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Poll
Question: What kind of Beehive do you keep?
Langstroth - 25 (83.3%)
Top Bar Hive (TBH) (Kenyan or Tasmanian) - 0 (0%)
Imaginary - 0 (0%)
Skep - 0 (0%)
log gum - 0 (0%)
none - 0 (0%)
other (explain) - 5 (16.7%)
Total Voters: 29


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Author Topic: What kind of Beehive do you keep?  (Read 4907 times)
Apis629
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« on: May 07, 2005, 05:55:58 PM »

I was just currious about which hive styles were usefull, easily managed and, well, popular for ease of use.  I'm thinking of getting started in beekeeping again and this should weigh well on my decision for which type of hive to keep.
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #1 on: May 07, 2005, 05:59:34 PM »

You forgot a couple. The DE hive.

Actually mine are based on the Langstroth style but I build them a bit different.
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Apis629
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« Reply #2 on: May 07, 2005, 06:01:01 PM »

Whats a DE hive?  Oh, and, you said yours are a little different than a langstroth hive but, based on it.  Could I have a copy of plans for it by any chance?
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BigRog
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« Reply #3 on: May 07, 2005, 06:19:24 PM »

http://www.beeworks.com/D.E.Hive.htm

No plans but I don't think there are any around
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Jay
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« Reply #4 on: May 07, 2005, 06:43:35 PM »

Quote from: Apis629
I was just currious about which hive styles were usefull, easily managed and, well, popular for ease of use.  I'm thinking of getting started in beekeeping again and this should weigh well on my decision for which type of hive to keep.


Keep in mind that anything other than Langstroth is going to keep you from easily interchanging parts with others. i.e. if you buy a nuc, it will come with Langstroth frames, etc. Not to try to disuade you from any other style, I know plenty of people with D.E. and they are very happy with them, but not everybody has D.E. Hope this helps! Cheesy
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Robo
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« Reply #5 on: May 07, 2005, 06:45:51 PM »

I use my own design, combination of Langstroth, DE modified Langstroth, SBB.


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« Last Edit: December 04, 2007, 02:39:35 PM by Robo » Logged

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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2005, 08:33:52 PM »

I think langstroth is ahead by just a bit, lol. Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #7 on: May 07, 2005, 11:57:48 PM »

Where is all of the above?

Where is the long hive (trough hive, coffin hive etc.)?

Where is the eight frame and all mediums?

How about foundationless Langstroths?

I have:

One - two box long Dadant deep (22 11 1/4" deep frames)

Two - three box long medium depth hives with Langstroth frames.

Two - three box long medium depth hives of Langstroth dimentions with top bars instead of frames.

One KTBH (Kenya style Top Bar Hive with sloped sides).

Four DE hives.  (already mentioned above, but not in the list)

Twenty - eight frame Langstroth hives with all medium boxes.

Nineteen - ten frame Langstroth hives with all medium boxes.

Two - ten frame Langstroth hives with one deep and the rest mediums.

I have had log gums but don't have any right now.  

Never had a skep but I'd like to try one.

http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Michael Bush
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Horns Pure Honey
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« Reply #8 on: May 08, 2005, 02:11:40 AM »

For all of you in the USA that dont know we cant have skeps. I think Europe can and I dont know about other places.  Cheesy
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Ryan Horn
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« Reply #9 on: May 08, 2005, 07:26:35 AM »

Quote from: Horns Pure Honey
For all of you in the USA that dont know we cant have skeps. I think Europe can and I dont know about other places.  Cheesy


I've had log gums and box hives and you "can't" have those either.

Im almost every state, you "can't" have bees in a hive without movable combs, but I've had them in hives without movable combs just because the bees moved into them.  I've also had them in hives without movable combs so I can see what the spacing of natural comb is.

IF a bee inspector found a hive in a skep they would probably just destroy it because they can't inspect the combs.

And you "can't" drive 80 on the interstate.  But it doesn't seem to stop anyone.
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Michael Bush
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Jerrymac
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« Reply #10 on: May 08, 2005, 09:44:20 AM »

I can drive 80 on interstate, county roads,  back roads, etc. Done it many times. cheesy
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Miss Chick-a-BEE
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« Reply #11 on: May 08, 2005, 09:50:20 AM »

LOL So true Michael.

I have something like Rob's set-up.

One hive - homemade / basiclly used Langstroth dimensions / slightly bigger / holds 11 frames per box / turned 90 degrees like a DE hive / on a raised stand (18 inch legs) / with a screened bottom

One hive - homemade / basicly two Langstroth hives deep / front is only as wide as one langstroth turned 90 degrees / holds 24 frames (frames inside are like a very large filing cabinet - counting from entrance to back) / on a raised stand (18 inch legs) / with a screened bottom / has two seperate roof so I can put boxes on the front or back of the large brood area

Beth
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SherryL
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« Reply #12 on: May 08, 2005, 03:30:57 PM »

Well, I marked OTHER 'cause I have DE's too.   Cheesy
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Apis629
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« Reply #13 on: May 08, 2005, 04:29:30 PM »

Is a TBH considered a moveable frame hive or is it not comsidered a moveable frame hive becaise the comb is on bars, not in frames?
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beefree
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« Reply #14 on: May 12, 2005, 08:54:46 PM »

mine are all basically Langstroth, but Mr.Beefree is trying out a styrofoam version this year, and my favorite (because the bees are so laid back, so far) is all wood but has only mediums and shallows (lighter for me), in no  particular order, just what i had available as they built up.  I installed pkgs into two hives,  both wooden deeps, but with plastic frames and foundation that had been built out and at least half filled w/capped honey by a hive that froze to death this past winter.  We'll see what they are doing this weekend, since those two are 40 miles away.
beefree
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2005, 10:27:25 AM »

>Is a TBH considered a moveable frame hive or is it not comsidered a moveable frame hive becaise the comb is on bars, not in frames?

A TBH is a movable COMB hive.  I don't know of any state that would not allow one since you can examine every comb.  The laws against using hives without movable combs were so that inpsections for AFB could be done.  These are just as easy in a TBH (easier since you don't have to move six supers to get to the brood nest).
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Michael Bush
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Apis629
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« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2005, 09:33:10 PM »

Unfortunetly, I just checked the florida legeslature and they don't allow any non-langstroth hive.  I checked with the local extensions office and they can apperently destroy any hive that is considered a nusence and any hive not in a langstroth 10 frame hive.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2005, 09:22:58 AM »

>Unfortunetly, I just checked the florida legeslature and they don't allow any non-langstroth hive. I checked with the local extensions office and they can apperently destroy any hive that is considered a nusence and any hive not in a langstroth 10 frame hive.

I know several TBH beekeepers in Florida and they have had them inspected and had no problems.  It's true the law acutally uses the word "Langstroth" but the application of it is merely that you have to have movable combs that can be inspected.

Here's an email address for a Florida TBH keeper if you'd like to contact him:

scot@linuxfromscratch.org

Also, on this vote I didn't vote because it was multiple choice and I do have, in addition to all the others, several TBH's.  Three at last count.
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Michael Bush
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Apis629
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« Reply #18 on: May 18, 2005, 04:14:56 PM »

Thanks for the E-mail address.
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