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Author Topic: MDA Splitter Technique  (Read 5046 times)
specialkayme
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« on: February 28, 2010, 09:29:22 PM »

 All information that I am referring to can be found here: http://www.mdasplitter.com/ (for those who haven't read it yet, like myself, until a few weeks ago).

So, I know this isn't a new topic, or a new technique. But the more I read about it, the more it seems like he shouldn't be able to provide such rapid growth. From one hive to sixteen in one summer. It appears that something isn't being accounted for, but I don't have any experience with it, so I don't know what's missing.

Does anyone have any experience with this technique?

My concern isn't so much with "outbreeding mites," I'm fortunate enough that I don't really need to worry too much about mites (through genetic selection, of which this author discards as impossible). My concern is more with growth. I have never been able to produce nucs this fast. It would be a good year for me to split a hive three ways and have all three hives make it through the winter. But then again I'm not very good at swarm management, so the problem is likely with me.

If anyone has experience with this, I am also interested in the potential it has for the south and warmer climates. The author seems to revolve around colder temperatures (where he is located). I would imagine that changing it for the south would be easier, as you don't need as much stores, and you can split them earlier.

Ideas? Problems?

http://www.mdasplitter.com/docs/MelsCalendar.pdf

http://www.mdasplitter.com/docs/NucManagement.pdf

http://www.mdasplitter.com/docs/OTS.pdf
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2010, 08:17:57 AM »

The thing about any split where you let the queen cells just hatch into the hives is that you only end up with one virgin queen that may not safely return from mating.  And of course you lose several weeks of brood production. 

You could use the same queen production method, but cage the cells before they emerge, and improve your odds.  Of course that makes it a bit more complicated - but not much.

With the MDA system he is using those broodless periods to boost honey production and manage varroa.  But if you are only after expansion and aren't worried about varroa or honey then it seems like you would be better off rearing queens and having your splits immediately start producing brood.

You should try it though - or modify it a bit to suit what you want out of it.  Let us know How it works out.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

Putting the "ape" in apiary since 2009.
specialkayme
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« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2010, 08:39:18 AM »

You should try it though - or modify it a bit to suit what you want out of it.  Let us know How it works out.

I'm contemplating using one hive to try out this technique, just to see how it works. The problem is that I have to adapt the technique to the south. Less stable flows, of which end much faster down here. That and the whole time table moves ahead by about a month and a half, at least.

But I'm punching the numbers, seeing if it's possible.
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bee-nuts
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« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2010, 07:32:43 PM »

You should try it though - or modify it a bit to suit what you want out of it.  Let us know How it works out.

I'm contemplating using one hive to try out this technique, just to see how it works. The problem is that I have to adapt the technique to the south. Less stable flows, of which end much faster down here. That and the whole time table moves ahead by about a month and a half, at least.

But I'm punching the numbers, seeing if it's possible.

Im glad you found this as interesting as I have.  If you have another yard near by that you can use, why not try feeding them.  If your away from your strong colonies, robbing should not be to much of an issue then. 

I am also interested in the way this guy makes queens.  Do you know anything about queen banks.  I would like to try making one.  If you make a cell builder, you can transfer queen cells to small mating nucs, then transfer the mated queens to your queen bank.  That way you know you know you have viable mated queens ready when you make up nucs and can eliminate the lost queen factor.  Of course this is lots of work for a small operation like mine but sounds like enough fun to me to make it worth it.

Just some thoughts.  Hope it works for you.
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David LaFerney
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2010, 08:49:59 PM »

If you are going to keep them for an indefinite time (for emergencies) it would probably be easier for the beek and better for the queens to just keep them in nucs or queen castles.  I don't know, but it seems like banking them would be a lot of trouble unless it was just for a few days.  Maybe not.  If I have enough resources I'm going to try it and find out.
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"It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." Samuel Clemens

Putting the "ape" in apiary since 2009.
bee-nuts
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2010, 10:20:14 PM »

If you are going to keep them for an indefinite time (for emergencies) it would probably be easier for the beek and better for the queens to just keep them in nucs or queen castles.  I don't know, but it seems like banking them would be a lot of trouble unless it was just for a few days.  Maybe not.  If I have enough resources I'm going to try it and find out.

Your absolutely right and I was thinking just that after I posted.  That just came to mind as I was given the idea for storing queens I may get in the first week of April, while I make make nucs or wait for favorable weather to pull brood.  But like you said, if you are making your own queens you might as well leave em where they are and putting them in a bank would be pointless.
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The moment a person forms a theory, his imagination sees in every object only the traits which favor that theory

Thomas Jefferson
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