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Author Topic: "Biscuit"' joined Hive Bodies  (Read 1582 times)
JWChesnut
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« on: March 26, 2010, 03:56:02 PM »

I am now in my third year of making hive bodies and supers using "biscuit"  joiners in lieu of Box joint laps.  Experience so far has been perfect.  I am wondering if others are using biscuits to reinforce butt joints on hive bodies? 

The main advantage is time savings and simplicity.  The full depth boxes are made with 3 biscuits at 2.5, 5 and 7.5 inch centers.  The long side is cut to full length -- 19" 7/8, and the short sides are the interior dimension.  I use large size biscuits and gorilla glue.  I add three deck screws to tighten at each corner.  There is a massive time savings in not having to cut finger joint patterns on 8 (!) ends for every box. 

I don't price out the cost of the biscuits which is moderate.

One *massive* advantage is the short sides are smaller (14 3/4), and it is possible to cut a full hive from each 6 linear feet of board.

  I am sure many others have had the problem of the 72 1/2 inch runnning requirement for hives which does not cut into "modern" exact-length pine boards without waste.  Buying 8 feet to get that last half inch + kerfs is really, really, really frustrating over time.  I know you can buy 8' and 12's and make up multiple boxes in an elaborate cut list to minimize waste.  However, I only build and store a few boxes at a time.

If anyone else has long-term experience with biscuit-joined hive bodies, I would be interested in hearing about it.  Are there "exterior" grade biscuits for instance?

  I haven't had weather damage or opening cracks, but I don't expect the hive bodies will be quite as sturdy as fingerjoint models. I don't transport my hives, so I suspect there is less impact as hives that are moved regularly.
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hardwood
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« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2010, 04:21:29 PM »

They should work ok IF moisture can't reach the biscuits....as soon as it does you'll have problems. Lamello makes a plastic biscuit that's meant for joining solid surface materials (i.e. Corian) that would work well but needs epoxy as an adhesive.

It wouldn't be my preferred method of joining boxes, but if you're careful you should get a lot of use out of them.

Scott
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lakeman
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« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2010, 09:28:36 PM »

Using gorilla glue, ie is very expansive, waterproof, and the best gap filler, so if you get a good glue job, there is no way water can get into the joint, and the biscuit joint will be as strom\ng as any other joint.
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doak
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2010, 01:06:08 PM »

On home made boxes I use plain old butt joints with glue and so far have not had a problems.
I consider any extra time or $'s spent is a waste unless it takes care of a foreseen problem.
Nutten Fancy. :)doak
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Scadsobees
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2010, 10:05:35 PM »

On home made boxes I use plain old butt joints with glue and so far have not had a problems.
I consider any extra time or $'s spent is a waste unless it takes care of a foreseen problem.
Nutten Fancy. :)doak

How do you make old butt joints?
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Rick
doak
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« Reply #5 on: April 01, 2010, 11:35:46 PM »

Simply have the end of the board squared off. place the end against the side of the other board at a 90 degree angle. side flush with the end of the other board. Corner with out dove tail/rabbit,etc.
Just like this reply box. rolleyes :)doak
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lakeman
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2010, 07:18:17 AM »

I use a rabbit joint, as the wood usually is cupped, and rhe rabbit makes for a flat straight joint, and is very easy to do.  If building deeps, I use 1x8 stock, and use biscuits to add 1 & 3/8ths inch  strip to the width, to make it 9 & 5/8ths.
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