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Author Topic: Glues  (Read 3321 times)
Two Bees
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« on: February 09, 2010, 07:56:02 AM »

I use Titebond III to assemble all of my outer woodenware.   I am considering buying a gallon instead of the smaller bottles that I have been purchasing.

Does glue have a shelf life?
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bassman1977
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« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 08:12:09 AM »

I use Gorilla glue.  I get the smaller bottles.  After about a year of not using it, it's dried up.  I've assembled over 100 boxes and countless frames and have only gone through about 2 bottles of the stuff...and the first bottle was 1/2 full when it dried up.
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BeeHopper
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« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 08:19:20 AM »

I use Titebond III to assemble all of my outer woodenware.   I am considering buying a gallon instead of the smaller bottles that I have been purchasing.

Does glue have a shelf life?

There's an 800 Number on the glue bottles for customer service, they will answer any question you have. I called the Gorilla Glue folks once with concerns of the toxic components of the glue after it dries, they explained to me that when it cures, the bees will not be subject to any toxins of the glue, I suppose they were already asked about it Smiley
« Last Edit: February 09, 2010, 09:03:43 AM by BeeHopper » Logged
wfuavenger
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« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2010, 08:32:23 AM »

With Gorilla, you have to push out any remaining air it will cause the glue to harden if there is half the container full of air.
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Hemlock
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« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2010, 09:11:06 AM »

I use tight bond III and have noticed that after a year and a half it can have minor granulation.  I think it's due to the air sitting in the bottle after it's half empty.  to much air for the glue not to dry out.  A gallon jug might have the same issue.
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nella
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« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2010, 09:44:56 AM »

I buy tight bond water proof a gallon at a time because it is cheaper. I noticed that it would get e little thicker with age and I just add a little water to thin it out. It works just as good as it did before I added the water to thin it out.
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kathyp
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« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2010, 09:54:43 AM »

i love gorilla glue for almost everything.  do start with a small bottle as you don't need much and it does dry out.  pay attention to the "you don't need much" part.   grin
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« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2010, 11:23:57 AM »

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Gorilla is polyurethane glue and it hardens with water moisture.

When you have half a bottle, the air part breathes with air pressure and it get moisture.

I have problem that my bottles freeze in autumn when I forget them in my cottage.
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Burl
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« Reply #8 on: February 09, 2010, 11:31:22 AM »

  Hi ,  Gorilla Glue and Elmer's Ultimate Glue are in my experience , equivalants .  The Elmer's brand is less expensive .  They are a water activated polyurethane , and are marine quality , suitable for boat-building .  Some additional properties are that the "squeeze-out" or excess can be easily carved off with a Knife after it has set .  And if a glued portion needs to be machined , this polyurethane glue is far less damaging to cutting edges like sawblades or planer knives than yellow glue ( carpenters glue ).  If I get some on my hands , it's hard not to , I rub my hands thoroughly with butter , wipe off with paper towel , then wash with dish soap , before it sets .
  When I thin either yellow or white glue with water I have learned to use water that has been sterilized .  I have had some go moldy when I didn't use sterilized water .
  Hope this is useful to some .
  ---Burl--- from one sticky situation to another .
 
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danno
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« Reply #9 on: February 09, 2010, 12:25:36 PM »

I used Titebond III until last year.   On this site someone responded to a  glue thread and stated about a study done by one of the national wood mags.   They found that Titebond II held up to wet locations better than III.   I switched and have had great results with II.   A gallon last me 6-8 months as long as I keep it warm. 
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HAB
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« Reply #10 on: February 09, 2010, 01:09:00 PM »

Wow! Talk about timing.  Just put togather some inner covers and had used my left over Titebond III from last year.  Boy was it in bad shape.  Had lots of simi dried globs that just made a mess.  So I'm off to Ace to get some Titebond II.
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Eshu
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« Reply #11 on: February 09, 2010, 03:02:04 PM »

Storing the polyurethane glue (Gorilla, Titebond III, etc.) bottles upsidedown can give you a little more shelf life.  Just be certain the caps are on tight.  I put them in yogurt containers just in case. 
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Mason
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« Reply #12 on: February 09, 2010, 04:27:33 PM »

Gorilla glue is pretty good stuff but can be hard to manage.  A little too much and it looks like a mess.  Without clamps it can push your parts apart and really leave you in a bind.  FYI: Gorilla Duct tape is really something special too.

