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Author Topic: Swarms and pests,diseases  (Read 1118 times)

Offline VolunteerK9

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Swarms and pests,diseases
« on: April 08, 2010, 03:28:25 PM »
I'll have to admit I am way jealous of all the swarms that people on here have been posting about, but Jahjude brought up something I havent even thought about.  Wouldnt the risk of bringing in someone elses problems to your apiary through swarms be potentially catastrophic?  How do you prevent or minimize the risks of spreading disease through your home colonies?

Offline Jahjude

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Re: Swarms and pests,diseases
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 04:14:22 PM »
Only thing i can thk of right now is having a separate location for keeping hives taken from cut-outs or foreign swarms until they've been confirmed as being ok/clean,then they may be transferred to official apiary...Otherwise it'd be real risky.
Any other suggestions??
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Offline Finski

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Re: Swarms and pests,diseases
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2010, 01:02:52 AM »
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The basic system is that when you have bees, you should learn to identifye diseases when they appear.

Swarms are normally rid off diseases. They carry of course mites (tracheal + varroa) but you can clean them with thymol and formic acid.

If the sick hive is in the corner of the yeard, it does not protect other hives in the yard.


But this is the first time when I see an advice that "dont take swarms because they have diseases".

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Online kathyp

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Re: Swarms and pests,diseases
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2010, 01:13:52 AM »
i always figured that if the hive was strong enough to swarm, it probably was minimal risk.
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Offline VolunteerK9

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Re: Swarms and pests,diseases
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2010, 01:03:32 PM »
i always figured that if the hive was strong enough to swarm, it probably was minimal risk.

makes sense to me. a strong healthy hive will swarm. a weakend one from disease translates in to low population numbers, etc. so less likely to swarm

Offline Jahjude

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Re: Swarms and pests,diseases
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2010, 01:23:22 PM »
Totally agree,minimum risk maybe right but isn't there still a risks involved??Remember SHB may fly with a colony not to mention mites which attach themselves to bees....My point is if the option is there to keep new cut-outs at a separate location(not in same beeyard),that'd be best until they've strengthened and confirmed to be "pest-free''
I've chosen understanding over knowledge-since knowledge is all about knowing where to find facts and understanding is knowing how to manipulate knowledge...I've also chosen knowledge over beliefs!! We all need to..

 

anything