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Author Topic: 2 eggs in one cell  (Read 2324 times)
ivashka
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« on: April 04, 2010, 01:27:33 AM »

What does it mean when queen is laying two eggs in a cell (every other cell)?  huh huh
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Jahjude
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« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2010, 01:42:17 AM »

Can you confirm that it's actually a Queen doing this damage and not the act of a laying worker bee??
Worker bees may lay in cells if the hive remain queenless for too long and when a worker begins to lay it's usually in the pattern u described here
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JP
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2010, 03:23:50 AM »

This is quite common. New queens typically will lay multiples. Laying workers lay many, many multiples, but can't get the eggs quite to the bottom of the cells as their abdomens are not long as a queens.

Look to see if they are at the bottom or multiples not all the way on the bottom of the cells.

You are most likely just fine.


...JP
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Jahjude
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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2010, 03:28:43 AM »

Aaah There you go,check it out and let us know the situation.
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I've chosen understanding over knowledge-since knowledge is all about knowing where to find facts and understanding is knowing how to manipulate knowledge...I've also chosen knowledge over beliefs!! We all need to..
ivashka
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2010, 12:45:40 PM »

The Queen is there and I checked and eggs are all the way on the bottom sad Undecided  huh
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kathyp
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« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2010, 12:50:55 PM »

not to worry.  new hive?  new queen?  as JP said, they do that sometimes.  she'll figure it out. 

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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
OzBuzz
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« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2010, 09:10:30 PM »

Do you know how old the queen is? if she's on in years it might be time to re-queen
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ivashka
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« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2010, 01:08:39 AM »

I don't know how old queen is since I removed it from a tree branch in February. 
Thank you for replies.
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OzBuzz
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« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2010, 06:26:35 PM »

If you took the queen from a swarm it's likely that she's an old queen anyway! i would suggest getting another queen and re-queening your hive. Get whatever queen you would prefer to have based on their characteristics because whatever characteristics the queen has will eventually flow through the whole hive...
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kathyp
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« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2010, 06:43:42 PM »

i'd wait on replacing that queen.  give her a couple of weeks and see what happens.  it would be a shame to waste a good queen needlessly.
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
JP
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« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2010, 09:21:08 PM »

i'd wait on replacing that queen.  give her a couple of weeks and see what happens.  it would be a shame to waste a good queen needlessly.

Amen!


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
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riverrat
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« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2010, 10:07:23 PM »

i agree with waiting on axing the queen. Laying 2 eggs in a cell is a far better problem to have then lets say a shotgun brood patterns. IMHO i think there are a lot of queens that go to the gallows every year for a crime they didnt commit. Very seldom will i requeen usually the bees know best and if shes failing they will take care of the problem just my 2 cents
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OzBuzz
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« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2010, 01:14:11 AM »

Only reason i was suggesting to re-queen is because she would likely be old anyway... i guess if you're happy with her then keep her. My local beek suggested automatically re-queen any swarm you get and that's a practice that i will implement in my yard simply because i can control what i am working with and maintain the incredibly docile strain that i'm working.

If the hive has all of the traits you're looking for in terms of production, docility, workability etc then see what happens... she might come out of it ok.

When you said you removed it from a tree branch did you mean it was a swarm or just a hive that had built inside a branch?
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beee farmer
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« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2010, 01:35:12 AM »

Its a very common thing to observe.  I was not aware of how often it occurs until I started grafting.  I have had queens that laid nearly perfect patterns, prolifically, but still had a bad habit of plopping 2 eggs every 20 or 30 cells.   She had great traits other than that and raised boomer hives that really produced. Unless a queen laying 2 eggs per cell occasionally is in combination of other more serious problems I would not hold it against her. Undecided
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JP
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« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2010, 08:33:43 AM »

Only reason i was suggesting to re-queen is because she would likely be old anyway... i guess if you're happy with her then keep her. My local beek suggested automatically re-queen any swarm you get and that's a practice that i will implement in my yard simply because i can control what i am working with and maintain the incredibly docile strain that i'm working.

If the hive has all of the traits you're looking for in terms of production, docility, workability etc then see what happens... she might come out of it ok.

When you said you removed it from a tree branch did you mean it was a swarm or just a hive that had built inside a branch?

