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Author Topic: Videos of Good Nectar Plants  (Read 14624 times)
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #40 on: July 31, 2011, 12:07:15 AM »

Milkweeds usually do great attracting bees, but I always recommend people have 3 to 5 plants (in 3 gallon size for each). That way there's plenty of milkweed to go around. The Monarchs won't nibble them to the ground, and they'll flower enough to get lots of pollinator attention. Be sure to plant A. incarnata someplace where it's slightly wet. It's the black sheep of the milkweed family in that it wants to grow around water, while other species such as A. tuberosa love being bone dry and are completely care free.

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Acebird
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« Reply #41 on: July 31, 2011, 10:38:51 AM »

Milkweed is for monarchs.  Don't get rid of your milkweed.  I believe the bees like it too.
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Apis_M_Rescue
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« Reply #42 on: August 13, 2011, 11:31:59 PM »

Went on day hike in Southern Callif. in canyon near San Gabriel mountain foothills & heard & seen bees foraging on buckwheat (Eriogonum fasciculatum) & scale broom (Lepidospartum squamatum). This video has a Tarantula Hawk joining in on the pollination/nectar gathering:

Foraging Tarantula Hawk & Honey Bees


Uploading the buckwheat now & will post momentarily.

Cheers, AMR
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Apis_M_Rescue
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« Reply #43 on: August 14, 2011, 12:07:14 AM »

Buckwheat still holding up late summer & bees loving it:

Honey Bees Foraging Southern California Buckwheat
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Pleasant words are as a honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.  Proverbs 16:24
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #44 on: September 26, 2011, 02:15:00 AM »

Liatris microcephala Buzzing


I was at a wholesale nursery this week and found the bees all over this Dwarf Shooting Star. Liatris microcephala is one of the smallest species in the genus, though I'm not sure how common it is to see it making clumps as big as what's in these pots. I'd love to know if anyone knows if that's typical and how many years it gets to be like something that big.

The honey bees were also all over assorted Russian Sage, Sage, a white flowering Mint that looked more like Catmint, and just about everything else that resembles Anise Hyssop now that we're past it's peak bloom.

Also this year I've planted a number of different Aster species. Specifically within the genus Symphyotrichum, but honeybees are passing right by them for their prized Symphotrichum novae-angliae, New England Aster. I already have several videos of that plant with honeybees all over it, so we don't need another at this time.

I have lots of Goldenrods too but I'm not seeing a lot of Honeybees working them yet either. And I find this surprising. They seem to favor Canadian Goldenrod, over Showy Goldenrod, 'Golden Fleas', ZigZag, and 'Fireworks'. Tall Goldenrod, Solidago altissima, has yet to start blooming here but when it has in the past it's always been a honeybee favorite.
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SerenaSYH
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« Reply #45 on: September 28, 2011, 02:10:53 AM »

hehe, movie magic music too!  grin Liatris microcephala looks very lovely.

MrILoveTheAnts, I also looked up your Symphotrichum novae-angliae, and I will have to get this plant.  :rainbowflower:I'm beginning to understand that honeybees are just crazy about certain shades of purple....

I am also needing taller plants besides climbing roses to help hide all that bare space beneath my raised patio too, and it seems that Symphotrichum novae-angliae would be the perfect height.

Merci beaucoup!
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Apis_M_Rescue
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« Reply #46 on: November 15, 2011, 04:23:48 AM »

This sweet fragrant bushy shrub started flowering w/ early rains this late October & bees are just loving it by the evidence of the harmonious symphony of buzzing while I passed by this deer resistant plant.

Shrub Marigold, Mexican Bush Marigold, Mount Lemmon Marigold, AKA Tagetes lemmonii
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Pleasant words are as a honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.  Proverbs 16:24
Apis_M_Rescue
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« Reply #47 on: November 15, 2011, 03:54:57 PM »

Bottle Brush AKA Callistemon citrinus Bee Forage


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Callistemon_citrinus

Seen the bees still foraging from October. Rains & colder days have kept this shrub/small tree going & new seeds are forming. Ants even on the flowers but my video portion of camera not able to capture. Let me see if can post photo here.

Bottle Brush AKA Callistemon citrinus    
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Pleasant words are as a honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.  Proverbs 16:24
MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #48 on: November 16, 2011, 01:35:07 AM »

Very nice both of them. Here on the east coast we have Bottlebrush Buckeye which has white flowers. I'm not sure if honeybees go to it but these plants are very popular with butterflies and hummingbirds.
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Apis_M_Rescue
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« Reply #49 on: December 11, 2011, 04:38:43 AM »

Mr.ILuvAnts glad you enjoyed seems ants & bees are crossing paths.

Caught this spectacular ant video here & has ant takeover of hive:

ANTS - Nature's Secret Power (Full)

 

Here is a carob tree I caught Nov 12th w/ the bees a buzzing for the flowers. After rains the bees were out in forces w/ audible buzz (unfortunately camera didn't catch more details). Not sure if were male or female flowered.

Mid Nov Autumn Honey Bee Forage in Carob Trees
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Pleasant words are as a honeycomb, sweet to the soul, and health to the bones.  Proverbs 16:24
Country Heart
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« Reply #50 on: December 12, 2011, 01:34:24 AM »

     bee    Looks like a great collection of videos.  I'll be back to watch more.     bee
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #51 on: May 09, 2012, 10:17:40 PM »

Alternate Leaf Dogwood, Cornus alternifolia


Alternate Leaf Dogwood, Cornus alternifolia
I found Honeybees using this little tree as a pollen source. And I can't complain about the amount of flowers.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #52 on: June 11, 2012, 07:39:30 PM »

Bees & Hairstreak butterflies on Asclepias speciosa milkweed, Somerset, CA 6-11-12


Here's someone's video with Honeybees on Showy Milkweed, Asclepias speciosa; it's a western species.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #53 on: July 04, 2012, 09:10:25 PM »

Honeybees on Native Plants

More Milkweed, Mountain Mint, and Buttonbush started getting attention this week. Anise Hyssop started flowering too but so far the bees aren't interested. I'm sure that will change in a week or so.
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annette
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« Reply #54 on: July 05, 2012, 08:22:13 PM »

Bees & Hairstreak butterflies on Asclepias speciosa milkweed, Somerset, CA 6-11-12

Here's someone's video with Honeybees on Showy Milkweed, Asclepias speciosa; it's a western species.


Somerset Ca is pretty close by to my house, but I have never seen any thing like this growing around near me. Probably someone planted them?? Not native to this area I believe.
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #55 on: July 05, 2012, 09:05:59 PM »

Bees & Hairstreak butterflies on Asclepias speciosa milkweed, Somerset, CA 6-11-12

Here's someone's video with Honeybees on Showy Milkweed, Asclepias speciosa; it's a western species.


Somerset Ca is pretty close by to my house, but I have never seen any thing like this growing around near me. Probably someone planted them?? Not native to this area I believe.


Showy Milkweed is native to all the western US. It probably grows best in irrigated ditches along the road.
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