Need Bees Removed?
International
Beekeeping Forums
April 18, 2014, 12:17:55 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: 24/7 Ventrilo Voice chat -click for instructions and free software here
 
   Home   Help Search Calendar bee removal Login Register Chat  

Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Oxalic acid drip  (Read 3654 times)
sarafina
House Bee
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 339


Location: Houston, TX


« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2010, 07:47:27 PM »

Ok, that makes sense.

As far as I know I have the same queens that got dripped in Jan - i.e. I haven't re-queened nor found any queen cells from a supercedure.  I have seen no difference in their laying this year from last year when I did not drip.  The yellow hive is going gang-busters like it did last year and the blue hive is slower to build up.  I re-queened the blue one last summer but not because I re-queen regularly but because it had become too aggressive to work.  That set it back of course, so I don't have a full season history like I do my yellow hive but I didn't observe any negative effects on either queen.

I have never used any chemicals in either hive and this is my third year with the yellow hive and second year with the blue one.

Logged
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2010, 08:14:18 PM »

good to hear Sarafina.  I remember the posts about your hot colony. Im glad you got it under control.  Hope I never get one like that.  I always worry when I queen with queens from down south.  I have heard of a few incidents with packages here with queens from the south that turn into  vicious monsters.  Its not a matter of if but when it will happen with open mated queens from the south.  I hope to eliminate the need for southern queens next year or year after with wintered queens in nucs.  Not sure how I will do it yet but I hope to figure it out.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2010, 10:07:43 PM »

Finksi

 What month do you do you drip with oxalic acid.  Im thinking late October or November would be a good time. 


The best is to us is  late of Nobember or beginning of December when day temp is 0-5C.

.
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Xperiment
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26

Location: Santa Cruz


« Reply #23 on: June 06, 2010, 10:53:31 AM »



You can find out a lot of useful information about chemical compounds from Wikipedia.     

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalic_acid

I was looking for a compound with an acidity close to this that is soluble in my material that I can make the tetraalkyl ammonium salt of.

Thanks!

Yours
xperiment
Logged
bee-nuts
Queen Bee
****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1101


Location: Northwest Wisconsin


WWW
« Reply #24 on: June 06, 2010, 03:20:50 PM »

That is probably when Ill use it.  I looked at Menards for the acid and could not find it.  All I could find was some liquid wood bleach.  I think Im going to try a couple hardware stores today.  If that fails Ill order it on the net.
Logged

The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #25 on: June 07, 2010, 04:25:58 PM »


You can find out a lot of useful information about chemical compounds from Wikipedia.     

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalic_acid




This has nothing to do with beekeeping
Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Xperiment
New Bee
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 26

Location: Santa Cruz


« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2010, 12:29:50 AM »


You can find out a lot of useful information about chemical compounds from Wikipedia.     

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oxalic_acid




This has nothing to do with beekeeping



Only in your opinion.


In my opinion it is useful and often interesting to know about the chemicals I'm using.   Knowledge is multiplicative.  The more you know, the more you know.


yrs,
xperiment
Logged
Finski
Galactic Bee
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3928

Location: Finland


« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2010, 02:57:41 AM »





Only in your opinion.






I have studied chemistry in univestiry and kept bees 47 years. Yes, I have only my opinions.

Wiki knowledge: oxalic acid is in many plants  ---fine!

Look this list. The number  is percent :  carrot 0,5%,   in honey maximum 0,007%


http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/Data/Other/oxalic.html


Human risk
http://www.ema.europa.eu/pdfs/vet/mrls/089103en.pdf


.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2010, 03:11:41 AM by Finski » Logged

.
Language barrier NOT included
Pages: 1 [2]  All   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Beemaster's Beekeeping Ring
Previous | Home | Join | Random | Next
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines | Sitemap Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.175 seconds with 22 queries.

Google visited last this page January 22, 2014, 07:34:54 AM
anything