For hive parts I have stuck with basic wood workers glue.  If you smear glue on the joints and let it soak in and dry, then glue the parts together there is a much stronger bond.  The stuff is cheap and last forever.  It's likely not AS good as Gorilla Glue or some of the new fancy adhesives but seems to do a good job especially for the cost if you take the time to pre-glue.
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fish_stix
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« Reply #13 on: February 09, 2010, 05:23:23 PM »

I use Titebond II and Titebond III interchangably. If you have more than 50 hives I'll just about guarantee you'll never have to worry about a gallon jug going bad. I wish I could buy 5 gal buckets.  grin
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Two Bees
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« Reply #14 on: February 09, 2010, 05:38:33 PM »

I use Titebond II on the frames since they are out of the weather.  I haven't read that article about II being better than III when it gets wet. 
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wd
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« Reply #15 on: February 09, 2010, 05:53:19 PM »

When placing my first woodenware order, I asked those in the store what glue is recommended? I'll never forget those words, "you're using glue?" with the laughter and silent chuckles until I loaded up left. Never did get answer.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #16 on: February 09, 2010, 07:39:38 PM »

Quote
When placing my first woodenware order, I asked those in the store what glue is recommended? I'll never forget those words, "you're using glue?" with the laughter and silent chuckles until I loaded up left. Never did get answer.

Interesting.  I wonder...does that place deal mainly with commercial beeks?  I would assume that it would be a too slow of a process for most commercial beeks to glue their equipment.  I could be wrong though.  But even still, they should realize that hobbyists and side-liners may be more willing to do glue the woodenware.
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wd
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« Reply #17 on: February 09, 2010, 08:23:04 PM »

Quote
When placing my first woodenware order, I asked those in the store what glue is recommended? I'll never forget those words, "you're using glue?" with the laughter and silent chuckles until I loaded up left. Never did get answer.

Interesting.  I wonder...does that place deal mainly with commercial beeks?  I would assume that it would be a too slow of a process for most commercial beeks to glue their equipment.  I could be wrong though.  But even still, they should realize that hobbyists and side-liners may be more willing to do glue the woodenware.

Yes they do deal with commercial outfits. They also have hobbyist items on display in their store. I  did fail to mention previously that while I didn't get an answer on a brand name for glue it was pointed out in a nice way that I'm not giving the bees and propolis enough credit and I didn't push it any further.

Regardless, I used an all purpose wood glue. I had a few boards warp on hive body's after painting that gave me second thoughts about using glue.
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bassman1977
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« Reply #18 on: February 09, 2010, 08:49:35 PM »

Quote
I did fail to mention previously that while I didn't get an answer on a brand name for glue it was pointed out in a nice way that I'm not giving the bees and propolis enough credit and I didn't push it any further.

It is a good point.  Sometimes when frames do break apart and I am able to get them back together in the hive, I know the propolis will do the trick to fix it up, at least temporarily.  I still like the glue though.  The propolis is just an extra weld to make the equipment stronger.  smiley
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Sparky
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« Reply #19 on: February 09, 2010, 09:14:40 PM »

FYI:  If you smear glue on the joints and let it soak in and dry, then glue the parts together there is a much stronger bond.  The stuff is cheap and last forever.  It's likely not AS good as Gorilla Glue or some of the new fancy adhesives but seems to do a good job especially for the cost if you take the time to pre-glue.

Now that is a good thought, Mason.  The glue on all of the end grains would seal the lumber of the joints that take most of the weather. I like the Titebond II for the frames but lean towards the polyurethane glue for boxes just because it is thicker and stays put without dripping as easily and it expands a bit as it solidifies and fills any imperfections in the joints like caulk.
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