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Author Topic: Colorado native plants  (Read 1797 times)
Shawn
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« on: February 09, 2010, 12:12:29 PM »

I was talking with another member about planting native plants. I found a list of Colorado Native plants and Invasive plants. I posted the link just in case someone in the Colorado area is interested. I printed the list and will take it with me when I do my flower shopping this year. Its funny, I wanted to plant clover but the clover is on the invasive list  Sad. The link to the list is at the bottom of the link I posted.

http://www.denverplants.com/perennials/html/native_invasive.htm
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MrILoveTheAnts
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« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2010, 05:01:51 PM »

For those of you having trouble finding these plants in stores (as often happens) I'd like to recommend Prairie Moon Nursery which sells almost 100% native plants.
http://www.prairiemoon.com/

Their use of the word Savana instead of partial sun is a little confusing though. They're a great source of plants for where ever you are in the country I think.

Clovers are considered invasive and nonnative to the US. Most clovers anyhow, I'm not sure of any natives off hand. That White Dutch Clover bees like are imported BUT as far as invasive plants go, you could certainly do worse. Go ahead and plant clover. It's a 4 inch tall plant, that is easily shaded out by just about anything else you plant. The issue is when you have huge patches of clover everywhere. They can actually put to much nitrogen into the soil and that effects all your fruit trees, and can limit the plants that grow around there. A lot of native plants absolutely hate fertilizer.

It's hard to recommend a native alternative that is the right size. One plant I'm trying out this year though is Lead Plant, Amorpha canescens. It's native to the central US though. (I'm in from New Jersey but I really wanted to try this one out.)
http://www.prairiemoon.com/seeds/trees-shrubs-vines/amorpha-canescens-lead-plant/?cat=0&from_search=Y
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=AMCA6&mapType=nativity&photoID=amca6_002_avp.tif
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Shawn
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« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2010, 05:40:14 PM »

Thanks for the links. I was looking at some local, Colorado, vendors but thought $60.00 + is a lot for a lbs. of "native seed." I like the looks of Prarie clover and its on the native list for Colorado so Im going to go ahead and try it out. I know the white dutch clover is listed as invasive however I think Ill sow some in the yard because it can be taken out easy by spraying it. I also still want to plant from Sea Holly, gay feathers, and blazing stars into a flower bed I have nothing in. I have been having great difficulty finding the plants in plant form. I have another area where I have to take out a tree stup that is full sun and I want to plant some cactus that will put off a bloom for the bees also. My neighbors house is now for sale and Im trying to buy it so I can get rid of the house and have another lot to plant stuff in. I dont think the bank will let me borrow 30,000 to have an empty lot though.
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