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Author Topic: Top bars  (Read 1176 times)
doak
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Location: Central Ga. 35 miles north of Macon


« on: March 13, 2010, 08:26:02 PM »

I came across some Composite Molding strips. Can I trim these for top bars?
What is this stuff made of and will it hurt the bees? :)doak
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Yappy
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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2010, 09:19:02 PM »

I wouldn't, most composite stuff is pressed paper.
May just fall apart when wet. Cry
The tiny amount of material required, go for the best real wood.
Or just use Free paint stir sticks from H.D. cut in half length way.
Tip: go full across less 1/2" at ends.
... Rob evil
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doak
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« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2010, 11:31:36 PM »

This I have isn't paper. It looks like some fiber glass and a mix of plastic. :)doak
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Yappy
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« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2010, 03:58:41 AM »

Better than the paper stuff around here.
Just a thought, maybe test to see if wax will stick well to it.
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Jack
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« Reply #4 on: March 15, 2010, 10:55:36 AM »

I think the fiberboard is MDF a product made from tree bark. Real nice stuff for painting and non structural applications but very little strength, especially when made into small thin stock. Best to use real wood IMHO.

Jack
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slaphead
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« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2010, 11:17:31 PM »

Very few wood composites use glue that will withstand the humidity in a hive.  1 by 2 pine works just fine and is dirt cheap.  You can cut a groove along its length on your table saw and glue in a thin wooden guide or fill the groove with beeswax to get them building down the middle in the right direction  Wink

I  wouldn't risk the composite.

SH
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Buzzen
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« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2010, 07:31:15 PM »

Sounds like you might have some trex scraps.  It is molded plastic type material they use for decks and such.
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