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Author Topic: Observation Hive!  (Read 4784 times)
Ocean
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« on: January 11, 2006, 03:02:20 PM »

hey everyone, iam a second season beekeper, this seaason will be my second, i currently have 2 hives overwintered ( hope they'll do good ) since its my first time.

Well now i decided to buy an Observation Hive for my room.. Can you please recomment me a good Observation Hive, where can i buy one for a good price , not too expensive? and what are other things i will need to start my Observation hive this season Smiley

THanx alot everyone
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TwT
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Galactic Bee
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Location: Walker, La.

Ted


« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2006, 03:23:54 PM »

Ocean, they are high dollar, it would be cheapest to build one. here is one a friend that I meet this past spring built himself and it on his site with the plans, its a nice size and real nice looking OB hive. this is the OB hive im going to build this summer, turn table OB hive.

http://www.owensapiaries.net/obser_hives.htm
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

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Amateurs built the ark,
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2006, 08:37:49 PM »

There are things a like about a lot of them and things I don't like about all of them.

I've never seen one with correct space between the glass. It should be 1 3/4" to 1 7/8".  The Draper observation hive I have is about 2 1/2".  The Brushy Mt ones I have are 1 1/2".  I add a 1/4" screen molding to the Brushy Mt ones and they work great.  If they still sell them (call and ask) I'd buy one of theirs.  The brushy mt ones have a place to put a mason jar feeder too.

The Draper was more work to fix and it has a mixture of frame sizes.  An observation hive should have the size frames you use for brood in your operation.  I converted the Draper from 2 deeps and 2 shallows to 4 mediums and a homemade feeder.  The beespace was difficlult to deal with in the Draper.  The woodworking was nicer on the Draper.  The spinning bottom was verly nice so you can rotate it to look at the bees.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
TwT
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Ted


« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2006, 11:40:26 PM »

MB, on Bill's Ob hive I posted the picture of , he had SHB's in this OB hive and the bee's had the SHB's traped between the top bar of the frames and the glass, everytime a SHB would try to leave this spot a bee would herd it back down in between the glass and top bar piece. they was watching the SHB from top and bottom and keeping them there. it was interesting
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THAT's ME TO THE LEFT JUST 5 YEARS FROM NOW!!!!!!!!

Never be afraid to try something new.
Amateurs built the ark,
Professionals built the Titanic
Michael Bush
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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2006, 07:14:28 AM »

BTW there are pictures of my Draper hive on my web site.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Ocean
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« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2006, 09:20:20 AM »

so what you guys are basically saying that if you are handy you should just built your own observation hive?

hey and one more question
what are some popular sites to buy your packaged bees, i live in Northern New Jersey. The thing is i have 2 of my friends who are now interested to start beekeeping after i showed them how interesting it can be.

What are some good sites to buy their beginners kits and packaged bees?
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Ross
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2006, 10:24:06 AM »

Here you go.....
http://www.myoldtools.com/OBhive/OBhive.html
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Ocean
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« Reply #7 on: January 12, 2006, 11:51:26 AM »

Well I'm not the handy man, but my dad is, so i will pitch this great idea of making the observation hive myself and if we both agree on making one, i will take pictures of all the progress we will be having Smiley

I'm pretty sure if we do have any trouble, i can always turn to this forum, like i did in the past.

THanx alot everyone for your kindness.
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eejit
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« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2006, 11:00:34 AM »

How do you perform maintainance on your observation hive if it is in your living room?  huh
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2006, 07:07:57 PM »

You take it outside.  I have tried to come up with fancy valves etc. to block the bees when taking the hive outside to work it.  I have ended up with three pieces of thick cloth and three rubber band hair ties.  The nice thick cloth coated hair ties are easy to handle and work well.  I disconnect the hose and pin the two pieces of cloth between the outlet and the tube.  Then I get someone to hold one with the cloth covering the end while I put a rubber band on the exit on the hive to hold on the cloth.  Then I rubber band the tube.  Then I go outside and put a piece of cloth on there and rubber band that.  The outside one is so that when I go to reconnect everything I don’t have a traffic jam in the tube trying to get into the house.  Carry the hive outside and open it and work it.  Use smoke to get the bees off the edges as much as you can when you close up.  Brush any bees off the outside.  I do this once, move the hive a ways, and do it again.  Then I take the hive back in the house and put the two tubes against each other and remove the cloth as quickly as I can and reconnect things.  If I do this with a minimum amount of time of the tube being open, I almost never have a bee get into the house.  If they do they will just try to go out the window and you can catch them with a glass and a piece of paper.  Put the glass over the bee and slide the piece of paper under the glass.  You now have a bee in the glass.  Take it outside and let it go.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
Ross
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« Reply #10 on: January 20, 2006, 10:40:29 PM »

I go outside to the entrance and stuff a cloth into it.  I push in with a stick until it clears the first joint at the window.  Then I add another cloth just in the entrance to seal it.  When I go inside and break the tube, no bees can escape.  Unfortunately, it's not that easy to put it back together.  You have to pull the inside cloth and stick the tube back together pretty quick:).
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billruble
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« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2006, 05:02:36 PM »

Why did the one place say not to use glass?   I'd think glass would be easier to clean the plexaglass.  The plexaglass scratches to easily.
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Bill
Ross
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« Reply #12 on: March 06, 2006, 02:11:06 PM »

I guess some people are paranoid about glass breakage.  I haven't broken a window since I can remember, so I don't worry about.  Mine has glass.  I didn't do safey glass for a reason.  When safety glass breaks, it tends to completely collapse, which would free all of the bees.  When window glass breaks, especially when framed, it tends to crack into large pieces which quite often remain in place, containing the bees.  The large shards can be more dangerous if you really think it might get broken.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #13 on: March 15, 2006, 09:55:01 PM »

I wouldn't trust regular glass with my grandsons around.  The Draper is some kind of tempered glass and stands up well.  Plexi can be cleaned with FGMO followed by windex.  The glass, of course, can be scraped with a razor.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
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"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
fredtioga
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« Reply #14 on: April 07, 2006, 12:38:08 PM »

The writer suggest 1/2 inch space each side of the comb.
He has a protocol of care, and 15 years of use.

BTW why not use plexiglass over glass?
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #15 on: April 07, 2006, 02:39:53 PM »

>The writer suggest 1/2 inch space each side of the comb.
He has a protocol of care, and 15 years of use.

1/2 on each side would be 2".  At 2" they will burr up the glass a lot.  At 3/8" on each side they do much better.  Ideally if you leat them build their own comb 1/4" on each side gives you the most view, but comb from a hive seldom fits.

>BTW why not use plexiglass over glass?

I like them both. The glass is easy to clean, but difficult to get tempered glass the size you want.  Regular glass breaks very easily.  Plexi scratches very easily, but is easy to work with and doesn't break.  It's harder to clean.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
My book:  ThePracticalBeekeeper.com
-------------------
"Everything works if you let it."--Rick Nielsen
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