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Author Topic: Looks like paste ??  (Read 2945 times)
Rich V
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« on: April 27, 2005, 01:53:20 PM »

Checked my hives for the first time Monday. It has been one week since I put the packages in. Saw what I think are eggs, but no larva. Lots of differant colored pollen, and honey. In the very bottom of some cells there is what looks like a pale paste. Is that the begining of a larva? Where can I find instructions on how to post a picture?

Rich V.
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Finsky
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« Reply #1 on: April 27, 2005, 02:57:10 PM »

When larva is very little, it is easier to see feeding juice on the bottom of cells.




Here you see some diffrent age larvas, varroa mites too.

Some larvas are dead.


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Michael Bush
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« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2005, 03:01:19 PM »

Is that chilled larvae or EFB?  A lot of dead larvae there.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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Rich V
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« Reply #3 on: April 27, 2005, 07:16:19 PM »

Finsky
What does feeding juice look like?
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Jay
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2005, 10:36:16 PM »

It looks like pale paste! What you are probablly seeing is royal jelly. All brood are fed royal jelly for the first three days of their life. After this, if it is to be a normal worker bee, she is fed pollen and bee bread ( a mixture of pollen and honey ).If it is a queen she will be fed royal jelly her whole life. Royal jelly is secreted by the hypopharyngeal gland of nurse bees. Bees 5-15 days old produce the most. It is whitish opaque in the bottom of the cell and is quite normal. Cheesy
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Bruce Hanson
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« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2005, 08:45:29 AM »

Finally we have someone who acually sounds like he knows what he is talking about
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Finsky
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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2005, 09:38:23 AM »

Quote from: Bruce Hanson
Finally we have someone who acually sounds like he knows what he is talking about


Heh heh! Just look into the brood cells Cheesy
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Rich V
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« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2005, 01:48:48 PM »

Would it be safe to say then,if they are feeding royal jelly to the larva that the queen is alive and well. Or it possiable they could be making a new queen.
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Finsky
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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2005, 02:16:58 PM »

Quote from: Rich V
Would it be safe to say then,if they are feeding royal jelly to the larva that the queen is alive and well. Or it possiable they could be making a new queen.


Don't hesitate. Bees feed 3 days young larvas with royal jelly. It is like milky liquid at bottom of cells. It is not importat you to know. Bees do it without your help.

You just care, that queen is laying eggs. Eggs turn normal larvas and pupas and NOT drone pupas. Then all is right! You will learn everything sooner or later.

Next thing is, that capped pupa area is even and not full of holes like after gun shot. If there are plenty of holes inside brood, you should se carefully, are there collapsing or dead larvas.

Do not hesitate. Beekeeper check these things with routine.

Holes inside brood may also exist when at spring they feed some larvas and others not. When larvas is moist and are glimmering in the light, it is good.  Like here


If some of larvas are dry (no food in the cell), and not glimmering, deasease may be developing in the colony.
.
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Rich V
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« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2005, 02:25:26 PM »

Finsky
Thanks for your help. Where can I see a picture of capped honey,and capped brood. I don't know how to tell the differance.
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Michael Bush
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« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2005, 02:53:54 PM »

>Would it be safe to say then,if they are feeding royal jelly to the larva that the queen is alive and well.

If you kill a queen, four days later there will still be four day old worker larvae being fed Royal jelly.  You only know what you know and that is that there was a queen there four days ago.  That may mean that it's PROBABLE that there is still a queen, but it doesn't prove it.

>Or it possiable they could be making a new queen.

They would have to have lost the queen in the last few days, unless you have laying workers who are laying drones.

I'm not sure what you mean by this, but finding young larvae being fed royal jelly would not be evidence that you lost a queen or not.  It only means you had one four days ago.
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Michael Bush
My website:  bushfarms.com/bees.htm
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SherryL
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« Reply #11 on: April 30, 2005, 10:20:33 PM »

Rich, the cappings of honey are very white, and usually near the top of the frame.  The cappings for brood are in a cirular shape in the center of the frame and are more 'golden' color, or tannish (if that's a color).  They brood caps are slightly rounded too, the honey caps lie pretty flat.  Sorry I don't have a pic off hand. The pic in this thread is brood, if you've ever seen a picture of comb honey, that is very smooth surface, very white, that's capped honey.  Hope that helps.

sherry
btw, where in N. Il are you?  I'm in Gurnee, although my bees are in N. Wis.
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SherryL
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« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2005, 12:54:32 PM »

Rich, I just noticed, under the "photo gallery" board there's a subject. "After 21 days", just posted today I think, anyway he's got great pics of a frame with brood capped on the bottom half and honey at the top - take a look, you'll see the color difference very easily...

sherry
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Rich V
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« Reply #13 on: May 01, 2005, 06:14:39 PM »

Sherryl

Thanks for the reply. After reading your discription,and looking at some pictures I found in a book I believe I can tell the dif, now.

I live Rural Rockton. About 15 miles North of Rockford,and just a mile or two South of Beloit Wis. Gurney is about an 1 1/2 drive from me.

To bad you couldn't get your bees closer. Would you be interested in a location closer?
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SherryL
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« Reply #14 on: May 01, 2005, 07:01:44 PM »

I knew a girl many years ago from Rockton, she was a Mary Kay consultant.  My middle son and husband were out in Beloit a few weeks ago, my son is looking at Beloit College as a possibility.

I'd love to have my bees closer, but I really can't as I spend my summer months in N. Wis.  I'm there from about the first week of June thru Aug. full time.  In the spring and fall I just drive alot!  Smiley  Last fall I wrapped the hives about the 3rd week of Oct.  I was up there again at Thanksgiving and Christmas and heard humming in all three hives so I was hopeful they'd make it through the winter, but as it turns out only 1 hive did - the other two ran out of stores.  

The surviving hive is quite large now.  I added a 3rd hive body to the top 2 1/2 weeks ago just to give them some room until I could be up there to do a split.  I went back this past week but it was too cold to even so much as open the hive.  I switched out the feeder bucket on top of the inner cover and left it at that.  I'll be back in about 10 days, hopefully at that time the temps will be up in the 60's and I can make the split.
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Rich V
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« Reply #15 on: May 01, 2005, 10:19:41 PM »

I looked at my hives Friday. One hive is doing very well. Bees are busy,and there is eggs ,and larva. The second hive the bees are bringing in pollen but there are no eggs or larva. I picked up a frame of eggs and larva from another bee keeper,installed it so that they will make a new queen. When the weather gets a little better I'll check it's progress.
Farmers around here look for beekeeper to put their hives on their farms.
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