No, she is not LIKELY TO BE OLD ANYWAY. You don't know her age. If once set up and she goes to laying the proof will be in the pudding. If the bees decide she is inferior for whatever the reason they may supercede her.

As a beekeeper if we see a problem with her pattern, we requeen her.

If you want to requeen every swarm or cut out queen you ever run across that is certainly your decision.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
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kathyp
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« Reply #15 on: April 06, 2010, 09:23:45 AM »

Quote
and that's a practice that i will implement in my yard simply because i can control what i am working with and maintain the incredibly docile strain that i'm working

i collect swarms and do cutouts not only to expand, but to preserve genetics of any survivor hive i might be lucky enough to come across.  by automatically requeening, those genetics would be lost without ever knowing what kind of hive i was going to have.

we all have our own methods of beekeeping and reasons for why we do things.   

the trick is to think about why you are doing a thing, and not just to do it becuase............
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.....The greatest changes occur in their country without their cooperation. They are not even aware of precisely what has taken place. They suspect it; they have heard of the event by chance. More than that, they are unconcerned with the fortunes of their village, the safety of their streets, the fate of their church and its vestry. They think that such things have nothing to do with them, that they belong to a powerful stranger called “the government.” They enjoy these goods as tenants, without a sense of ownership, and never give a thought to how they might be improved.....

 Alexis de Tocqueville
ivashka
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Hi from Colorado


« Reply #16 on: April 06, 2010, 12:57:29 PM »

Thank you ALL for replying.  I will wait a few weeks to see how she is and make a decision as to whether I should replace her or keep her.
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OzBuzz
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« Reply #17 on: April 06, 2010, 05:47:56 PM »

Let us know how you go  Smiley

Definitely a lot of valid points to weigh up - thanks kathyp for your thoughts to - something i hadn't considered in regard the possibility you might get some good genetics.

I spoke to the beek i was talking about last night and he said his reasoning for doing it is, traditionally, the swarms he gets from his area are quite feral... doesn't mean they're all like that
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JP
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I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #18 on: April 07, 2010, 12:35:27 AM »

Let us know how you go  Smiley

Definitely a lot of valid points to weigh up - thanks kathyp for your thoughts to - something i hadn't considered in regard the possibility you might get some good genetics.

I spoke to the beek i was talking about last night and he said his reasoning for doing it is, traditionally, the swarms he gets from his area are quite feral... doesn't mean they're all like that

Feral bees are what most of us on here aim to get, myself included. Go back and read Kathy's post about survivor stock.

Survivor stock, true feral bees, same thing, a good thing, in most all cases. They are adapted to your area and have been dealing with mites and shb all on their own.


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
ivandespotov
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« Reply #19 on: April 07, 2010, 07:17:05 AM »

Mother Is marked?Is it certain that is the same.
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JP
The Swarm King
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I like doing cut-outs, but I love catching swarms!


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« Reply #20 on: April 07, 2010, 08:25:14 AM »

Mother Is marked?Is it certain that is the same.



International Queen Marking Color Code  Color:  For Year
Ending In: 
White (or gray)  1 or 6 
Yellow  2 or 7 
Red  3 or 8 
Green  4 or 9 
Blue  5 or 0 

Does this answer your question?


...JP
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"Good friends are as sweet as honey" Winne the Pooh

My pictures can be viewed at http://picasaweb.google.com/pyxicephalus
and
http://picasaweb.google.com/112138792165178452970

My Youtube videos can be viewed here: http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=JPthebeeman&aq=f

My website JPthebeeman.com http://www.jpthebeeman.com/jpthebeeman/
riverrat
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« Reply #21 on: April 07, 2010, 09:14:27 PM »

Mother Is marked?Is it certain that is the same.



International Queen Marking Color Code  Color:  For Year
Ending In:  
White (or gray)  1 or 6  
Yellow  2 or 7  
Red  3 or 8  





Green  4 or 9  
Blue  5 or 0  

Does this answer your question?


...JP

thanks for posting this jp. It good information. There is a lot of newbees (and oldbees) out there that would not know how the queen marking system works. although i must say that a lot of times the color marking in a good hygenic colony the color dot is groomed off the queen bee
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