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Author Topic: Varroa strategy in Denmark , Questionnaire 2005  (Read 1896 times)
Finski
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« on: January 02, 2010, 02:11:07 AM »

Formic acid and oxalic acid

http://www.biavl.dk/index.php?Itemid=50&id=114&option=com_content&task=view
What is Denmark: http://www.beekeeping.com/countries/denmark.htm

The questionnaires points out that beekeepers on larger scale are going for methods that are rapid in use. None of these beekeepers are using the time-consuming methods such as lactic acid spraying, queen exclusion or heat treatment. Also drone brood removal is very restricted in use (25%). Some of the beekeepers answers that drone brood removal is used under certain conditions, such as single colonies with high number of mites within the season. The beekeepers were also asked about the use of volatile oils. Presumably none are using this method since this kind of product is not well known in Denmark. The main varroa treatment is the use of evaporation of formic acid right after the honey harvest in August – September and then a late treatment in October with oxalic acid trickling, combined with a spring treatment.

Formic acid is used by all beekeepers, but in different ways. The use of the krämer board is the most predominant method. Used by 60,0% of the beekeepers. The use of free formic acid is also common used. Several beekeepers remarks that the free formic acid is used only in nearby apiaries. The nassenheider evaporator is used by 15,0%.

Oxalic acid is used by all beekeepers except 2. Spraying of oxalic acid was used some years ago, but is not used anymore. Trickling is the dominant method. Evaporation of oxalic acid was only used by one beekeeper. This beekeeper used this method as the only treatment.

70,0% were producing nucs, to secure the number of colonies wintering out in the springtime. Several of the beekeepers pointed out that the production of nucs not are because of varroa, but solely to have a surplus of colonies in the springtime, in years with heavy winter losses.

Counting the mite downfall is not a big issue for the large scale beekeepers. 20,7% does never look for natural mite downfall. They can’t see the necessity. Their methods and strategy is satisfying. 60% are looking for mite downfall when it is necessary. But they never count mites. They look at the debris and make a very fast monitoring calculation „situation under control" or „situation might get out of control". Spot test are used. Several are only looking on sealed drone brood, opening a few cells.

60,0% claims that they have never seen damaged colonies or bees. 25,0% claims that they do have single colonies now and then, that have damages due to varroa.

65,0% do realise that the organic varroa treatment is more time consuming than the use of drugs. Several of the beekeepers haven’t answered the question, since they never have used drugs, and therefore can’t compare. Some of the beekeepers even claim that there is no extra time consumption.

The reason for using the organic methods is very clear. All (100%) are doing this to ensure honey as a clean natural product without any kind of residues. 50% are doing this due to a long-term strategy and 45% are doing it because concerns regarding resistance to drugs.

75% of the asked beekeepers have never considered the use of any kind of drug as a possibility, not now or in the future. This was underlined very clearly by the beekeepers in the questionnaire. 10,0 % didn’t know if they might change strategy.


  

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Finski
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« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2010, 02:16:00 AM »

.
Denmark is very advanced beekeeping country and it has shown  example in many cases to whole Europe. .
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kathyp
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« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2010, 10:23:18 AM »

finski, do you think that the complete brood break in winter makes a difference in hive survival?  i know i have no brood for part of my winter. probably a couple of months.

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Finski
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« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2010, 11:14:40 AM »

finski, do you think that the complete brood break in winter makes a difference in hive survival?  i know i have no brood for part of my winter. probably a couple of months.



I do not think. It has been researched. OA trickling affects only on mites on bees and OA tricklin is one method which can be done in the middle of winter.

It is same with swarm,. You may clean the swarm from mites away by oxalic acid.
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2010, 08:51:26 PM »

Finski

I caught a video of OA dribble a few days back.  I think it may have been from a Denmark beekeeper on you tube.  I was amazed to see him apply the OA syrup with a syringe to the cluster in the winter when snow was all around the hive. 

Is this normal practice there and does not harm the bees to put wet syrup on them?

It seems easy and fast to do and not as risky as vapor.

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« Reply #5 on: February 13, 2010, 02:51:02 PM »

 

Is this normal practice there and does not harm the bees to put wet syrup on them?

It seems easy and fast to do and not as risky as vapor.



It has been   some l years normal system to kill varroa. It is very quick and easy and the best temperature is about 0- +5C.  It takes 30 seconds to open the hive and give the cure.
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« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2010, 12:39:35 AM »

 

Is this normal practice there and does not harm the bees to put wet syrup on them?

It seems easy and fast to do and not as risky as vapor.



It has been   some l years normal system to kill varroa. It is very quick and easy and the best temperature is about 0- +5C.  It takes 30 seconds to open the hive and give the cure.

Somehow I missed your reply.  I just asked this question in another post but here it is again. 

Can you treat in fall and spring or is it to hard on the colony?  You should have mostly new bees come spring with the exception of the queen. 
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Finski
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« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2010, 08:23:02 AM »


Can you treat in fall and spring or is it to hard on the colony?  You should have mostly new bees come spring with the exception of the queen. 


Fall treatment should be done when yield is taken away. Its duty is to protect winterbees which are just under rearing.
Formic acid and thymol are best stuffs. Those need 15C day temperature to be effective and it takes 2-3 weeks time to handle.

Spring treatment is used when autumn and winter treatment have not succeeded.

Basicly in the countries where is a long brood period, they should use 2 treatments: after yield and winter during brood break.

If hives have not brood break, mite control is painfull.

In my climate most beekeepers treat only once in winter or after yield.
Sometimes, -  like just now,  I must make a spring treatment, because I tricled hives too early and they had some brood.

I trickle hives with oxalic acid again very soon after cleansing flight.

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« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2010, 09:01:52 AM »

Thank You Finski. 

I think I will try oxalic come September or November when they should have no brood.  If the mites get out of control this summer, maybe I will try formic acid.
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Finski
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« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2010, 02:25:17 PM »

Thank You Finski. 

I think I will try oxalic come September or November

Oxalic acid is used in Finland in November -december. When temp is zero that is good.
In September hives have brood.

If you get a swarm, you may handle it with trickling.
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