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Author Topic: Brand new diabetic :-\  (Read 1883 times)
Sean Kelly
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« on: February 18, 2010, 02:15:51 AM »

Found out two days ago that I'm Type 2 diabetic.  Barely with a A1C of 6.3% but definately got it.  My doc doesn't have me on meds and wants to try and kick this with diet and exercise which I'm not good at either one.  But at 31 years old, I'd rather work out and eat better than worry about a heart attack or stroke.  I'm too young to worry about that sort of stuff.

Got a One Touch Ultra Mini meter which is pretty awesome.  The little test strips plug in and sucks up the blood drop, giving a instant reading.  Always kinda wondered how these things work after seeing the commercials on TV.  The finger poking sucks though.  It came with a thing called a "Lancer" that when you push a button it quickly pokes you.  Except I have calloused fingers from being a musician and a blue collar tanker trucker and couldn't get it to poke through.  There are depth settings from 1 to 9.  Started with 1 and worked my way up to 7.  By the way, I HATE NEEDLES!!!  Those first 6 were SCARY.  And the 7th finally actually bit me. 

Anyways, it sucks.  I have a VERY EXPENSIVE class that I have to take in a month.  Not sure why I have to take it or what they cover or why it freakin costs so much ($1600).

Sorta ironic though, a beekeeper who loves honey on everything becomes diabetic.  Any other diabetic beeks here?  Any diabetics in their 30's here?

Sean Kelly

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« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2010, 03:56:21 AM »

Found out two days ago that I'm Type 2 diabetic.  Barely with a A1C of 6.3% but definitely got it.  My doc doesn't have me on meds and wants to try and kick this with diet and exercise which I'm not good at either one.  But at 31 years old, I'd rather work out and eat better than worry about a heart attack or stroke.  I'm too young to worry about that sort of stuff.

Got a One Touch Ultra Mini meter which is pretty awesome.  The little test strips plug in and sucks up the blood drop, giving a instant reading.  Always kinda wondered how these things work after seeing the commercials on TV.  The finger poking sucks though.  It came with a thing called a "Lancer" that when you push a button it quickly pokes you.  Except I have calloused fingers from being a musician and a blue collar tanker trucker and couldn't get it to poke through.  There are depth settings from 1 to 9.  Started with 1 and worked my way up to 7.  By the way, I HATE NEEDLES!!!  Those first 6 were SCARY.  And the 7th finally actually bit me. 

Anyways, it sucks.  I have a VERY EXPENSIVE class that I have to take in a month.  Not sure why I have to take it or what they cover or why it freakin costs so much ($1600).

Sorta ironic though, a beekeeper who loves honey on everything becomes diabetic.  Any other diabetic beeks here?  Any diabetics in their 30's here?

Sean Kelly



Sean,

I am Sorry to hear of your new condition, most of us pretty much know someone close to our hearts that are type 1 or 2, but do not despair. I have 2 Friends that have Type 2, they say they are " Lucky " to have that instead of type 1.  You are just a Kid at 31, Diet and exercise will do wonders for you, but it will not be easy ( Life should not be easy, otherwise we become weak and complacent ). As far as the honey, I have read articles about Tupelo Honey from Florida, it has a different sugar structure than the others, you ( may ) be able to consume it, but the Doc has to approve of it, do the research.

Godspeed  Smiley
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« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2010, 09:50:46 AM »

Sean,   Better to be able to take care of your diabeties with diet and exercise than to have to inject insulin in your bellie all the time.  (My father) and he could have if he would have started eating right and exercising.  He has been dealing with his now for twenty years.  I took him on a trip last year.  Just me and him for two weeks.   Yup watched him eat chocolate cake,  no bake cookies, and toast with honey.  I yelled at him and he just laughed.  It is serious to keep an eye one but he cheats his diet all the time.  Just not in huge quanities.  He says he actually enjoys stuff more now as it is a REAL treat.   Instead of poking the tip of your fingers were they are all calloused move back a little more and use the side of your finger.  Takes a lot less to draw from there.
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JP
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« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2010, 10:29:28 AM »

Sean, my wife became diabetic about five years ago. She has always had a sweet toothe. I always went for protein & preferred fatty meats, now I have to watch how much fats I consume or the doctor says I could wind up with Cirrhosis of the Liver. I had to give up quite a lot, including fried foods! And I live right outside of New Orleans.

Sean, I have a good friend who found out he had type 2 in his late 30's. He is now in his late 50's. The guy is very disclipined in his diet and has basically cured himself of the symptoms of diabetes. He takes no pills.

