, that sawstop is awesome!  Wish I could afford one!
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trentfysty
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« Reply #14 on: May 17, 2010, 04:28:13 PM »

I am new to the forum and thought I would comment on this thread as making the topbars seems to be the biggest issue. My solution might not be the cheapest but it is safe. I happen to have a CNC machine and I cut them on there using a 90 degree V bit. I know not many people have a CNC machine but there are companies that will cut whatever you want on a CNC machine. If you provide the wood and the bars are not complicated I don't think they would charge much to do it. Just look for sign makers or CNC in your area. I think it would help especially if you are building multiple hives and you know they are going to be exactly the same. Just a thought.
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gardeningfireman
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« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2010, 09:47:49 PM »

I just cut a 1/8 inch deep groove down the center of the topbar, one sawblade wide, and glue three popsickle (craft) sticks into it. Simple, Safe, Quick! If you want, coat the edge of the popsickle sticks with wax.
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bigbearomaha
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« Reply #16 on: May 23, 2010, 01:09:20 PM »

I have top bars with only a line of wax melted down the center of them.  The bees have built from those just as fine as you please.

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DavidBee
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« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2010, 01:03:48 PM »

Just for an update, my girls are doing very well with the top bar guides. Comb is nice and stable. I also have two Langstroths with frames but no foundation. On one I just turned the wedge sideways and stapled them in. On the other (because the guy I bought the packages from was so negative) I put 1" strips of foundation in when I stapled wedges in sideways. They're doing well, but the combs made on the starter strips were pretty shaky until they got around to anchoring the comb to the top bar. I see no advantage to using a wax foundation starter strip, but if you do be sure it's well secured to the top bar, because the bees will start the comb down on the wax before anchoring it.
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