You can do it too, but you will have to change some things in your diet. First thing, give up all soft drinks, just drink water and lemon, ain't anything better really. Watch those carbs and eat real food, meat, fish and fruits and vegetables. Lay off any packaged stuff. Eat a traditional diet like your great great grandparents ate and you'll be fine.

A little honey now and again is fine, just don't overdo it. My wife keeps hers in check with a pill a day btw, albeit she could do a lot better, her doc says she's doing alright except for her weight. And she goes to those high dollar classes too!

Best of luck man! With a little discipline you can kick this thing!


...JP

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« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2010, 10:53:54 AM »

my father kept his in check for 30 years by changing his diet, exercising, and losing weight.  my brother is borderline and has been able to beat it so far by doing the same.  

i have a meter also as i was having problems with my blood sugar dropping to low.  smiley  if you have a meter that will allow you to test somewhere other than your fingers, experiment a bit and see if you can find a spot that doesn't hurt as much.  honestly, i think for most people it's the idea, not the pain.  i used to have patients pass out when i pull out a needle.  i hadn't even stuck them yet!

good luck.  the diet changes are not so bad for most (except JP smiley  
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« Reply #5 on: February 18, 2010, 02:33:20 PM »

Sharing a few thoughts from what I have dealt with having had a mother with type 1 for nearly 30 years.

Having type 2 is not the end of the world, as your doctor said, weight control, exercise and diet are your best friends, but keeping stress under control too is important - it is amazing how your body can cause itself to change, almost like a mood ring.

Having a working pancreas (albeit in manual compared to auto - forgive the laymen term, but it does apply well) require more attention than you are obviously use to having to do. The trick is reading the feedback of that your body tells you, from Anxiety to tiredness, you can feel a range of physical and emotional roller-coaster stuff.

Metering is something that many doctors will torture you with if you are borderline type 1, I think the case is find a routine that works for you and (minus daily activity changes) you can zone in something close to meeting your needs without over-testing. Of course, like anything it requires YOU to understand how it all works, or doesn't in diabetes and make subtle changes that make the right differences.

The most important thing is far swings from low to high, each having obvious consequences. Low, you often need others to tell you that you are not focused, sweaty, uncoordinated and other telltale signs that family should be made aware of. When you crash low (if you crash low) is something the diabetic needs a support group (or person for) it is a simple fix, but it also is like experiencing a drug effects that don't come at you like a lion, but like a lamb.

The high end of your blood sugar level has consequences, the first at a high (but not deadly level) around 225 where your body quits healing, literally. So keeping below 225, beside allowing healing of cuts, bruises, post surgery, infections and more is critical to good health. Again with type 2, if you measure in those ranges you surely need meds to replace your bodies natural regulator - and is every bit as important as keeping a watch on the low numbers.

Anything I have ever read states that outside of a proper diet that exercise (not so much as weight control) but keeping a good heart rate and stamina is soooo very important.

Keeping a list of your test numbers vs. meal intake will paint you a picture that you can retweak your meals and exercise until you are happier with the test numbers. It can be an amazing experience that tunes you into your body's functionality unlike ever before, it isn't something anyone would want to have to deal with, but since you have no choice, you need to be the master, not the slave.

You can look back and say you took situation in your own hands and win on a day by day basis, with the biggest lesson being that you are a machine, which is how a doctor has to look at you as, and keeping the parts working well pays off with a long life and a healthier you. Best of luck and pay attention to how you feel when your numbers are all over the place, as time goes on with type 2, you may totally keep yourself into the zone and be the healthiest as you have ever been.
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« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2010, 12:08:32 PM »

Sean my grandmother had type 1.  I still remember her having to boil her reused needle every morning.  She was so excited when they invented disposable!  Dad had type 2, had to change his diet, but was not overweight. His was controlled with pills.  I am a prime candidate genetically so have had to make a preemptive strike!  That's why I work @ the farm, great exercise and wholesome veggies. As you know, I love CAKE but if I have cake at the meetings, I don't have anything the next few days.  I have a book if you want it that deals with diet changes.  Eat as much whole unprocessed foods as you can.  Whole foods work much differently in the body than processed. Shop on the outer isles, make your garden this summer, the work will be good for you or join TRF! Whole foods are actually easier, how hard is is to grab a handful of nuts, an apple, orange or banana? Limit anything that has hydrogenated or high fructose, enriched breads, look for whole grains.  You just have to read the labels.  You would be surprised how much hidden sugar, salt and bad fats are in what is sold.  Your girls will keep you in line also! evil  They would probably like to go for walks around the neighborhood and the hill will give you a great workout!  It's much easier to incorporate exercise into your daily routine than to have to make time, with kids, something always comes up!  You will be in my prayers let me know if you want the book!

Jody
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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2010, 10:50:38 PM »

I am intimately involved in diabetes.  My parents (both bakers) are type two, and my 13 year old son is type one.  Your pancreas works, but not as well as one who does not have the condition.  What is more, however, is that the other cells in your body are not as sensitive to insulin as are those in a non-diabtetic.  This is a one-two punch to your body.  Your cells do not react to insulin as they should (and thus do not efficiently move sugar from the blood into the cells for use as fuel).  This requires the islet cells on your pancreas to work harder to make more insulin.  This, in turn, wears out your pancreas.  The solution?  Decrease insulin requirements and thus demands on pancreas.  To do this, you must alter your diet to decrease the body's needs for quick releases of insulin.  This means eat carbohydrate from sources that require longer (for lack of a better term) digestive periods.  Bread is the worst;  in fact anyting with large amounts of white flour falls into this category too.  This is because it has glucose which is the simplest sugar and is immediately available to your bloodsteam.  IF your sugars are more complex (and in limited quantities) it takes time for the liver to convert them to glucose which is the sugar that triggers insulin release. Exercise works by using the sugar that is in the blood and using up sugar stores (glycogen) which are stored in the liver and to a lesser extent muscle tissues.  Weight lifting is great to burn the sugar up as is anything that requires anaerobic exertion.  Aerobic exercise will also burn sugar and decrease fat tissue which also helps to increase insulin sensitivity (and thus the demands on your pancreas.

Take the class.  It is worth the money and will help you understand the chemistry of what is going on.  Food is the most powerful drug you put in your body and you do it multiple times a day.  You will learn how these food affect you, and this will help you make good choices.  Type II diabetes is no fun, but it is controllable at your age and stage, and you will do fine with effort and thought.  IT will be hard at first, but the results are worth it.

My son eats honey all the time.  Six carbs per serving.  Do not kid yourself on types of honey being better for diabetics.  All have the same sugar content and must be treated as such.  IF you eat honey, eat a little at a time, be sure you have exercised and remember to eat less sugar later in the day as a result.
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« Reply #8 on: February 23, 2010, 10:11:27 PM »

I too, suffer from type 2 Diabites. and I'm currently keeping it in check with 2 Metformin tablets twice a say, which puts me on the llucky side.  Both my parents, as well as numerous relatives on both sides of the family have had either type 1 or type 2 diabetis for severl generations, so my getting it at some point in my life was a foregone conclusion.  I'm lucky it waited until I was in my mid 50's and can control it so easy.

I have one habit that is both bad for my diabetis and drives my wife crazy, when I get busy working around the place I forget to stop and take lunch or snack breaks, which causes my sugar level to drop below 80, and then I get dizzy, nauseated, and weak at the knees.  Then I know it's time to quit, at lealst  long enough to recharge the body.  A glass of orange juice and a sub sandwich with lots of veggies works well for that.  But of course the best thing is not to get into the position of having your sugar drop dangerously low or go too high.  One problem you'll need to watch out for, you'll probably learn this in your class, is that dining out can be a challenge as it is much to easy to eat something at a restuarant and suddenly find you sugar level in the 400s. 

Canned and processed foods are high in everything a Diabetic doesn't need so read the lables closely.  Eating a diet of home cooked meals with fresh foods is best because you can control what you eat so much better, but if that's not possible ask your waitress lots of questions about the menu.

I'm also lactose intolerant so between that and being diabetic I have to grill the water/witress like it was the Spanish Inquisition.
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Sean Kelly
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« Reply #9 on: March 09, 2010, 11:01:18 AM »

That's for the support and advice everyone!
Well it's been three weeks now and I'm doing great!  I feel so much better already.  My wife has really been getting into this healthy cooking and bought several diabetic cookbooks.  We also joined the local gym and I've been going for at least 1 hour a day, every day, doing pretty intense cardio.  Incredibly, I've lost 14lbs already just from diet and exercise since I was diagnosed a diabetic.
I do miss Coke and Pepsi (not diet) and candy and other junk, but I feel soooooo good now that I could care less about missing that stuff.  My blood sugar levels have not spiked above 140 in the last couple weeks and I've been able to keep it down below 110 when I first wake up in the morning.  I only have 4 lbs more to go before I reach my short term goal of being under 300 lbs.  Then only 100 lbs to go till I reach my long term.  Thank goodness for personal trainers and dietitians.

Sean Kelly
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« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2010, 07:01:51 PM »

Congratulations on your efforts.  It sounds as if you are off to a great start.  Be sure to work some weight lifting into your routine when appropriate.  The weight lifting is anaerobic and will require your body to burn up its sugar stores.  This will further decrease blood glucose.
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